nutrients-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

The Effects of Nutrition and Physical Activity on the Health of Older Adults

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 October 2024 | Viewed by 3525

Special Issue Editor

Graduate Institute of Sports, Leisure and Hospitality Management, National Taiwan Normal University, 162, Heping East Road Section 1, Taipei 106, Taiwan
Interests: behavioral epidemiology; obesity prevention; environment and physical activity; sedentary behavior and health; health-related quality of life in the elderly; diet

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Evidence shows the importance of diet and physical activity for older adults. However, there are still many gaps in our knowledge regarding physical activity, sedentary behavior, and diet in improving the health-related quality of life among older adults, especially older adults with sarcopenia, frailty, and chronic diseases. Thus, the effects of the interaction between diet and physical activity on older adults need to be researched deeply.

Therefore, this Special Issue of Nutrients “The Effects of Nutrition and Physical Activity on the Health of Older Adults” welcomes submissions of original research and reviews focusing on nutrition and physical activity in older adults.

Dr. Yung Liao
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nutrition
  • dietary
  • physical activity
  • sedentary behavior
  • older adults
  • sarcopenia
  • frailty
  • muscle
  • chronic diseases

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

11 pages, 453 KiB  
Article
Sedentary Behavior and Phase Angle: An Objective Assessment in Physically Active and Inactive Older Adults
by Liu-Yin Lin, Jiaren Chen, Ting-Fu Lai, Yen-Yu Chung, Jong-Hwan Park, Yih-Jin Hu and Yung Liao
Nutrients 2024, 16(1), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16010101 - 27 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1125
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to investigate the associations of the objectively assessed total sedentary behavior (SB) amount and SB patterns with phase angle (PhA) in older populations and to conduct a comparison analysis for those who are physically active (meet [...] Read more.
The purpose of the present study was to investigate the associations of the objectively assessed total sedentary behavior (SB) amount and SB patterns with phase angle (PhA) in older populations and to conduct a comparison analysis for those who are physically active (meet 150 min/week) and inactive (less than 150 min/week). During May to August 2023, a convenience sampling was used to recruit older adults (aged ≥ 65 years) living in a community in Taiwan. The total SB amount (minutes/day), SB patterns (including SB bouts and breaks), and physical activity were assessed by a triaxial accelerometer. A multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analyzer (BIA) was used to measure PhA. Multiple linear regression analysis was employed to examine the associations between SB and PhA in the total number of participants and stratified in the physically active and inactive groups. For the whole sample (n = 166; mean age: 72.1 ± 5.5 years), the total SB amount and patterns of SB were not associated with PhA. For those physically active, the total SB amount and SB patterns were not associated with PhA. Among those physically inactive, the total SB amount was negatively related to PhA (B: −0.059, 95% CI: −0.118, 0.000). This study underscores the importance of minimizing the total SB amount in physically inactive older adults, providing evidence for future interventions targeting SB and PhA in this population. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 410 KiB  
Article
The Longitudinal Association of Egg Consumption with Cognitive Function in Older Men and Women: The Rancho Bernardo Study
by Donna Kritz-Silverstein and Ricki Bettencourt
Nutrients 2024, 16(1), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16010053 - 23 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1827
Abstract
This study examines the prospective association of egg consumption with multiple domains of cognitive function in older, community-dwelling men and women followed for 16.3 years. Participants were 617 men and 898 women from the Rancho Bernardo Cohort aged 60 and older, who were [...] Read more.
This study examines the prospective association of egg consumption with multiple domains of cognitive function in older, community-dwelling men and women followed for 16.3 years. Participants were 617 men and 898 women from the Rancho Bernardo Cohort aged 60 and older, who were surveyed about egg intake/week in 1972–1974, and attended a 1988–1991 research visit, where cognitive function was assessed with 12 tests. Analyses showed that egg intake ranged from 0–24/week (means: men = 4.2 ± 3.2; women = 3.5 ± 2.7; p < 0.0001). In men, covariate-adjusted regressions showed that egg intake was associated with better performance on Buschke total (p = 0.04), long-term (p = 0.02), and short-term (p = 0.05) recall. No significant associations were observed in women (p’s > 0.05). Analyses showed that in those aged <60y in 1972–1974, egg intake was positively associated with scores on Heaton copying (p < 0.04) and the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE; p < 0.02) in men and category fluency (p < 0.05) in women. Egg intake was not significantly associated with odds of poor performance on MMSE, Trails B, or category fluency in either sex. These reassuring findings suggest that there are no long-term detrimental effects of egg consumption on multiple cognitive function domains, and for men, there may be beneficial effects for verbal episodic memory. Egg consumption in middle age may also be related to better cognitive performance later in life. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop