Impact of Dietary Patterns, Nutrition, and Lifestyle on Aging and Elderly Health

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Geriatric Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2024 | Viewed by 2372

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
Interests: vitamins; sports nutrition; nutritional requirements in the older adult and aging process; liver disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The World Health Organization’s data indicate that by 2050 nearly 25% of the global population will be 60 or older. This increasingly aged global population, or ‘gray tsunami’, will have a ubiquitous societal impact and change the individual’s functional capacity secondary to the biological changes of aging. This individual, societal and health system impact of this gray tsunami is so profound that the UN created a collaborative between academia, governments, the private sector and communities to catalyze actions fostering healthy aging. This collaborative, called the Decade of Healthy Aging (2021-2030), highlights the importance of research and critical reviews on the role of dietary patterns and lifestyle on aging and health of the older adult.

We are pleased to invite you to submit research articles or reviews related to the impact of dietary patterns and lifestyle on the aging and health of older adults. Globally, life expectancy has increased but the amount of time without disability or illness has not significantly increased. Stated differently,  identifying dietary and lifestyle factors that may impact aging and the health of older adults, particularly healthy life expectancy, is critical.

This Special Issue aims to investigate the role of dietary patterns, nutrition, and lifestyle behaviors during this important life cycle stage with a particular focus on the following areas: regulation and dysregulation of metabolic health, including inflammation and cell senescence, risk of chronic disease, cognitive function and impairment, telomere stability, nutrient sensing, mitochondria functioning, maintenance of skeletal muscle mass and functional independence. The ultimate question is whether specific dietary patterns, including but not limited to daily meal composition and timing, as well as physical activity choices and other lifestyle behaviors including participation in stress reduction techniques, can positively impact the aging and health of the older adult. 

Dr. Hope Barkoukis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • healthy aging
  • dietary patterns
  • nutrition
  • lifestyle behaviors
  • physical activity
  • metabolic health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 269 KiB  
Article
Association between Dietary Patterns and All-Cause Mortality in the Chinese Old: Analysis of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey Cohort
by Yufei Chen, Ying Gao, Yexin Chen, Zuxin Wang, Huifang Xu, Fan Hu and Yong Cai
Nutrients 2024, 16(11), 1605; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16111605 - 24 May 2024
Viewed by 383
Abstract
Diet is one of the most important ways to intervene and promote the health of older adults and reduce all-cause mortality. This study aimed to investigate the association between dietary patterns and all-cause mortality in the Chinese old. This study involved 11,958 subjects [...] Read more.
Diet is one of the most important ways to intervene and promote the health of older adults and reduce all-cause mortality. This study aimed to investigate the association between dietary patterns and all-cause mortality in the Chinese old. This study involved 11,958 subjects aged 65–116 years in the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) from 2008 to 2018. Dietary patterns were derived from principal component analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation. Four dietary patterns were derived: the ‘milk–egg–sugar pattern’, ‘carnivorous pattern’, ‘healthy pattern’, and ‘northeastern pattern’. Cox proportional hazard models were built for males and females separately to estimate the relationship between different dietary patterns and all-cause mortality. After adjusting for all covariates, the milk–egg–sugar pattern played a reverse role in mortality risk in males and females in different quartiles. In the carnivorous pattern, only males in the fourth quartile were observed to have a significantly reduced mortality risk (HR = 0.84 (95% CI: 0.77–0.93)). Both genders benefited from the healthy pattern, which consistently lowered mortality risk across all quartiles (males: HR = 0.87 (95% CI: 0.84–0.89); females: HR = 0.95 (95% CI: 0.92–0.97)). The northeastern pattern also showed an inverse association with all-cause mortality in males (HR = 0.94 (95% CI: 0.92–0.97)) and females (HR = 0.96 (95% CI: 0.93–0.98)). This study showed the association between dietary patterns and all-cause mortality in the Chinese old, which is significant for further quantitative studies. Full article
14 pages, 1446 KiB  
Article
Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Protein-Enriched Diet Can Reduce the Risk of Cognitive Impairment among Older Adults: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Research
by Liang Wang, Xiaobing Xian, Mengting Zhou, Ke Xu, Shiwei Cao, Jingyu Cheng, Weizhi Dai, Wenjia Zhang and Mengliang Ye
Nutrients 2024, 16(9), 1333; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16091333 - 28 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Background: Cognitive impairment (CI) is a common mental health disorder among older adults, and dietary patterns have an impact on cognitive function. However, no systematic researches have constructed anti-inflammatory diet (AID) and protein-enriched diet (PED) to explore their association with CI among older [...] Read more.
Background: Cognitive impairment (CI) is a common mental health disorder among older adults, and dietary patterns have an impact on cognitive function. However, no systematic researches have constructed anti-inflammatory diet (AID) and protein-enriched diet (PED) to explore their association with CI among older adults in China. Methods: The data used in this study were obtained from the 2018 waves of the China Longitudinal Health and Longevity Survey (CLHLS). We construct AID, PED, and calculate scores for CI. We use binary logistic regression to explore the relationship between them, and use restrictive cubic splines to determine whether the relationships are non-linear. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were used to demonstrate the robustness of the results. Results: A total of 8692 participants (mean age is 83.53 years) were included in the analysis. We found that participants with a higher AID (OR = 0.789, 95% confidence interval: 0.740–0.842, p < 0.001) and PED (OR = 0.910, 95% confidence interval: 0.866–0.956, p < 0.001) score showed lower odds of suffering from CI. Besides, the relationship between the two dietary patterns and CI is linear, and the results of subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis are also significant. Conclusion: Higher intakes of AID and PED are associated with a lower risk of CI among older adults, which has important implications for future prevention and control of CI from a dietary and nutritional perspective. Full article
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