Multidisciplinary Approach to Diagnosing and Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders—Patient Care Challenges

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2024 | Viewed by 6119

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of General Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Łódź, 90419 Łódź, Poland
Interests: bruxism; masticatory muscles; personality; coping mechanisms; diagnostics; treatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Every day there is new research concerning temporomandibular disorders. A thorough examination and diagnosis are crucial in both researching and discussing issues pertaining to TMD and orofacial pain. Moreover, both the treatment and management of those issues are uniquely complex. It involves not only dentistry but also physiotherapy along with elements of psychology and psychotherapy.

A complex and multidisciplinary approach to both diagnosing and treating all issues under the scope of temporomandibular disorders is still a current discussion. Even though polysomnography with audio and video recordings remains the “golden standard” in diagnosing sleep bruxism and muscle activity, electromyographic (EMG) examination of muscle activity, sometimes combined with an electrocardiogram (ECG), proved to be promising as well. Moreover, a detailed temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscles examination by palpation can also be a viable option, along with a specific questionnaire. Treatment and management of these conditions involve splint therapy combined with physiotherapy, especially manual therapy. Furthermore, it is recommended to use relaxation techniques and biofeedback along with therapy or counseling for a more holistic approach.

This Special Issue will focus on a multidisciplinary approach to temporomandibular disorders. Papers pertaining to diagnosing and possible treatment options of temporomandibular disorders, masticatory muscle tension and fatigue with regard to patient care challenges are encouraged.

Both reviews and research on the subject are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Monika Lukomska-Szymanska
Dr. Klara Saczuk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • multidisciplinary approach
  • mental health
  • bruxism
  • masticatory muscles
  • temporomandibular joint
  • orofacial pain
  • temporomandibular disorders

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

14 pages, 715 KiB  
Article
Cannabidiol Intervention for Muscular Tension, Pain, and Sleep Bruxism Intensity—A Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial
by Karolina Walczyńska-Dragon, Anna Kurek-Górecka, Wojciech Niemczyk, Zuzanna Nowak, Stefan Baron, Paweł Olczyk, Aleksandra Nitecka-Buchta and Wojciech M. Kempa
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(5), 1417; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13051417 - 29 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2000
Abstract
Background: Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are the most prevalent non-dental pain issues in the maxillofacial region. Despite advancements, diagnosing and managing TMDs continues to pose challenges. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of cannabidiol (CBD) formulations, with different concentrations, in patients experiencing [...] Read more.
Background: Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are the most prevalent non-dental pain issues in the maxillofacial region. Despite advancements, diagnosing and managing TMDs continues to pose challenges. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of cannabidiol (CBD) formulations, with different concentrations, in patients experiencing sleep bruxism and muscle-related TMDs, with a particular emphasis on their myorelaxant, pain-relieving, and bruxism-reducing properties. Methods: The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMDs) was utilized as the diagnostic framework. Sixty patients completed the study, which followed a parallel-group, three-arm, randomized, double-blind clinical trial design, with a 1:1:1 allocation ratio across three groups: 1a, 1b, and 2. Groups 1a and 1b received CBD formulations at concentrations of 10% and 5%, respectively, while Group 2 received a placebo formulation. The trial consisted of four main visits, namely screening, baseline, first follow-up after 14 days, and second follow-up after 30 days, during which surface electromyography (sEMG), the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain assessment, and Bruxoff examinations were conducted. Results: The reduction in pain, as measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS), among patients using the 10% CBD formulation was 57.4% (p < 0.05), accompanied by a decrease in sEMG activity by 42.1% (p < 0.05). Conversely, individuals using the 5% CBD formulation experienced a 40.8% (p < 0.05) decrease in pain. Regarding the decrease in the sleep bruxism index, users of the 10% CBD formulation saw the highest reduction of 51% (p < 0.05). These findings underscore the efficacy of the proposed treatment in both experimental groups, with a notable advantage observed in Group 1a. Conversely, the outcomes of the selected variables for the control group did not exhibit significant differences throughout the study. Conclusions: The intraoral use of CBD formulations in patients with TMDs have proven to be a successful treatment for reducing pain, muscle tension, and bruxing activity in individuals with sleep bruxism and muscle-related TMDs. Specifically, a concentration of 10% CBD has demonstrated superior results compared to 5% CBD. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

14 pages, 652 KiB  
Review
Use of Surface Electromyography to Evaluate Effects of Therapeutic Methods on Masticatory Muscle Activity in Patients with Temporomandibular Disorders: A Narrative Review
by Tomasz Dorosz, Aleksandra Mańko and Michał Ginszt
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(3), 920; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13030920 - 5 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1059
Abstract
The presented narrative review aims to present the impact of therapeutic methods on the masticatory muscle activity measured using surface electromyography (sEMG) in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Original interventional studies with baseline data for diagnosed TMD groups with full-text articles in English [...] Read more.
The presented narrative review aims to present the impact of therapeutic methods on the masticatory muscle activity measured using surface electromyography (sEMG) in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Original interventional studies with baseline data for diagnosed TMD groups with full-text articles in English published in scientific journals in the last ten years were included in the evaluation process. The following narrative review considered only clinical, controlled, and randomized studies. Articles that included the following parameters were qualified for this review: adult participants, diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder, the presence of a musculoskeletal dysfunction, no other severe comorbidities, use of therapeutic interventions, and sEMG measurement before and after the intervention. Ten papers were accepted and analyzed for the final evaluation in the presented review. Several studies using surface electromyographic examination prove the effectiveness of various therapies to normalize the bioelectrical activity of the masticatory muscles, either reduction during rest or increase during a functional task in patients diagnosed with temporomandibular disorders. This narrative review shows the influence of manual and physical treatments on electromyographic masticatory muscle activity, including soft tissue mobilization, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, low-level laser therapy, and moist heat therapy. Changes in masticatory muscle activity coincided with changes in TMD-associated pain and range of mandibular mobility. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

13 pages, 2314 KiB  
Systematic Review
A Meta-Analysis of the Global Prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders
by Grzegorz Zieliński, Beata Pająk-Zielińska and Michał Ginszt
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(5), 1365; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13051365 - 28 Feb 2024
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2408
Abstract
Background: This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the proportion of people with TMDs in different studies, considering factors such as geographical region, patient age, and sample size. Methods: The search yielded 6984 articles on the incidence of TMDs. Finally, 74 studies with [...] Read more.
Background: This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the proportion of people with TMDs in different studies, considering factors such as geographical region, patient age, and sample size. Methods: The search yielded 6984 articles on the incidence of TMDs. Finally, 74 studies with 172,239 subjects and 35,259 with TMDs were selected for final analysis. Analyses were performed using the R statistical language. Results: The incidence of TMDs in the world population was 34%. The age group 18–60 years is the most exposed to TMDs. From the data presented, we observed that for each continent, the female group was 9% to 56% larger than the male group. The highest female-to-male ratio (F:M) was reported in South America (1.56), whereas the lowest F:M ratio was reported in Europe (1.09), suggesting an almost equal distribution of males and females. Conclusions: This suggests that geographical location may play a role in the results of the studies. The prevalence of TMDs was significantly higher in South America (47%) compared to Asia (33%) and Europe (29%). Larger epidemiological studies of TMDs in African and Australian populations are recommended. In conclusion, both visual and statistical assessments suggest that the results of our meta-analysis are robust and unlikely to be significantly affected by publication bias. This suggests that geographical location may play a role in the prevalence of TMDs. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop