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Special Issue "Novel Fabricated Bioactive Materials: Surface Modification and Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alina Maria Holban

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania
Website | E-Mail
Interests: infectious diseases; antimicrobial therapy; bioactive materials; biofilm control; nanoengineering; medical devices
Guest Editor
Dr. Monica Cartelle Gestal

Department of Infectious Diseases. College of Veterinary Medicine. University of Georgia, Athens (UGA). USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: antibiotic resistance, nanotechnology, shuttle and drug delivery systems, host-pathogen interaction, host immune response

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bioactive materials are currently the focus of intense biomedical research in the race against severe and incurable diseases. Debilitating diseases, chronic health conditions, cancer, and infections are the most relevant fields of application which have benefited from the progress made in the research on bioactive materials. From fast and accurate diagnostic tools to biomimetic implants and personalized therapeutics, materials science has provided innovative solutions, which ensure an increased life expectancy and a much better quality of life for millions and millions of patients.

This Special Issue will focus on novel advances and applications of bioactive materials in the biomedical field. The main objective is to highlight the recent progress in bioactive materials research translated into new biomedical applications with a great impact on infection control, implants, tissue engineering, plastic surgery, drug delivery, dentistry, coatings and tailored implants, biosensors, cancer research, and other relevant topics. Close attention in this Special Issue is given to materials and nanomaterials used for surface modification, which could open a new perspective in the design of improved medical devices, dental implants, dressings, textiles, food packaging, etc. Surface modification could be the best option to limit microbial attachment and biofilm formation on devices, medical surfaces, and disposables, as well as in industrial facilities, where such multicellular communities cause major damages.

Research and long review papers containing new findings and perspectives on the intriguing field of bioactive materials and surfaces and their recently applications are welcomed for this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Alina Maria Holban
Dr. Monica Cartelle Gestal
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive materials
  • nanomaterials
  • drug delivery
  • modified surfaces
  • infection control
  • biofilm inhibition
  • cancer therapy
  • tissue engineering
  • medical devices

