Special Issue "High Performance Concrete"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction and Building Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sukhoon Pyo
Website
Guest Editor
Ulsan National Institute of Sciences and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan, Korea
Interests: ultra high performance concrete; sound-absorbable high performance concrete; railway; composites; sustainable construction materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Concrete has traditionally been the subject of many researchers’ attention, being a widely used material in the construction sector. As the technology of concrete improves, various kinds of high performance concrete have recently been developed and used. This Special Issue focuses on the various types of “High Performance Concrete” and their applications, which will be published in Materials, an interdisciplinary journal dedicated to covering leading research and developments in the field of materials science and engineering. This Special Issue encompasses the field of advanced concrete- and/or cement-based composites and their structural applications. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following: high performance concrete; ultra high performance concrete; sound-absorbable high performance concrete; sustainable construction materials; self-compacting concrete; engineered cementitious composites; highly durable concrete; ultra-lightweight concrete; high strength–high ductility concrete; and structural applications.

Please consider this invitation to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Sukhoon Pyo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • high performance concrete
  • ultra high performance concrete
  • sound-absorbable high performance concrete
  • sustainable construction materials
  • self-compacting concrete
  • engineered cementitious composites
  • highly durable concrete
  • ultra-lightweight concrete
  • high strength–high ductility concrete
  • structural applications of high performance concrete

Published Papers (13 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Porous Cementitious Materials Using Microscopic Image Processing and X-ray CT Analysis
Materials 2020, 13(14), 3105; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13143105 (registering DOI) - 12 Jul 2020
Abstract
The use of lightweight concrete has continuously increased because it has a primary benefit of reducing dead load in a concrete infrastructure. Various properties of lightweight concrete, such as compressive strength, elastic modulus, sound absorption performance, and thermal insulation, are highly related to [...] Read more.
The use of lightweight concrete has continuously increased because it has a primary benefit of reducing dead load in a concrete infrastructure. Various properties of lightweight concrete, such as compressive strength, elastic modulus, sound absorption performance, and thermal insulation, are highly related to its pore characteristics. Consequently, the identification of the characteristics of its pores is an important task. This study performs a comparative analysis for characterizing the pores in cementitious materials using three different testing methods: a water absorption test, microscopic image processing, and X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) analysis. For all 12 porous cementitious materials, conventional water absorption test was conducted to obtain their water permeable porosities. Using the microscopic image processing method, various characteristics of pores were identified in terms of the 2D pore ratio (i.e., ratio of pore area to total surface area), the pore size, and the number of pores in the cross-sectional area. The 3D tomographic image-based X-ray CT analysis was conducted for the selected samples to show the 3D pore ratio (i.e., ratio of pore volume to total volume), the pore size, the spatial distribution of pores along the height direction of specimen, and open and closed pores. Based on the experimental results, the relationships of oven-dried density with these porosities were identified. Research findings revealed that the complementary use of these testing methods is beneficial for analyzing the characteristics of pores in cementitious materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Reactive Powder Concrete Containing Basalt Fibers: Strength, Abrasion and Porosity
Materials 2020, 13(13), 2948; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13132948 - 01 Jul 2020
Abstract
The paper presents the test results of basalt fiber impact on a compressive and flexural strength, resistance to abrasion and porosity of Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC). The reasons for testing were interesting mechanical properties of basalt fibers, the significant tensile strength and flexural [...] Read more.
