E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Natural Additives in Food"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Lillian Barros

Centro de Investigação de Montanha (CIMO), Instituto Politécnico de Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: natural products; food chemistry; analytical chemistry; natural food ingredients; bioactive compounds
Guest Editor
Dr. Isabel C.F.R. Ferreira

Centro de Investigação de Montanha (CIMO), Polytechnic Institute of Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia, 5300-253, Bragança, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: food chemistry, natural ingredients and additives, nutraceuticals and functional foods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The controversy and ambiguity related with chemical additives, allied to sporadic scares, have paved the way for natural additives to gain interest and funding. Today, most consumers prefer foods added with natural additives, rather than artificial ones, which is seen by the food industry as an opportunity to find new and more efficient natural-based solutions, while fighting to reduce the overall use of additives, producing minimally processed goods. The benefits of natural additives are endless, their synergy and effectiveness are a great leap over artificial additives that carry out, in most cases, only one effect over the food.

The plant and fungi kingdoms are great sources of bioactive compounds, that can be used to develop natural food ingredients. These natural compounds can be added as extracts, taking advantage of the synergistic effects between compounds, or as individual molecules, after purification, thus adding the most bioactive ones to the foodstuff. Although quite promising, natural additives still face some drawbacks and limitations. Therefore, an important research topic is the discovery of new alternative sources of natural additives fulfilling the different classes: preservatives (antimicrobials, antioxidants and anti-brownings), nutritional additives, coloring agents, flavoring agents, texturizing agents and miscellaneous agents.

This Special Issue “Natural Additives in Food” invites researchers to contribute with original research or review articles related to natural ingredients for food applications, including natural compounds obtained from plants, mushrooms, marine and bee products, extraction procedures, chemical identification, stabilization techniques, and food incorporation.

Dr. Lillian Barros
Prof. Dr. Isabel C.F.R. Ferreira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bio-based compounds
  • Extraction procedures
  • Chemical characterization
  • Food incorporation
  • Stabilization techniques
  • Functional foods

