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Special Issue "State-of-the-Art Materials Science and Engineering in Korea 2022"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 March 2023 | Viewed by 3569

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sukhoon Pyo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919, Korea
Interests: ultra high performance concrete; sound-absorbable high performance concrete; railway; composites; sustainable construction materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Traditionally, material research in Korea has been prominent in the field of metal materials. As the research and development of advanced materials create new industries and contribute significantly to national economic growth, the importance of material research continues to grow in Korea. As a result, despite a relatively short history, Korea's material research achievements are leading global technology. In recent years, remarkable accomplishments have been achieved in the research on innovative functional materials, smart materials, nanomaterials, bio-materials, battery materials, and eco-friendly materials. This Special Issue aims to collect an overview of materials research activities in Korea. Research topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Sustainable material solutions to the environmental burdens
  • Self-healing materials for engineering applications
  • Mechanical, electrical, thermal, or magnetic properties of materials
  • Ultra-lightweight and high-strength composites
  • Nanotechnology for multifunctional materials
  • Innovative materials for 3D printing applications
  • Structural applications of high-performance materials

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit manuscripts on the subject “State-of-the-Art Materials Science and Engineering in Korea” for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, as well as comprehensive reviews are welcome. Please feel free to contact me, the guest editor, in case of further questions.

And the Guest Editor Assistant for this special issue is:

Mr. Siyu Wu
Interests: vibration reduction ability of construction materials; sustainable construction materials
Affiliation: Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919, Korea

Prof. Dr. Sukhoon Pyo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainability
  • functional materials
  • 3D printing
  • high-performance structural materials
  • nanotechnology