The paper presents the test results of basalt fiber impact on a compressive and flexural strength, resistance to abrasion and porosity of Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC). The reasons for testing were interesting mechanical properties of basalt fibers, the significant tensile strength and flexural strength, and in particular the resistance to high temperatures, as well as a relatively small number of RPC tests performed with those fibers and different opinions regarding the impact of those fibers on concrete strength. The composition of the concrete mix was optimized to obtain the highest packing density of particles in the composite, based on the optimum particle size distribution curve acc. to Funk. Admixture of basalt fibers was used in quantity 2, 3, 6, 8 and 10 kg/m3, length 12 mm and diameter 18 µm. A low water-to-binder ratio, i.e., from 0.24, was obtained through application of a polycarboxylate-based superplasticizer. The introduction of up to 10 kg/m3 of basalt fibers to RPC mix was proved to be possible, while keeping the same w/c ratio equal to 0.24, with a slight loss of workability of the concrete mix as the content of fibers increased. It was found that the increase of the fiber content in RPC to 10 kg/m3, despite the w/c ratio was kept the same, caused reduction of the concrete compressive strength by 18.2%, 7.8% and 13.6%, after 2, 7, and 28 days respectively. Whereas, the flexural strength of RPC increased gradually (maximum by 15.9%), along with the fiber quantity increase up to 6 kg/m3, and then it reduced (maximum by 17.7%), as the fiber content in the concrete was further increased. The reduction of RPC compressive strength, along with the increase in basalt fibers content, leads to the increase of the total porosity, as well as the change in pore volume distribution. The reduction of RPC abrasion resistance was demonstrated along with the increase of basalt fibers content, which was explained by the compressive strength reduction of that concrete. A linear relation between the RPC abrasion resistance and the compressive strength involves a high determination coefficient equal to 0.97. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Pre-Wetted Zeolite Sands on the Autogenous Shrinkage and Strength of Ultra-High-Performance Concrete
Materials 2020, 13(10), 2356; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13102356 - 20 May 2020
Abstract
In this study, the carrier effect of zeolite sands in reducing the autogenous shrinkage and optimizing the microstructure of ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) is studied. Pre-wetted calcined zeolite sand (CZ), calcined at 500 °C for 30 min, and natural zeolite sand (NZ), with 15 [...] Read more.
In this study, the carrier effect of zeolite sands in reducing the autogenous shrinkage and optimizing the microstructure of ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) is studied. Pre-wetted calcined zeolite sand (CZ), calcined at 500 °C for 30 min, and natural zeolite sand (NZ), with 15 wt.% and 30 wt.% in UHPC, are used to partially replace standard sands. On that basis, a series of experiments are executed on the developed UHPC, including compressive strength, autogenous shrinkage, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and isothermal calorimetry experiments. With the increase of the zeolite sand content, the autogenous shrinkage of UHPC decreases gradually. Moreover, when the added CZ content is 30 wt.% (CZ30 specimen), it is effective in reducing autogenous shrinkage. Meanwhile, at the age of 28 days, the compressive strength of CZ30 is 97% of the control group. In summary, it is possible to effectively reduce the autogenous shrinkage of UHPC containing 30 wt.% CZ, without sacrificing its mechanical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Modeling and Design of SHPB to Characterize Brittle Materials under Compression for High Strain Rates
Materials 2020, 13(9), 2191; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13092191 - 10 May 2020
Abstract
This paper presents an analytical prediction coupled with numerical simulations of a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) that could be used during further experiments to measure the dynamic compression strength of concrete. The current study combines experimental, modeling and numerical results, permitting an [...] Read more.
This paper presents an analytical prediction coupled with numerical simulations of a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) that could be used during further experiments to measure the dynamic compression strength of concrete. The current study combines experimental, modeling and numerical results, permitting an inverse method by which to validate measurements. An analytical prediction is conducted to determine the waves propagation present in SHPB using a one-dimensional theory and assuming a strain rate dependence of the material strength. This method can be used by designers of new SPHB experimental setups to predict compressive strength or strain rates reached during tests, or to check the consistencies of predicted results. Numerical simulation results obtained using LS-DYNA finite element software are also presented in this paper, and are used to compare the predictions with the analytical results. This work focuses on an SPHB setup that can accurately identify the strain rate sensitivities of concrete or brittle materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effective Bio-Slime Coating Technique for Concrete Surfaces under Sulfate Attack
Materials 2020, 13(7), 1512; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13071512 - 26 Mar 2020
Abstract
The service life of concretes exposed to sulfate decreases as the concrete body expands due to the formation of gypsum and ettringite. Bacteria-based repair coating layers, which have been studied lately, are aerobic and very effective on the sulfate attack. In this study, [...] Read more.
