Special Issue "Nutrients 2009–2019: The Present and the Future of Nutrition"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Maria Luz Fernandez Website E-Mail
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
Phone: 860-486-5547
Interests: lipoprotein metabolism, functional foods, eggs, metabolic syndrome, diabetes
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Lluis Serra-Majem Website E-Mail
Professor of Preventive Medicine & Public Health, Director of the Research Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
Interests: Mediterranean diet, public health, nutrition, obesity, epidemiology, diet, macro and micronutrients, hydration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As we move forward and continue to publish the most recent and prominent scientific findings in Nutritional Sciences for the next 10 years, the current Editors in-Chief would like to take a look at the history of Nutrients. During its first decade, Nutrients very promptly became a well-known, heavily cited journal. These accomplishments were possible due to the vision of the Founding Editors as well as the commitment of the Associate Editors, Editorial Board Members, and the Managing Editors of the journal.

Currently, Nutrients exclusively publishes in Open Access and follows strict processing procedures that ensure the quality of published papers, with an extremely short average processing time of 35 days. Nutrients’ excellent reputation is based on a solid editorial team with an editorial board of devoted and expert Associate Editors, Editorial Board members, and reviewers who guarantee the outstanding level of all accepted papers and very efficient Managing Editors. Our most sincere thanks to all of them.

To celebrate its 10th Anniversary, Nutrients is sponsoring a Conference in Barcelona 27–29 September 2019 where we will have the possibility to exchange the latest news in the nutrition arena. We will also have time to acknowledge the work done in this first decade and to envision the next 10 years with new targets and missions. Thanks to all of you for having chosen Nutrients to help us write the present and the future of nutrition expeditiously, transparently, and rigorously.


Prof. Dr. Maria Luz Fernandez
Prof. Dr. Lluis Serra-Majem
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutrients
  • 10th Anniversary

