Innovation in Material and Design of Underwater Structures

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2024) | Viewed by 3928

Special Issue Editors

College of Engineering Science and Technology, Shanghai Ocean University, No.999, Hucheng Huan Road, Shanghai 201306, China
Interests: submersible structures; fatigue of ships and marine structures; ultimate strength of ships and marine structures
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Guest Editor
Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Manufacture and Process for Marine Mechanical Equipment, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003, China
Interests: underwater equipment biomimetic technology; modern design theory and methods of marine equipment, submersibles; pressure-resistant structures; buckling
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Guest Editor
School of Safety and Ocean Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249, China
Interests: interface fracture mechanics; composite material mechanics; reliability and failure analysis of marine structures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the exploration of underwater resources set unprecedented requirements for the performance of underwater structural systems. The invention of new materials and the improvement of structural manufacturing technology have provided more possibilities for the design of novel structures. Aluminum alloys, high-strength steels, titanium alloys, and various anti-corrosion and anti-fouling coatings are widely used in underwater structures. People are also constantly exploring the application of acrylic materials, ceramic materials, carbon fiber materials, and solid buoyancy materials, as well as safety design methods that match structural functions. Furthermore, the application of new materials and structures should be based on in-depth mechanism research related to performance dimensions such as strength, stability, fatigue, creep, etc. This Special Issue aims to promote knowledge and publish new findings on all types of research related to innovation in the material and design of underwater structures. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The design method and theoretical analysis of underwater structures;
  • The reliability and risk analysis of underwater application of new design and new materials;
  • Multi-objective structure optimization;
  • The application of lightweight materials, anti-corrosion materials , super high temperature or super low temperature resistant materials, and intelligent materials in underwater structures and equipment;
  • Material degradation during service;
  • The strength, fatigue, creep and stability analysis of new-type underwater structures.

Dr. Fang Wang
Prof. Dr. Jian Zhang
Dr. Yu Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • underwater structures
  • structure design
  • structure optimization
  • reliability
  • lightweight materials
  • intelligent materials
  • structure performance

