Special Issue "Titanium Alloys and Titanium-Based Matrix Composites"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Maciej Motyka
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science/R&D Laboratory for Aerospace Materials, Rzeszow University of Technology, Rzeszow, Poland
Interests: titanium alloys; hot deformation; superplasticity; ultrafine-grained materials, superalloys, directional solidification

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Titanium alloys, thanks to unique physical and chemical properties (mainly high relative strength combined with very good corrosion resistance), are considered as advanced metallic materials. Their development has led to design of several groups of structural alloys, including single-phase: α or β alloys, two-phase α + β alloys—the most popular ones—and TiAl intermetallic alloys. The main application areas of titanium alloys include transportation (mainly aerospace structures), machine building, fuel-energetic industry and medicine. The application of conventional titanium alloys is limited due to their high chemical affinity to atmospheric gases (single α phase alloys can be used up to 600 °C). However, Ti-based intermetallic alloys seems to be promising alternative materials for high temperature use. Obviously, it needs to overcome some technological problems—like low ductility—which have been partially resolved over the last decades. Another important feature of titanium is its remarkable biocompatibility. Especially low Young’s modulus titanium alloys are considered nowadays as valuable biomaterials used for bone implants (including “gum metals”). Titanium alloys are also good materials for metal matrix composites (MMC’s). Their main attractions are high strength and stiffness—dependently on the type of reinforcement.

The range of material applications are also related to modern manufacturing and processing technologies. In case of titanium and its alloys, interesting results were obtained by grain refinement, which causes high strength increase. Pure nanocrystalline titanium is characterized be the strength level very close to solution-strengthened titanium alloys. Moreover, ultrafine-grained titanium alloys exhibit high superplastic deformability. Another developing processing areas worth mentioning are: surface engineering, joining methods (e.g. diffusion bonding or friction stir welding—FSW) and highly promising additive manufacturing (AM) method.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to collect works related to various aspects of research on titanium alloys and Ti-based matrix composites—manufacturing and processing methods and materials characterization. It is my pleasure to invite you to submit manuscripts for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Maciej Motyka
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Titanium alloys
  • Titanium-based intermetallic alloys
  • Titanium-based matrix composites
  • Microstructure development and characterization
  • Mechanical behavior
  • Applications
  • Manufacturing
  • Processing
  • Additive manufacturing
  • Surface engineering