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Probiotic Supplementation is Associated with Increased Antioxidant Capacity and Copper Chelation in C. difficile-Infected Fecal Water
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2007; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092007 - 26 Aug 2019
Abstract
Probiotic supplementation plays a key role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis due to its ability to modulate gut microbiota. Although their potential as potent antioxidants have previously been explored, their ability to affect the redox status in the gut lumen of healthy subjects or [...] Read more.
Probiotic supplementation plays a key role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis due to its ability to modulate gut microbiota. Although their potential as potent antioxidants have previously been explored, their ability to affect the redox status in the gut lumen of healthy subjects or those with gastrointestinal (GI) disorders remains unclear. In our study, we assessed the ability of single strain and multispecies probiotic supplementation to cause a change in the redox status of normal fecal water and in Clostridium (C.) difficile-infected fecal water using a simulated gastrointestinal model. Changes in redox status were assessed by ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), 2’,2’-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and iron and copper chelation assays. The findings from our study showed that in normal fecal water, probiotic supplements, apart from Lactobacillus (L.) rhamnosus R0011, showed a significant increase in iron chelation (p < 0.05), which was associated with lower FRAP and copper chelation. In C. difficile-infected fecal water, all probiotic supplements showed a significant increase in FRAP (p < 0.05) and were associated with increased copper chelation. The DPPH assay showed no treatment effect in either fecal water. These findings suggest that C. difficile mediates dysregulation of redox status, which is counteracted by probiotics through ferric-reducing ability and copper chelation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients 2009–2019: The Present and the Future of Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Sugar-Containing Beverages Consumption and Obesity in Children Aged 4–5 Years in Spain: the INMA Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1772; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081772 - 01 Aug 2019
Abstract
The consumption of sugar-containing beverages (SCB) has been associated with obesity although the evidence in preschool children is scarce. Cross-sectional analyses were performed to assess the association between obesity and SCB consumption (packaged juices and sugar-sweetened soft drinks) in 1823 children at the [...] Read more.
The consumption of sugar-containing beverages (SCB) has been associated with obesity although the evidence in preschool children is scarce. Cross-sectional analyses were performed to assess the association between obesity and SCB consumption (packaged juices and sugar-sweetened soft drinks) in 1823 children at the age of 4–5 years from the INfancia y Medio Ambiente (INMA) Project. One drink was defined as a glass of 175 mL, and the consumption of SCB was categorized in <1, 1–7 drinks/week and > 1 drink/day. We used multiple logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR). The average SCB consumption was 79.1 mL/day, mainly from packaged juices (80.9%). The SCB consumption was lower in non-obese children than in children with obesity, 76.6 vs 118.4 mL/day (p = 0.02). After adjusting for covariates, children who consumed >1 drink/day showed elevated odds of obesity, OR = 3.23 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.48–6.98) compared to children who consumed <1 SCB drink a week. Each additional SCB drink per day was associated with higher odds of obesity, OR = 1.55 (1.14–2.09). Higher consumption of packaged juices, but not sugar-sweetened soft drinks, was significantly associated with higher odds of obesity, OR = 1.55 (1.09–2.15) and OR = 1.59 (0.76–3.39), respectively. A higher SCB consumption is associated with obesity in preschool children, mainly due to the consumption of packaged juices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients 2009–2019: The Present and the Future of Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparisons of Visceral Adiposity Index, Body Shape Index, Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference and Their Associations with Diabetes Mellitus in Adults
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1580; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071580 - 12 Jul 2019
Abstract
The associations between visceral adiposity index (VAI), body shape index and diabetes in adults were inconsistent. We assessed the predictive capacity of VAI and body shape index for diabetes by comparing them with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). We used [...] Read more.
The associations between visceral adiposity index (VAI), body shape index and diabetes in adults were inconsistent. We assessed the predictive capacity of VAI and body shape index for diabetes by comparing them with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). We used the data of 5838 Chinese men and women aged ≥18 years from the 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the independent associations between Chinese VAI (CVAI) or body shape index and diabetes. The predictive power of the two indices was assessed using the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and compared with those of BMI and WC. Both CVAI and body shape index were positively associated with diabetes. The odds ratios for diabetes were 4.9 (2.9–8.1) and 1.8 (1.2–2.8) in men, and 14.2 (5.3–38.2) and 2.0 (1.3–3.1) in women for the highest quartile of CVAI and body shape index, respectively. The area under the ROC (AUC) and Youden index for CVAI was the highest among all four obesity indicators, whereas BMI and WC are better indicators for diabetes screening. Higher CVAI and body shape index scores are independently associated with diabetes risk. CVAI has a higher overall diabetes diagnostic ability than BMI, WC and body shape index in Chinese adults. BMI and WC, however, are more appealing as screening indicators considering their easy use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients 2009–2019: The Present and the Future of Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
25-Hydroxyvitamin D Measurement in Human Hair: Results from a Proof-of-Concept study
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 423; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020423 - 18 Feb 2019
Abstract
Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in numerous human diseases leading to an increased interest in assessing vitamin D status. Consequentially, the number of requests for vitamin D measurement keeps dramatically increasing year-on-year. Currently, the recognised best marker of vitamin D status is [...] Read more.
Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in numerous human diseases leading to an increased interest in assessing vitamin D status. Consequentially, the number of requests for vitamin D measurement keeps dramatically increasing year-on-year. Currently, the recognised best marker of vitamin D status is the concentration of the 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D3) in the blood circulation. While providing an accurate estimate of vitamin D status at the point in time of sampling, it cannot account for the high variability of 25(OH)D3 concentration. In this proof of concept study we set out to provide evidence that 25(OH)D3 can be extracted from hair samples in a similar fashion to steroid hormones. Two of the authors (L.Z. and M.H.) provided hair samples harvested from the crown area of the scalp and the third author (E.L.) provided beard samples. These samples, cut into 1 cm lengths, were weighed, washed and dried. 25(OH)D was extracted using a previously published steroid hormones extraction procedure. Blood samples were taken from the subjects at the same time all tissue samples were analysed using liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry. Hair samples showed presence of quantifiable 25(OH)D3 with concentrations ranging from 11.9–911 pg/mg. The beard sample had a concentration of 231 pg/mg. Serum levels of 25(OH)D3 ranged from 72–78 nmol/L. The results presented here confirm the feasibility of measuring 25(OH)D3 in hair samples. The findings warrant further validation and development and have the potential to yield valuable information relating to temporal trends in vitamin D physiology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients 2009–2019: The Present and the Future of Nutrition)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Dietary Strategies for Weight Loss Maintenance
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1916; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081916 - 15 Aug 2019
Abstract
Weight regain after a successful weight loss intervention is very common. Most studies show that, on average, the weight loss attained during a weight loss intervention period is not or is not fully maintained during follow-up. We review what is currently known about [...] Read more.
Weight regain after a successful weight loss intervention is very common. Most studies show that, on average, the weight loss attained during a weight loss intervention period is not or is not fully maintained during follow-up. We review what is currently known about dietary strategies for weight loss maintenance, focusing on nutrient composition by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies and discuss other potential strategies that have not been studied so far. Twenty-one studies with 2875 participants who were overweight or obese are included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Studies investigate increased protein intake (12 studies), lower dietary glycemic index (four studies), green tea (three studies), conjugated linoleic acid (three studies), higher fibre intake (three studies), and other miscellaneous interventions (six studies). The meta-analysis shows a significant beneficial effect of higher protein intake on the prevention of weight regain (SMD (standardized mean difference) −0.17 (95% CI −0.29, −0.05), z = 2.80, p = 0.005), without evidence for heterogeneity among the included studies. No significant effect of the other strategies is detected. Diets that combine higher protein intake with different other potentially beneficial strategies, such as anti-inflammatory or anti-insulinemic diets, may have more robust effects, but these have not been tested in randomized clinical trials yet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients 2009–2019: The Present and the Future of Nutrition)
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Open AccessReview
Are Fruit Juices Healthier Than Sugar-Sweetened Beverages? A Review
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1006; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051006 - 02 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Free sugars overconsumption is associated with an increased prevalence of risk factors for metabolic diseases such as the alteration of the blood lipid levels. Natural fruit juices have a free sugar composition quite similar to that of sugar-sweetened beverages. Thus, could fruit juice [...] Read more.
Free sugars overconsumption is associated with an increased prevalence of risk factors for metabolic diseases such as the alteration of the blood lipid levels. Natural fruit juices have a free sugar composition quite similar to that of sugar-sweetened beverages. Thus, could fruit juice consumption lead to the same adverse effects on health as sweetened beverages? We attempted to answer this question by reviewing the available evidence on the health effects of both sugar-sweetened beverages and natural fruit juices. We determined that, despite the similarity of fruits juices to sugar-sweetened beverages in terms of free sugars content, it remains unclear whether they lead to the same metabolic consequences if consumed in equal dose. Important discrepancies between studies, such as type of fruit juice, dose, duration, study design, and measured outcomes, make it impossible to provide evidence-based public recommendations as to whether the consumption of fruit juices alters the blood lipid profile. More randomized controlled trials comparing the metabolic effects of fruit juice and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption are needed to shape accurate public health guidelines on the variety and quantity of free sugars in our diet that would help to prevent the development of obesity and related health problems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients 2009–2019: The Present and the Future of Nutrition)
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Other