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Stability Analysis of Anthocyanins Using Alcoholic Extracts from Black Carrot (Daucus Carota ssp. Sativus Var. Atrorubens Alef.)
Molecules 2018, 23(11), 2744; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23112744
Received: 29 August 2018 / Revised: 22 October 2018 / Accepted: 22 October 2018 / Published: 24 October 2018
PDF Full-text (3113 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Anthocyanins are used for food coloring due their low toxicity and health benefits. They are extracted from different sources, but black carrot has higher anthocyanin content compared with common fruits and vegetables. Here, we study alcoholic anthocyanin extracts from black carrot to enhance
[...] Read more.
Anthocyanins are used for food coloring due their low toxicity and health benefits. They are extracted from different sources, but black carrot has higher anthocyanin content compared with common fruits and vegetables. Here, we study alcoholic anthocyanin extracts from black carrot to enhance their stability. The objective of our research is to determine if microencapsulation with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) is a feasible option for preventing black carrot anthocyanin degradation. Extraction solvents were solutions of (1) ethanol/acetic acid and (2) ethanol/citric acid. Samples were purified through a resin column and microencapsulated using TEOS. Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra of samples were obtained, and degradation studies were performed under different conditions of UV radiation, pH and temperature. Antioxidant activity was evaluated with radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging and electrochemical cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC). Color evaluation on food models were performed with CIE Lab at the beginning of experiments and after 25 days of storage. Results indicate that the more stable extracts against pH media changes are samples obtained with ethanol/acetic acid solution as extraction solvent. Extract purification through resin and TEOS microencapsulation had no significant effect on extract stability. In conclusion, although TEOS microencapsulation has proven to be effective for some dried materials from natural extracts in our previous research, we do not recommend its use for black carrot extracts considering our results in this particular case. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Additives in Food)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Effect of Beta Cyclodextrin on the Reduction of Cholesterol in Ewe’s Milk Manchego Cheese
Molecules 2018, 23(7), 1789; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23071789
Received: 21 June 2018 / Revised: 18 July 2018 / Accepted: 18 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
PDF Full-text (595 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD) is a cyclic oligosaccharide consisting of seven glucose units and is produced from starch using cyclodextrin glycotransferase enzymes to break the polysaccharide chain and forming a cyclic polysaccharide molecule. The use of β-CD in food research for reduction of cholesterol is
[...] Read more.
Beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD) is a cyclic oligosaccharide consisting of seven glucose units and is produced from starch using cyclodextrin glycotransferase enzymes to break the polysaccharide chain and forming a cyclic polysaccharide molecule. The use of β-CD in food research for reduction of cholesterol is increasing due to its affinity for non-polar molecules such as cholesterol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using β-CD in cholesterol removal from pasteurized ewe’s milk Manchego cheese and evaluate the effect on the main components of the milk, lipids, and flavor characteristics. Approximately 97.6% cholesterol reduction was observed in the cheese that was treated using β-CD. Physicochemical properties (fat, moisture and protein) were not changed by the β-CD treatment, except the soluble nitrogen and non-protein nitrogen that showed slight differences after the treatment. The amount of the different components of the lipid fraction (fatty acids, triglycerides and phospholipids) were similar in cheeses treated and not treated with β-CD. Flavor compound and short chain free fatty acids were not mostly significantly influenced by the effect of the β-CD. β-CD molecules are edible and nontoxic and as a result they can be used safely for cholesterol removal processing in cheese manufacturing. Therefore, the present study suggests that β-CD treatment is an effective process for cholesterol removal from Manchego cheese while preserving its properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Additives in Food)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle The Use of Trisodium Citrate to Improve the Textural Properties of Acid-Induced, Transglutaminase-Treated Micellar Casein Gels
Molecules 2018, 23(7), 1632; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23071632
Received: 3 June 2018 / Revised: 30 June 2018 / Accepted: 1 July 2018 / Published: 4 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1943 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, the effect of trisodium citrate on the textural properties and microstructure of acid-induced, transglutaminase-treated micellar casein gels was investigated. Various concentrations of trisodium citrate (0 mmol/L, 10 mmol/L, 20 mmol/L, and 30 mmol/L) were added to micellar casein dispersions. After
[...] Read more.
In this study, the effect of trisodium citrate on the textural properties and microstructure of acid-induced, transglutaminase-treated micellar casein gels was investigated. Various concentrations of trisodium citrate (0 mmol/L, 10 mmol/L, 20 mmol/L, and 30 mmol/L) were added to micellar casein dispersions. After being treated with microbial transglutaminase (mTGase), all dispersions were acidified with 1.3% (w/v) gluconodelta-lactone (GDL) to pH 4.4–4.6. As the concentration of trisodium citrate increased from 0 mmol/L to 30 mmol/L, the firmness and water-holding capacity increased significantly. The final storage modulus (G′) of casein gels was positively related to the concentration of trisodium citrate prior to mTGase treatment of micellar casein dispersions. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy images indicated that more interconnected networks and smaller pores were present in the gels with higher concentrations of trisodium citrate. Overall, when micellar casein dispersions are treated with trisodium citrate prior to mTGase crosslinking, the resulted acid-induced gels are firmer and the syneresis is reduced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Additives in Food)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Urtica spp.: Ordinary Plants with Extraordinary Properties
Molecules 2018, 23(7), 1664; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23071664
Received: 5 June 2018 / Revised: 28 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 9 July 2018
PDF Full-text (299 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nettles (genus Urtica, family Urticaceae) are of considerable interest as preservatives in foods for both human and animal consumption. They have also been used for centuries in traditional medicine. This paper reviews the properties of nettles that make them suitable for wider
[...] Read more.
Nettles (genus Urtica, family Urticaceae) are of considerable interest as preservatives in foods for both human and animal consumption. They have also been used for centuries in traditional medicine. This paper reviews the properties of nettles that make them suitable for wider applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Nettles contain a significant number of biologically-active compounds. For example, the leaves are rich sources of terpenoids, carotenoids and fatty acids, as well as of various essential amino acids, chlorophyll, vitamins, tannins, carbohydrates, sterols, polysaccharides, isolectins and minerals. Extracts from the aerial parts of nettles are rich sources of polyphenols, while the roots contain oleanol acid, sterols and steryl glycosides. Due to the variety of phytochemicals and their proportions they contain, nettles show noticeable activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These properties make nettles suitable for a range of possible applications, including functional food, dietary supplements and pharmacological formulations. Despite these benefits, the nettle is still an underestimated plant source. This paper provides a unique overview of the latest research on nettle plants focusing on the possibilities for transforming a common weed into a commercial plant with a wide range of applications. Special attention is paid to the antimicrobial activity of the active compounds in nettles and to possible uses of these valuable plants in food and feed formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Additives in Food)
Back to Top