The service life of concretes exposed to sulfate decreases as the concrete body expands due to the formation of gypsum and ettringite. Bacteria-based repair coating layers, which have been studied lately, are aerobic and very effective on the sulfate attack. In this study, bio-slime repair coating layers were fabricated using bacteria, and chloride diffusion experiments were performed. In addition, the service life of concrete under sulfate attack was evaluated using time-dependent diffusivity and a multi-layer technique. Chloride diffusivity was compared with sulfate diffusivity based on literature review, and the results were used to consider the reduction in the diffusion coefficient. In the analysis results, the service life of concrete was evaluated to be 38.5 years without bio-slime coating layer, but it was increased to 41.5–54.3 years using it. In addition, when the thickness of the bio-slime coating layer is 2.0 mm, the service life can be increased by 1.31–2.15 times if the sulfate diffusion coefficient of the layer is controlled at a level of 0.1 ~ 0.3 × 10−12 m2/s. Eco-friendly and aerobic bio-slime coating layers are expected to effectively resist sulfate under appropriate construction conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Compressive Behavior Characteristics of High-Performance Slurry-Infiltrated Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites (SIFRCCs) under Uniaxial Compressive Stress
Materials 2020, 13(1), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13010159 - 01 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The compressive stress of concrete is used as a design variable for reinforced concrete structures in design standards. However, as the performance-based design is being used with increasing varieties and strengths of concrete and reinforcement bars, mechanical properties other than the compressive stress [...] Read more.
The compressive stress of concrete is used as a design variable for reinforced concrete structures in design standards. However, as the performance-based design is being used with increasing varieties and strengths of concrete and reinforcement bars, mechanical properties other than the compressive stress of concrete are sometimes used as major design variables. In particular, the evaluation of the mechanical properties of concrete is crucial when using fiber-reinforced concrete. Studies of high volume fractions in established compressive behavior prediction equations are insufficient compared to studies of conventional fiber-reinforced concrete. Furthermore, existing prediction equations for the mechanical properties of high-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composite and high-strength concrete have limitations in terms of the strength and characteristics of contained fibers (diameter, length, volume fraction) even though the stress-strain relationship is determined by these factors. Therefore, this study developed a high-performance slurry-infiltrated fiber-reinforced cementitious composite that could prevent the fiber ball phenomenon, a disadvantage of conventional fiber-reinforced concrete, and maximize the fiber volume fraction. Then, the behavior characteristics under compressive stress were analyzed for fiber volume fractions of 4%, 5%, and 6%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Tensile Behavior Characteristics of High-Performance Slurry-Infiltrated Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composite with Respect to Fiber Volume Fraction
Materials 2019, 12(20), 3335; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12203335 - 13 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Concrete has high compressive strength, but low tensile strength, bending strength, toughness, low resistance to cracking, and brittle fracture characteristics. To overcome these problems, fiber-reinforced concrete, in which the strength of concrete is improved by inserting fibers, is being used. Recently, high-performance fiber-reinforced [...] Read more.
Concrete has high compressive strength, but low tensile strength, bending strength, toughness, low resistance to cracking, and brittle fracture characteristics. To overcome these problems, fiber-reinforced concrete, in which the strength of concrete is improved by inserting fibers, is being used. Recently, high-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (HPFRCCs) have been extensively researched. The disadvantages of conventional concrete such as low tensile stress, strain capacity, and energy absorption capacity, have been overcome using HPFRCCs, but they have a weakness in that the fiber reinforcement has only 2% fiber volume fraction. In this study, slurry infiltrated fiber reinforced cementitious composites (SIFRCCs), which can maximize the fiber volume fraction (up to 8%), was developed, and an experimental study on the tensile behavior of SIFRCCs with varying fiber volume fractions (4%, 5%, and 6%) was carried out through direct tensile tests. The results showed that the specimen with high fiber volume fraction exhibited high direct tensile strength and improved brittleness. As per the results, the direct tensile strength is approximately 15.5 MPa, and the energy absorption capacity was excellent. Furthermore, the bridging effect of steel fibers induced strain hardening behavior and multiple cracks, which increased the direct tensile strength and energy absorption capacity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Experimental Study on the Shrinkage Behavior and Mechanical Properties of AAM Mortar Mixed with CSA Expansive Additive
Materials 2019, 12(20), 3312; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12203312 - 11 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
In this study, a calcium sulfoaluminate-based expansive additive (0%, 2.5%, 5.0%, and 7.5% by the mass of the binder) was added to compensate for the shrinkage of alkali-activated material (AAM) mortar. Modulus of elasticity curves based on the ACI 209 model were derived [...] Read more.