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
Grain Refinement of Ti-15Mo-3Al-2.7Nb-0.2Si Alloy with the Rotation of TiB Whiskers by Powder Metallurgy and Canned Hot Extrusion
Metals 2020, 10(1), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10010126 - 15 Jan 2020
Abstract
In situ synthesized TiB whiskers (TiBw) reinforced Ti-15Mo-3Al-2.7Nb-0.2Si alloys were successfully manufactured by pre-sintering and canned hot extrusion via adding TiB2 powders. During pre-sintering, most TiB2 were reacted with Ti atoms to produce TiB. During extrusion, the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) [...] Read more.
In situ synthesized TiB whiskers (TiBw) reinforced Ti-15Mo-3Al-2.7Nb-0.2Si alloys were successfully manufactured by pre-sintering and canned hot extrusion via adding TiB2 powders. During pre-sintering, most TiB2 were reacted with Ti atoms to produce TiB. During extrusion, the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) of β grains was promoted with the rotation of TiBw, and CDRXed grains were strongly inhibited by TiBw with hindering dislocation motion. Eventually, the grain sizes of composites decreased obviously. Furthermore, the stress transmitted from the matrix to TiBw for strengthening in a tensile test, besides grain refinement. Meanwhile, the fractured TiBw and microcracks around them contributed to fracturing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Titanium Alloys and Titanium-Based Matrix Composites)
Open AccessArticle
Reconstruction of Complex Zygomatic Bone Defects Using Mirroring Coupled with EBM Fabrication of Titanium Implant
Metals 2019, 9(12), 1250; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9121250 - 22 Nov 2019
Abstract
Reconstruction of zygomatic complex defects is a surgical challenge, owing to the accurate restoration of structural symmetry as well as facial projection. Generally, there are many available techniques for zygomatic reconstruction, but they hardly achieve aesthetic and functional properties. To our knowledge, there [...] Read more.
Reconstruction of zygomatic complex defects is a surgical challenge, owing to the accurate restoration of structural symmetry as well as facial projection. Generally, there are many available techniques for zygomatic reconstruction, but they hardly achieve aesthetic and functional properties. To our knowledge, there is no such study on zygomatic titanium bone reconstruction, which involves the complete steps from patient computed tomography scan to the fabrication of titanium zygomatic implant and evaluation of implant accuracy. The objective of this study is to propose an integrated system methodology for the reconstruction of complex zygomatic bony defects using titanium comprising several steps, right from the patient scan to implant fabrication while maintaining proper aesthetic and facial symmetry. The integrated system methodology involves computer-assisted implant design based on the patient computed tomography data, the implant fitting accuracy using three-dimensional comparison techniques, finite element analysis to investigate the biomechanical behavior under loading conditions, and finally titanium fabrication of the zygomatic implant using state-of-the-art electron beam melting technology. The resulting titanium implant has a superior aesthetic appearance and preferable biocompatibility. The customized mirrored implant accurately fit on the defective area and restored the tumor region with inconsequential inconsistency. Moreover, the outcome from the two-dimensional analysis provided a good accuracy within 2 mm as established through physical prototyping. Thus, the designed implant produced faultless fitting, favorable symmetry, and satisfying aesthetics. The simulation results also demonstrated the load resistant ability of the implant with max stress within 1.76 MPa. Certainly, the mirrored and electron beam melted titanium implant can be considered as the practical alternative for a bone substitute of complex zygomatic reconstruction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Titanium Alloys and Titanium-Based Matrix Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Corrosion and Tensile Behaviors of Ti-4Al-2V-1Mo-1Fe and Ti-6Al-4V Titanium Alloys
Metals 2019, 9(11), 1213; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9111213 - 11 Nov 2019
Abstract
X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), immersion, electrochemical, and tensile tests were employed to analyze the phase constitution, microstructure, corrosion behaviors, and tensile properties of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy and a newly-developed low cost titanium alloy Ti-4Al-2V-1Mo-1Fe. The results showed that both the [...] Read more.
X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), immersion, electrochemical, and tensile tests were employed to analyze the phase constitution, microstructure, corrosion behaviors, and tensile properties of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy and a newly-developed low cost titanium alloy Ti-4Al-2V-1Mo-1Fe. The results showed that both the Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-4Al-2V-1Mo-1Fe alloys were composed of α and β phases. The volume fractions of β phase for these two alloys were 7.4% and 47.3%, respectively. The mass losses after 180-day immersion tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution of these alloys were negligible. The corrosion resistance of the Ti-4Al-2V-1Mo-1Fe alloy was higher than that of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The tensile tests showed that the Ti-4Al-2V-1Mo-1Fe alloy presented a slightly higher strength but a lower ductility compared to the Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Titanium Alloys and Titanium-Based Matrix Composites)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Mechanical Behavior and Microstructure Evolution of a Ti-15Mo/TiB Titanium–Matrix Composite during Hot Deformation
Metals 2019, 9(11), 1175; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9111175 - 31 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A Ti-15Mo/TiB titanium–matrix composite (TMC) was produced by spark plasma sintering at 1400 °C under a load of 40 MPa for 15 min using a Ti-14.25(wt.)%Mo-5(wt.)%TiB2 powder mixture. Microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior of the composite were studied during uniaxial compression at [...] Read more.
A Ti-15Mo/TiB titanium–matrix composite (TMC) was produced by spark plasma sintering at 1400 °C under a load of 40 MPa for 15 min using a Ti-14.25(wt.)%Mo-5(wt.)%TiB2 powder mixture. Microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior of the composite were studied during uniaxial compression at room temperature and in a temperature range of 500–1000 °C. At room temperature, the composite showed a combination of high strength (the yield strength was ~1500 MPa) and good ductility (~22%). The microstructure evolution of the Ti-15Mo matrix was associated with the development of dynamic recovery at 500–700 °C and dynamic recrystallization at higher temperatures (≥800 °C). The apparent activation energy of the plastic deformation was calculated and a processing map for the TMC was constructed using the obtained results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Titanium Alloys and Titanium-Based Matrix Composites)
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