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 8305 KiB  
Article
Compressive Behavior of Stainless Steel–Concrete–Carbon Steel Double-Skin Tubular (SCCDST) Members Subjected to External Hydraulic Pressure
by Jian-Tao Wang, Kai-Lin Yang and Jia-Yao Sun
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(3), 406; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12030406 - 26 Feb 2024
Viewed by 661
Abstract
The new-type stainless steel–concrete–carbon steel double-skin tubular (SCCDST) members, characterized by their exceptional corrosion resistance and mechanical bearing capacity, have promising applications in ocean engineering, particularly in deep-water engineering. The external hydraulic pressure and interfacial action of various materials intensify the complexity of [...] Read more.
The new-type stainless steel–concrete–carbon steel double-skin tubular (SCCDST) members, characterized by their exceptional corrosion resistance and mechanical bearing capacity, have promising applications in ocean engineering, particularly in deep-water engineering. The external hydraulic pressure and interfacial action of various materials intensify the complexity of composite performance of SCCDST members. This paper describes an analytical investigation on the concentric compressive performance of SCCDST members under external hydraulic pressure. The full-range mechanism, including load–displacement response, bearing capacity contribution, and contact pressures, was investigated through the finite element (FE) model that was validated by the failure mode, bearing capacity, and response of axial load versus strain. Subsequently, influences of key geometric–physical parameters were analyzed, e.g., diameter-to-thickness ratios (Do/to, Di/ti), material strengths (fyo, fyi, and fc), hollow ratios (χ), and water depths (H). Typical results indicate that: the initial active confinement action derived from the hydraulic pressure can enhance the interfacial contact pressure and axial compression capacity of SCCDST members due to the tri-axial compression state; the enhancement of confinement effect is mainly from the interfacial interaction between outer stainless steel tube and concrete infill; influence of water depth on bearing capacity cannot be ignored, e.g., the bearing capacity of an SCCDST member with larger hollow ratio (χ = 0.849) is not enhanced under a higher hydraulic pressure (H = 900 m) because of the cross-sectional buckling failure risk. Finally, a modified method considering the effect of water depth was proposed and verified for SCCDST members under hydraulic pressure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Material and Design of Underwater Structures)
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15 pages, 7257 KiB  
Article
Numerical Simulation and Design of a Shaftless Hollow Pump for Plankton Sampling
by Shizhen Gao, Zhihua Fan, Jie Mao, Minhui Zheng and Junyi Yang
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(2), 284; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12020284 - 4 Feb 2024
Viewed by 854
Abstract
It is important to marine ecology research that plankton samples are collected without damage, especially for time series samples. Usually, most fixed-point plankton samplers are made using a pump with paddle blades in order to increase the flow rate. But it can easily [...] Read more.
It is important to marine ecology research that plankton samples are collected without damage, especially for time series samples. Usually, most fixed-point plankton samplers are made using a pump with paddle blades in order to increase the flow rate. But it can easily injure soft plankton. In this paper, a shaftless hollow sampling pump is designed, which can provide a highly efficient driving component for the plankton sampler. The numerical model of the sampling pump is established, and the flow rate of the sampling pump at different rotational speeds is simulated by the computational fluid dynamics method. In order to obtain a higher flow rate, the influence of internal and external cavity size, blade angle, and blade number on the flow rate of the sampling pump with a constant rotational speed of the blade was simulated and discussed. The results show that the flow rate at the internal cavity is positively correlated with the inlet and outlet pressure differences of the internal cavity, and the greater the negative pressure at the outlet of the internal cavity, the greater the flow rate. When the internal and external cavity sizes are h = 14 mm, d = 52 mm, blade angle θ = 45°, and number of blades s = 5, the flow rate of the sampling pump internal cavity reaches the maximum. Finally, the feasibility of the shaftless hollow sampling pump is verified by experiments. The shaftless hollow sampling pump can realize non-destructive sampling of plankton. This paper presents a theoretical design foundation for a new non-destructive siphon sampling method for marine plankton, which is of great significance for marine plankton sampling and subsequent research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Material and Design of Underwater Structures)
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18 pages, 9523 KiB  
Article
Wrinkling of Toroidal Shells in Free Hydroforming
by Xiaobin Liu, Jian Zhang, Ming Zhan, Xilu Zhao, Wenwei Wu and Kaiwei Xu
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(1), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12010089 - 1 Jan 2024
Viewed by 959
Abstract
In this study, we investigated toroidal shell wrinkling in free hydroforming. We specifically focused on toroidal shells with a regular hexagonal cross-section. Membrane theory was used to examine the distribution of stress and yield load in both preform and toroidal shells. The wrinkling [...] Read more.
In this study, we investigated toroidal shell wrinkling in free hydroforming. We specifically focused on toroidal shells with a regular hexagonal cross-section. Membrane theory was used to examine the distribution of stress and yield load in both preform and toroidal shells. The wrinkling moment was then predicted using an empirical formula of shell buckling. In addition, the wrinkling state was investigated using a general statics method, and the free hydroforming of toroidal shells was simulated using the Riks method. Subsequently, nonlinear buckling and equilibrium paths were analyzed. A toroidal preform was manufactured, and free hydroforming experiments were conducted. Overall, the experimental results confirmed the accuracy of the theoretical predictions and numerical simulations. This indicates that the prediction method used in the study was effective. We also found that wrinkling occurs during hydroforming in the inner region of toroidal shells due to compressive stress. Consequently, we improved the structure of the toroidal shells and performed analytical calculations and numerical simulations for the analysis. Our results indicate that wrinkling can be eliminated by increasing the number of segments on the inner side of toroidal preforms, thereby improving the quality of toroidal shells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Material and Design of Underwater Structures)
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