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Open AccessDiscussion
Comprehensive Approaches to Improving Nutrition: Future Prospects
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1760; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081760 - 31 Jul 2019
Abstract
When it comes to nutrition, nearly everyone has an opinion. In the past, nutrition was considered to be an individual’s responsibility, however, more recently governments have been expected (by some) to share that responsibility by helping to ensure that marketing is responsible, and [...] Read more.
When it comes to nutrition, nearly everyone has an opinion. In the past, nutrition was considered to be an individual’s responsibility, however, more recently governments have been expected (by some) to share that responsibility by helping to ensure that marketing is responsible, and that food chains offer healthy meal choices in addition to their standard fare, for example. In some countries, governments have gone as far as to remove tax from unprocessed foods or to introduce taxes, such as that imposed on sugary soft drinks in the UK, Mexico, France and Norway. Following on from the sugar tax, chocolate might be next! Is this the answer to our burgeoning calorie intake and increasing poor nutritional status, or is there another approach? In this narrative we will focus on some of the approaches taken by communities and governments to address excess calorie intake and improve nutritional status, as well as some of the conflicts of interest and challenges faced with implementation. It is clear that in order to achieve meaningful change in the quality of nutritional intake and to reduce the long-term prevalence of obesity, a comprehensive approach is required wherein governments and communities work in genuine partnership. To take no or little action will doom much of today’s youth to a poor quality of life in later years, and a shorter life expectancy than their grandparents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients 2009–2019: The Present and the Future of Nutrition)
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