Special Issue "Mechanical Failure and Metal Degradation of Ships and Marine Structures"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701). This special issue belongs to the section "Corrosion and Protection".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022 | Viewed by 2278

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Gang Liu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
Interests: ocean engineering; marine structural safety; fatigue; fracture; creepage
Dr. Yunze Xu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
Interests: ocean engineering; corrosion; erosion-corrosion; damage monitoring
Dr. Da-Hai Xia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, China
Interests: corrosion; electrochemistry and surface science
Prof. Dr. Jian Zhang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003, China
Interests: buckling of pressure vessels; integrity of pressure hulls; integral hydrobulging of shells of revolution

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ships and marine structures are constructed by various metallic materials including high-strength steels, stainless steels, copper alloys, titanium alloys and so on. The damage and failure of these metal components directly threaten the safety of ships, ocean platforms, offshore wind power structures, subsea vehicles, subsea pipelines, risers and cross-sea bridges. Due to the wind, wave and current loads in the ocean, ships and marine structures can suffer from serious mechanical failure, including fatigue, fracture, creepage, erosion and buckling. On the other hand, the metal structures can lessen the risks of electrochemical corrosion in seawater, which could induce the degradation of ships and marine structures. Furthermore, the synergy of the mechanical load and the corrosion (including but not limited to stress corrosion, erosion-corrosion, tribo-corrosion and corrosion fatigue) could lead to the quick failure of the ships and marine structures. As a result, detecting the metal damage and understanding the failure mechanism of metals caused by both mechanical load and electrochemical corrosion in complex marine environments are crucial for early warnings and the protection of ships and marine structures.

Prof. Dr. Gang Liu
Dr. Yunze Xu
Dr. Da-Hai Xia
Prof. Dr. Jian Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • ships and marine structures
  • marine metals
  • marine environment
  • mechanical failure
  • corrosion
  • synergy
  • damage monitoring