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
In Vivo Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Electrospun Micro/Nanofibrous Patches Loaded with Pinus halepensis Bark Extract on Hairless Mice Skin
Materials 2019, 12(16), 2596; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12162596
Received: 30 June 2019 / Revised: 9 August 2019 / Accepted: 14 August 2019 / Published: 15 August 2019
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Abstract
Skin inflammation is the most common symptom in dermatological diseases. It is usually treated by topically applied products, such as creams, gels and lotions. Skin dressings offer a promising alternative as they are endowed with more controlled administration conditions. In this study, the [...] Read more.
Skin inflammation is the most common symptom in dermatological diseases. It is usually treated by topically applied products, such as creams, gels and lotions. Skin dressings offer a promising alternative as they are endowed with more controlled administration conditions. In this study, the anti-inflammatory activity of electrospun alginate micro/nanofibrous dressings loaded with the aqueous extract of Pinus halepensis bark (PHBE) was evaluated in vivo in mice. The upper back skin of SKH-1 female hairless mice was exposed to a single dose of ultraviolet radiation (3 MEDs) and the inflamed area was treated daily by the direct application of a nanofibrous patch. The condition of the skin was evaluated primarily on the basis of clinical observation, photo-documentation and histopathological assessment, while measurements of the erythema, hydration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and sebum production were also taken into account. The results showed that the topical application of alginate micro/nanofibrous dressings loaded with PHBE on UV-inflamed skin significantly attenuated inflammation damage, reducing the healing period. Increase of the loading dose of PHBE resulted in a proportional reduction of the extent, the density and the depth of skin inflammation. With the steadily increasing interest of the skin dressing industry towards nanofibrous matrices, electrospun nonwovens could serve as ideal candidates for the development of multifunctional anti-inflammatory care systems. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation and Characterization of Natural Bleaching Gels Used in Cosmetic Dentistry
Materials 2019, 12(13), 2106; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12132106
Received: 30 May 2019 / Revised: 26 June 2019 / Accepted: 28 June 2019 / Published: 30 June 2019
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Abstract
The novelty of this study consists of the formulation and characterization of three experimental bleaching gels with hydroxylapatite oxides and fluorine (G28®, G29®, G30®) based on natural fruit extracts compared to the commercial Opalescence 15% (GC, Ultradent, South Jordan, UT, USA). Studies have [...] Read more.
The novelty of this study consists of the formulation and characterization of three experimental bleaching gels with hydroxylapatite oxides and fluorine (G28®, G29®, G30®) based on natural fruit extracts compared to the commercial Opalescence 15% (GC, Ultradent, South Jordan, UT, USA). Studies have been conducted on the effect that the experimental bleaching gels have on the color and morphology of different restorative materials (Nanofill®-Schulzer, P.L. Superior Dental Materials GmbH, Hamburg, Germany, and experimental nanocomposites (P11®, P31®, P61®)), immersed in coffee and artificial saliva (for 10 days and 30 days). The study also includes a cytotoxicity test on the gels and nanocomposites after bleaching, with ISO 109993-5 protocols on human dental follicle stem cells. UV-VIS spectroscopy, computerized measurement, and fluorescence spectrometry were used in order to observe the color changes, while the microstructure of the surface was investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). All of the samples immersed in coffee showed the highest color shift in comparison to the baseline. The color difference ΔE values obtained using the two methods (UV-Vis, computerized based on digital images) both after coloring and bleaching, respectively, were different for all four types of nanocomposites stored in the coffee, while no difference was observed in those stored in artificial saliva. The studied experimental gels and nanocomposites had a low cytotoxic effect on cell cultures after bleaching. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Metal Ion-Chelated Tannic Acid Coating for Hemostatic Dressing
Materials 2019, 12(11), 1803; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12111803
Received: 25 April 2019 / Revised: 27 May 2019 / Accepted: 29 May 2019 / Published: 3 June 2019
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Abstract
Tannic acid (TA), a high-molecular-weight polyphenol, is used as a hemostasis spray and unguent for trauma wound remedy in traditional medical treatment. However, the use of tannic acid on a large-area wound would lead to absorption poisoning. In this work, a TA coating [...] Read more.
Tannic acid (TA), a high-molecular-weight polyphenol, is used as a hemostasis spray and unguent for trauma wound remedy in traditional medical treatment. However, the use of tannic acid on a large-area wound would lead to absorption poisoning. In this work, a TA coating was assembled on a quartz/silicon slide, or medical gauze, via chelation interaction between TA and Fe3+ ions and for further use as a hemostasis dressing. Protein adsorption on the TA coating was further investigated by fluorescence signal, ellipsometry analysis and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The adsorbed bovine serum albumin (BSA), immunoglobulin G (IgG) and fibrinogen (Fgn) on the TA coating was in the manner of monolayer saturation adsorption, and fibrinogen showed the largest adsorption. Furthermore, we found the slight hemolysis of the TA coating caused by the lysed red blood cells and adsorption of protein, especially the clotting-related fibrinogen, resulted in excellent hemostasis performance of the TA coating in the blood clotting of an animal wound. Thus, this economic, environmentally friendly, flexible TA coating has potential in medical applications as a means of preparing novel hemostasis materials. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Use of Biopolymers in Mucosally-Administered Vaccinations for Respiratory Disease
Materials 2019, 12(15), 2445; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12152445
Received: 27 June 2019 / Revised: 23 July 2019 / Accepted: 28 July 2019 / Published: 31 July 2019
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Abstract
Communicable respiratory infections are the cause of a significant number of infectious diseases. The introduction of vaccinations has greatly improved this situation. Moreover, adjuvants have allowed for vaccines to be more effective with fewer adverse side effects. However, there is still space for [...] Read more.
Communicable respiratory infections are the cause of a significant number of infectious diseases. The introduction of vaccinations has greatly improved this situation. Moreover, adjuvants have allowed for vaccines to be more effective with fewer adverse side effects. However, there is still space for improvement because while the more common injected formulations induce a systematic immunity, they do not confer the mucosal immunity needed for more thorough prevention of the spread of respiratory disease. Intranasal formulations provide systemic and mucosal immune protection, but they have the potential for more serious side effects and a less robust immune response. This review looks at seven different adjuvants—chitosan, starch, alginate, gellan, β-glucan, emulsan and hyaluronic acid—and their prospective ability to improve intranasal vaccines as adjuvants and antigen delivery systems. Full article
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