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Self-Aligned Liquid Crystals on Anisotropic Nano/Microstructured Lanthanum Yttrium Strontium Oxide Layer
Materials 2022, 15(19), 6843; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15196843 - 02 Oct 2022
Viewed by 427
Abstract
We propose an efficient alignment method for liquid crystals (LCs). A brush-coating method handles film deposition and LC alignment treatment simultaneously herein, meaning a reduction in the conventional alignment layer treatment process steps. A lanthanum yttrium strontium oxide (LaYSrO) film prepared by the [...] Read more.
We propose an efficient alignment method for liquid crystals (LCs). A brush-coating method handles film deposition and LC alignment treatment simultaneously herein, meaning a reduction in the conventional alignment layer treatment process steps. A lanthanum yttrium strontium oxide (LaYSrO) film prepared by the sol–gel process was used for the alignment layer. Topographical details of the brush-coated LaYSrO films (compared with spin-coated films) were investigated by atomic force microscopy. Spin-coated LaYSrO meant that the film formation alone without orientation treatment represented an isotropic surface. On the other hand, the 270 °C-cured brush-coated LaYSrO showed nano/microstructure with directionality. It indicates that brush-hair sweeping induced shearing stress on the sol state of the LaYSrO, which results in surface anisotropy for LC alignment. The uniform LC alignment state was confirmed by polarized optical microscopy and pretilt analysis. The brush-coated LaYSrO shows fine optical transparency compared to plain and indium-tin-oxide coated glasses, and thermal stability up to 150 °C for LC alignment. Competitive electro-optical performances of the brush-coated LaYSrO were verified in a twisted-nematic LC system compared to those of the conventionally used polyimide layer. Consequently, we expect that the brush-coating process can be an innovative technology for LC alignment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Materials Science and Engineering in Korea 2022)
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Article
Supercritical CO2-Induced Evolution of Alkali-Activated Slag Cements
Materials 2022, 15(17), 5873; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15175873 - 25 Aug 2022
Viewed by 406
Abstract
The phase changes in alkali-activated slag samples when exposed to supercritical carbonation were evaluated. Ground granulated blast furnace slag was activated with five different activators. The NaOH, Na2SiO3, CaO, Na2SO4, and MgO were used as [...] Read more.
The phase changes in alkali-activated slag samples when exposed to supercritical carbonation were evaluated. Ground granulated blast furnace slag was activated with five different activators. The NaOH, Na2SiO3, CaO, Na2SO4, and MgO were used as activators. C-S-H is identified as the main reaction product in all samples along with other minor reaction products. The X-ray diffractograms showed the complete decalcification of C-S-H and the formation of CaCO3 polymorphs such as calcite, aragonite, and vaterite. The thermal decomposition of carbonated samples indicates a broader range of CO2 decomposition. Formation of highly cross-linked aluminosilicate gel and a reduction in unreacted slag content upon carbonation is observed through 29Si and 27Al NMR spectroscopy. The observations indicate complete decalcification of C-S-H with formation of highly cross-linked aluminosilicates upon sCO2 carbonation. A 20–30% CO2 consumption per reacted slag under supercritical conditions is observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Materials Science and Engineering in Korea 2022)
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Article
Effect of Types of Microparticles on Vibration Reducibility of Cementitious Composites
Materials 2022, 15(14), 4821; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15144821 - 11 Jul 2022
Viewed by 468
Abstract
The vibration-reducing ability of construction materials is generally described by the damping ratio of the materials. Previously, many studies on the damping ratio of concrete have been done, such as the addition of rubber, polymer, fiber, and recycled aggregates in the concrete. However, [...] Read more.
The vibration-reducing ability of construction materials is generally described by the damping ratio of the materials. Previously, many studies on the damping ratio of concrete have been done, such as the addition of rubber, polymer, fiber, and recycled aggregates in the concrete. However, the application of these materials in construction is limited due to their drawbacks. This paper investigated the effect of the replacement ratio and the size of the hollow glass microspheres (HGM), cenospheres (CS), and graphite flakes (GF) on the damping ratio of mortar. Furthermore, rubber particles (RP), aluminum powder (AP), and natural fiber (NF) were investigated to find if they have a combination effect with HGM. The half-power bandwidth method was conducted to obtain the damping ratio at 28 days of curing, and the compressive and flexural strength tests were also conducted to study the mechanical properties of mortar that contained HGM, CS, and GF. The results show that increases in the size of HGM and the replacement ratio of sand with HGM lead to an increase in the damping ratio. Moreover, RP and NF do not provide a combination effect with HGM on the damping ratio, whereas the application of AP results in a drastic compressive strength decrease even with an increase in damping ratio when incorporated with HGM. Besides, an increase in the replacement percentage of CS also leads to an improvement in the damping ratio, and a smaller size and higher replacement ratio of GFs can improve the damping ratio compared to other additives. As a result, CS and GF are more effective than HGM. 50% replacement ratio of CS slightly reduced the compressive strength by 6.4 MPa while improving the damping ratio by 15%, and 10% replacement ratio of samller GF can enhance the flexural strength by over 4.55% while increasing the damping ratio by 20.83%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Materials Science and Engineering in Korea 2022)
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Article
Seismic Performance of F3D Free-Form Structures Using Small-Scale Shaking Table Tests
Materials 2022, 15(8), 2868; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15082868 - 14 Apr 2022
Viewed by 621
Abstract
In recent years, studies that can maximize irregularity have increased as technological constraints weaken owing to the development of construction technology and the increase in demand for free-form structures. Considering this, free-form structures have been constructed using various materials. Concrete is considered most [...] Read more.
In recent years, studies that can maximize irregularity have increased as technological constraints weaken owing to the development of construction technology and the increase in demand for free-form structures. Considering this, free-form structures have been constructed using various materials. Concrete is considered most suitable for realizing an atypical shape because it is highly economical and can be assembled in a free form. However, not many studies have evaluated the structural performance of free-form concrete structures using free-form formwork 3D printer (F3D) technology, a 3D printing technology. Free-form structures must be designed to secure structural stability under both dead and live loads, as well as natural hazards such as wind, snow, and earthquakes. Therefore, in this study, we tested a free-form structure constructed by F3D printing using small-scale models that satisfy the similitude law with shaking tables. Furthermore, a finite element analysis was conducted to validate the small-scale tests. Lastly, the seismic performance of free-form concrete structures was evaluated based on the test and analysis results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Materials Science and Engineering in Korea 2022)
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Article
Bond Behavior of Concrete-Filled Steel Tube Mega Columns with Different Connectors
Materials 2022, 15(8), 2791; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15082791 - 11 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 797
Abstract
Concrete-filled steel tubes (CFSTs) are widely used in construction. To achieve composite action and take full advantage of the two materials, strain continuity at the steel–concrete interface is essential. When the concrete core and steel tube are not loaded simultaneously in regions such [...] Read more.
Concrete-filled steel tubes (CFSTs) are widely used in construction. To achieve composite action and take full advantage of the two materials, strain continuity at the steel–concrete interface is essential. When the concrete core and steel tube are not loaded simultaneously in regions such as beam or brace connections to the steel tubes of a CFST column, the steel–concrete bond plays a crucial role in load transfer. This study uses a validated finite-element model to investigate the bond-slip behavior between the steel tube and concrete in square CFST mega columns through a push-out analysis of eleven 1.2- × 1.2-m mega columns. The bond-slip behavior of CFST mega columns with and without mechanical connectors, including shear studs, rib plates, and connecting plates, is studied. The finite-element results indicate that the mechanical connectors substantially increased the maximum bond stress. Among the analyzed CFST mega columns, those with closely spaced shear studs and rib plate connectors with circular holes exhibited the highest bond stress, followed by plate connectors and widely spaced shear stud connectors. In the case of shear stud connectors, the stud diameter and spacing influenced the bond behavior more than the stud length. As the stud spacing decreased, the failure mode shifted from studs shearing off to outward buckling of the steel tube. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Materials Science and Engineering in Korea 2022)
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