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Article
Strength Prediction of Spherical Electronic Cabins with Pitting Corrosion
Metals 2022, 12(7), 1120; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12071120 - 29 Jun 2022
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Abstract
In this paper, strength prediction of spherical electronic cabins with pitting corrosion under external pressure was investigated. The finite element model of a spherical electronic cabin with random pitting was established using self-written code. The effects of the pitting distribution shape, pitting morphology [...] Read more.
In this paper, strength prediction of spherical electronic cabins with pitting corrosion under external pressure was investigated. The finite element model of a spherical electronic cabin with random pitting was established using self-written code. The effects of the pitting distribution shape, pitting morphology and size on the ultimate buckling load were numerically studied. In addition, the analytical formula for predicting the ultimate load of spherical cabin with random pitting corrosion was proposed and verified by experiments. This study can be used by engineering designers for relevant design and evaluation basis and provides a reference for the development of a new design code for the buckling stability of spherical cabins with pitting corrosion. Full article
Article
Effect of Residual Stress on Hydrogen Diffusion in Thick Butt-Welded High-Strength Steel Plates
Metals 2022, 12(7), 1074; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12071074 - 23 Jun 2022
Viewed by 238
Abstract
Thick high-strength steel plates are increasingly being used for ship structures. Moreover, hydrogen enters the process of manufacturing and service, and large residual tensile stress occurs near the weld. Such stress can facilitate the diffusion and accumulation of hydrogen in the material, leading [...] Read more.
Thick high-strength steel plates are increasingly being used for ship structures. Moreover, hydrogen enters the process of manufacturing and service, and large residual tensile stress occurs near the weld. Such stress can facilitate the diffusion and accumulation of hydrogen in the material, leading to hydrogen embrittlement fracture of the shell. Therefore, residual-stress-induced diffusion and accumulation of hydrogen in the stress concentration region of thick butt-welded high-strength steel plate structures need to be studied. In this study, manual metal arc welding was realized by numerical simulation of residual stress in a thick butt-welded high-strength steel plate model using the thermoelastic–plastic theory and a double ellipsoidal heat source model. To analyze residual stress, a set of numerical simulation methods was obtained through comparative analysis of the test results of relevant literature. Residual and hydrostatic stress distributions were determined based on these methods. Then, hydrogen diffusion parameters in each region of the model were obtained through experimental tests. Finally, the results of the residual stress field were used as the predefined field of hydrogen diffusion to conduct a numerical simulation analysis. The distribution of hydrogen diffusion under the influence of residual stress was obtained based on the theory of stress-induced hydrogen diffusion. The weak area of the welding joint was found to be near the weld toe, which exhibited high hydrostatic stress and hydrogen concentration. Further, the maximum hydrogen concentration value of the vertical weld path was approximately 6.1 ppm, and the maximum value of the path parallel to the weld centerline and 31 mm away from the weld centerline was approximately 6.22 ppm. Finally, the hydrostatic tensile stress in the vertical weld path was maximized (~345 MPa), degrading the material properties and causing hydrogen-related cracking. Hence, a reliable method for the analysis of hydrogen diffusion according to residual stress in thick high-strength steel plates was obtained. This work could provide a research basis for controlling and eliminating the adverse effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of ship structures and ensuring the safe service of marine equipment. Full article
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Article
Influence of Partial Rust Layer on the Passivation and Chloride-Induced Corrosion of Q235b Steel in the Carbonated Simulated Concrete Pore Solution
Metals 2022, 12(7), 1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12071064 - 21 Jun 2022
Viewed by 238
Abstract
A partial pre-rusted wire beam electrode (WBE) was designed to study the influence of the rust layer on rebar corrosion in the carbonated simulated concrete pore solution (SCPS). The results show that the passive film generated on the pre-rusted steel area is more [...] Read more.
A partial pre-rusted wire beam electrode (WBE) was designed to study the influence of the rust layer on rebar corrosion in the carbonated simulated concrete pore solution (SCPS). The results show that the passive film generated on the pre-rusted steel area is more fragile than that formed on the fine polished steel area in carbonaceous media. Nevertheless, the pitting corrosion resulting from the presence of chloride ions still tends to occur on the fine polished steel surface due to the local acidification process being hindered by the rust layer. The rust layer could play a more important role than the passive film in inhibiting the initiation of chloride-induced corrosion on rebar. The expansion path of the corrosion product would be blocked by the rust layer, leading to the pit propagating in the fine polished region. Furthermore, the growth of pitting corrosion is greatly accelerated due to the catalytic cathodic reaction of the rust layer. Full article
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Article
Ductile Fracture Prediction of X80 Pipeline Steel Using Void Growth Model
Metals 2022, 12(6), 923; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12060923 - 27 May 2022
Viewed by 319
Abstract
In this study, the Void Growth Model (VGM) is employed to predict the ductile fracture of X80 pipeline steel. The X80 pipeline tends to be applied in challenging scenarios, such as extremely deep water and long-distance pipelines, which might cause a ductile fracture; [...] Read more.
In this study, the Void Growth Model (VGM) is employed to predict the ductile fracture of X80 pipeline steel. The X80 pipeline tends to be applied in challenging scenarios, such as extremely deep water and long-distance pipelines, which might cause a ductile fracture; however, the study of ductile fractures for pipeline steel is rare, especially for X80 pipeline steel. To understand ductile fractures of X80 pipeline steel, a hybrid numerical–experimental calibration method is used to determine the fracture parameter for the VGM model. The toughness capacity defined by the critical void growth index (VGI) in this study is determined to be 4.304. A shear-tension specimen is applied to verify the calibrated VGM. The results show that the calibrated VGM can predict the fracture initiation of the shear-tension specimen. In addition, the fracture of the shear-tension specimen initiates at the center of the section and propagates to the edge of the groove of the specimen. The initiation of fracture is identical to the testing observation. Full article
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Article
Influence of Surface Pretreatments on the Anticorrosion of Polypyrrole Electro-Polymerized Coatings for Copper in Artificial Seawater
Metals 2022, 12(3), 383; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12030383 - 23 Feb 2022
Viewed by 336
Abstract
Plasma discharging treatment (hydroxylation) was conducted on copper surfaces for the subsequent electro-polymerization procedure of polypyrrole (PPy) coating (d-PPy). The hydroxylated surface could solve the criticized adhesion strength and protection efficiency of electropolymerized coatings for metal substrate in corrosive media. Compared with the [...] Read more.
Plasma discharging treatment (hydroxylation) was conducted on copper surfaces for the subsequent electro-polymerization procedure of polypyrrole (PPy) coating (d-PPy). The hydroxylated surface could solve the criticized adhesion strength and protection efficiency of electropolymerized coatings for metal substrate in corrosive media. Compared with the counterpart obtained via passivation pretreatment (p-PPy), a well-adhered d-PPy layer was acquired on the hydroxylated copper surface, which earned a satisfactory adhesion grade, compactness and conductivity. Appreciable protection of d-PPy was measured for copper in the artificial seawater (ASW) at 298 K via electrochemical and surface analyses. Results of electrochemical measurements indicated that d-PPy coating effectively retarded copper corrosion in ASW with a lowered corrosion current density and improved charge transfer resistance. Surface analysis revealed that the typical morphology of PPy was retained after 240 h immersion in ASW. A favorable physical barrier and anodic protection efficacy might account for the superior protection of d-PPy coating for the underlying copper. Molecular dynamics simulations for the deposition of PPy chains on pristine and hydroxylated copper planes provided a definite correlation between the theoretical calculations and experimental observations. Theoretical modelling also disclosed in-depth the anchoring nature and anticorrosive mechanism for PPy toward the hydroxylated copper in ASW. Full article
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Article
Buckling Analysis of Corroded Pipelines under Combined Axial Force and External Pressure
Metals 2022, 12(2), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12020308 - 10 Feb 2022
Viewed by 320
Abstract
Affected by a complex environment, corrosion is a common defect in steel pipelines. Moreover, steel pipelines are subjected to large axial forces during their installation and operation. Corroded deep-sea steel pipelines are prone to local buckling under complex loads. Therefore, in view of [...] Read more.
Affected by a complex environment, corrosion is a common defect in steel pipelines. Moreover, steel pipelines are subjected to large axial forces during their installation and operation. Corroded deep-sea steel pipelines are prone to local buckling under complex loads. Therefore, in view of this problem, the collapse response of corroded steel pipelines under the combined axial force and external pressure is analyzed in detail. First, a formula for evaluating the collapse pressure of corroded steel pipelines under external pressure and axial force is proposed. Then, the factors affecting the collapse pressure of the steel pipeline are parameterized by using the finite element method. The accuracy of the finite element model is proved by collapse tests of the corroded steel pipeline. As shown in finite element results, the diameter-to-thickness ratio, initial ovality and corrosion defect size have significant effects on the buckling response of a steel pipeline. The collapse pressure of the steel pipeline decreases as the axial force increases. Finally, based on the finite element simulation results, the parameter variables in the evaluation formula are obtained. Full article
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