In this study, a calcium sulfoaluminate-based expansive additive (0%, 2.5%, 5.0%, and 7.5% by the mass of the binder) was added to compensate for the shrinkage of alkali-activated material (AAM) mortar. Modulus of elasticity curves based on the ACI 209 model were derived for the AAM mortar mixed with the additive by measuring the compressive strength and modulus of elasticity. Moreover, autogenous shrinkage and total shrinkage were measured for 150 days, and drying shrinkage was calculated by excluding autogenous shrinkage from total shrinkage. For the autogenous and drying shrinkage of AAM mortar, shrinkage curves by age were obtained by deriving material constants using the exponential function model. Finally, shrinkage stress was calculated using the modulus of elasticity of the AAM mortar and the curves obtained using the shrinkage model. The results showed that the calcium sulfoaluminate-based expansive additive had an excellent compensation effect on the drying shrinkage of AAM mortar, but the effect was observed only at early ages when the modulus of elasticity was low. From a long-term perspective, the shrinkage compensation effect was low when the modulus of elasticity was high, and thus, shrinkage stress could not be reduced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effects of a Short Heat Treatment Period on the Pullout Resistance of Shape Memory Alloy Fibers in Mortar
Materials 2019, 12(14), 2278; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12142278 - 16 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The feasibility of the crack closure of cementitious composites reinforced with shape memory alloy (SMA) fibers was investigated by performing single-fiber pullout tests. To demonstrate the fast crack closing ability, in this study, a heat treatment (300 °C) was applied for a short [...] Read more.
The feasibility of the crack closure of cementitious composites reinforced with shape memory alloy (SMA) fibers was investigated by performing single-fiber pullout tests. To demonstrate the fast crack closing ability, in this study, a heat treatment (300 °C) was applied for a short time (10 min). A short heat treatment was applied for 10 min, after the slip reached 0.5 mm, to activate the shape memory effects of cold-drawn SMA fibers. Two types of alloys were investigated, NiTi and NiTiNb, with two geometries, either smooth or dog-bone-shaped. During the heat treatment, the pullout stress of the SMA fibers initially decreased due to thermal extension, and then increased after heating for 1–3 min, resulting from the shape memory effects. However, their pullout stress recovery during and after the heat treatment was different for the different alloys and fiber geometries. The NiTi fibers generally produced a higher and faster recovery in terms of their pullout stress than the NiTiNb fibers, while the dog-bone-shaped fibers showed a faster pullout stress recovery than the smooth fibers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Steel Fiber Tensile Strengths and Aspect Ratios on the Fracture Properties of High-Strength Concrete
Materials 2019, 12(13), 2105; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12132105 - 30 Jun 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Steel fiber embedded in concrete serves to reduce crack development and prevent crack growth at the macroscopic level of the concrete matrix. Steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) with high compressive concrete strength is affected primarily by the dimensions, shape, content, aspect ratio, and tensile [...] Read more.
Steel fiber embedded in concrete serves to reduce crack development and prevent crack growth at the macroscopic level of the concrete matrix. Steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) with high compressive concrete strength is affected primarily by the dimensions, shape, content, aspect ratio, and tensile strength of the embedded steel fiber. In this study, double-ended hook steel fiber was used in SFRC with a concrete compressive strength of 80 MPa. This fiber was used for the study variables with two aspect ratios (64, 80) and tensile strength values up to 1600 MPa. The flexural performance of the SFRC specimens was evaluated using crack mouth open displacement tests, and the test results were compared with code provisions. A modified reinforcement index was also used to quantify the flexural performance based on comparisons with fracture energy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Na2O Content and Ms (SiO2/Na2O) of Alkaline Activator on Workability and Setting of Alkali-Activated Slag Paste
Materials 2019, 12(13), 2072; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12132072 - 27 Jun 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The performance of alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste using activators of strong alkali components is affected by the type, composition, and dosage of the alkaline activators. Promoting the reaction of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) by alkaline activators can produce high-strength AAS concrete, [...] Read more.
