Special Issue "Novel Materials Synthesis by Mechanical Alloying/Milling"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Manufacturing Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Lluïsa Escoda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departament de Física, Universitat de Girona, Catalonia, Spain
Interests: nanocrystalline materials, mechanical alloying, thermal analysis, XRD structural analysis, shape memory
Prof. Joan-Josep Suñol
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of Girona, Catalonia, Spain
Interests: nanocrystalline materials, mechanical alloying, thermal analysis, XRD structural analysis, shape memory
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The mechanical alloying/milling (MA/MM) technique has been applied to the production of advanced materials such as oxide dispersion-strengthened, amorphous, nanocrystalline, extended solid solutions, metastable phases, new ceramic, metallic, composite materials, pharmaceutical products. In this Special Issue, the main objective is to present recent results of the synthesis of new materials with mechanical and/or functional improved properties. The materials are produced directly by mechanical alloying/milling or by combining this technique with other synthesis techniques (spark plasma sintering, HVOF, additive manufacturing, consolidation, and sintering) in order to produce bulk alloys, composites, surface layers, or foams. Likewise, production parameters such as the milling time, the milling intensity, the filling factor, the addition of a process control agent, the milling atmosphere, contamination from the milling tools, the milling temperature, or the selection of the precursors determine the final microstructure of the powdered materials developed by mechanical alloying. This Special Issue is also open to the following articles linked to MA/MM: (a) the simulation, (b) the mechanical and/or thermodynamic modelling of the process, (c) the influence of milling parameters, (d) a comparison of milling devices, (e) a comparison between the microstruture and properties of materials produced by mechanical alloying/milling or by other techniques, or (f) review papers on an specific topic, which take into account that the objective of the technique is its application to the synthesis of materials.   

Prof. Lluïsa Escoda
Prof. Joan-Josep Suñol
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advanced materials
  • functional properties
  • powder metallurgy
  • new materials synthesis
  • modelling
  • milling devices
  • simulation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Influence of Milling Time on the Homogeneity and Magnetism of a Fe70Zr30 Partially Amorphous Alloy: Distribution of Curie Temperatures
Materials 2020, 13(2), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020490 - 20 Jan 2020
Abstract
In this work, the mechanically alloyed Fe70Zr30 (at. %) composition has been used to study the influence of milling time on its homogeneity and magnetic properties. The microstructure and Fe environment results show the formation of an almost fully amorphous [...] Read more.
In this work, the mechanically alloyed Fe70Zr30 (at. %) composition has been used to study the influence of milling time on its homogeneity and magnetic properties. The microstructure and Fe environment results show the formation of an almost fully amorphous alloy after 50 h of milling in a mixture of pure 70 at. % Fe and 30 at. % Zr. The soft magnetic behavior of the samples enhances with the increase of the milling time, which is ascribed to the averaging out of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy as the crystal size decreases and the amorphous fraction increases. The formation of a non-perfectly homogenous system leads to a certain compositional heterogeneity, motivating the existence of a distribution of Curie temperatures. The parameters of the distribution (the average Curie temperature, T C ¯ , and the broadening of the distribution, T C ) have been obtained using a recently reported procedure, based on the analysis of the approach towards the saturation curves and the magnetocaloric effect. The decrease of T C and the increase of T C ¯ with the milling time are in agreement with the microstructural results. As the remaining α-Fe phase decreases, the amorphous matrix is enriched in Fe atoms, enhancing its magnetic response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Materials Synthesis by Mechanical Alloying/Milling)
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