The performance of alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste using activators of strong alkali components is affected by the type, composition, and dosage of the alkaline activators. Promoting the reaction of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) by alkaline activators can produce high-strength AAS concrete, but the workability might be drastically reduced. This study is aimed to experimentally investigate the heat release, workability, and setting time of AAS pastes and the compressive strength of AAS mortars considering the Na2O content and the ratio of Na2O to SiO2 (Ms) of binary alkaline activators blended with sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate. The test results indicated that the AAS mortars exhibited a high strength of 25 MPa at 24 h, even at ambient temperature, even though the pastes with an Na2O content of ≥6% and an Ms of ≥1.0 exhibited an abrupt decrease in flowability and rapid setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Behavior of Colloidal Nanosilica in an Ultrahigh Performance Concrete Environment Using Dynamic Light Scattering
Materials 2019, 12(12), 1976; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12121976 - 19 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The dispersion quality of nanosilica (NS) is an essential parameter to influence and control the material characteristics of nanosilica-enhanced concrete. In this research, the dispersion quality of colloidal nanosilica in simulated concrete environments was investigated using dynamic light scattering. A concrete environment was [...] Read more.
The dispersion quality of nanosilica (NS) is an essential parameter to influence and control the material characteristics of nanosilica-enhanced concrete. In this research, the dispersion quality of colloidal nanosilica in simulated concrete environments was investigated using dynamic light scattering. A concrete environment was simulated by creating a synthetic pore solution that mimicked the ionic concentration and pH value of ultrahigh-performance concrete in the fluid state. Four colloidal nanosilica samples were used, ranging in particle sizes from 5 to 75 nm, with differing solid contents and stabilizing ions. It was found that the sodium stabilized 20 nm NS sol remains dispersed at a solid concentration of 2 wt % through a variety of pH values with the inclusion of potassium ions. Calcium ions are a major contributor to the agglomeration of NS sols and only small concentrations of calcium ions can drastically affect the dispersion quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Recent Progress in Nanomaterials for Modern Concrete Infrastructure: Advantages and Challenges
Materials 2019, 12(21), 3548; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12213548 - 29 Oct 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Modern concrete infrastructure requires structural components with higher mechanical strength and greater durability. A solution is the addition of nanomaterials to cement-based materials, which can enhance their mechanical properties. Some such nanomaterials include nano-silica (nano-SiO2), nano-alumina (nano-Al2O3), [...] Read more.
Modern concrete infrastructure requires structural components with higher mechanical strength and greater durability. A solution is the addition of nanomaterials to cement-based materials, which can enhance their mechanical properties. Some such nanomaterials include nano-silica (nano-SiO2), nano-alumina (nano-Al2O3), nano-ferric oxide (nano-Fe2O3), nano-titanium oxide (nano-TiO2), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene and graphene oxide. These nanomaterials can be added to cement with other reinforcement materials such as steel fibers, glass, rice hull powder and fly ash. Optimal dosages of these materials can improve the compressive, tensile and flexural strength of cement-based materials, as well as their water absorption and workability. The use of these nanomaterials can enhance the performance and life cycle of concrete infrastructures. This review presents recent researches about the main effects on performance of cement-based composites caused by the incorporation of nanomaterials. The nanomaterials could decrease the cement porosity, generating a denser interfacial transition zone. In addition, nanomaterials reinforced cement can allow the construction of high-strength concrete structures with greater durability, which will decrease the maintenance requirements or early replacement. Also, the incorporation of nano-TiO2 and CNTs in cementitious matrices can provide concrete structures with self-cleaning and self-sensing abilities. These advantages could help in the photocatalytic decomposition of pollutants and structural health monitoring of the concrete structures. The nanomaterials have a great potential for applications in smart infrastructure based on high-strength concrete structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Performance Concrete)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Title: Field Evaluation of Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC) Railway Sleepers

Authors: Younghoon Bae, Seung Yup Jang, Jae-Yeol Cho and Sukhoon Pyo

2. Title: Microstructural Characteristics of Sound Absorbable High Performance Concrete Incorporating Natural Fibers

Authors: Jin Young Yoon, Taehoon Koh and Sukhoon Pyo

3. Title: Characterization of the Compressive Behavior of Brittle Materials at High Strain Rates using the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars
Authors: Tomasz Jankowiak, Alexis Rusinek and George Z. Voyiadjis

4. Author: S.J. Kwon

Back to TopTop