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Special Issue "Nutritional Management and Outcomes in Malnourished Medical Inpatients"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Endocrinology & Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. med. Zeno Stanga

Head of Nutritional Medicine and Metabolism, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, Nutritional Medicine and Metabolism, Bern University Hospital, CH-3010 Bern
Website | E-Mail
Interests: malnutrition; nutritional management; nutrtitional therapy; refeeding syndrome
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. med. Philipp Schuetz

Medical University Department, Clinic for Endocrinology/Metabolism/Clinical Nutrition, Kantonsspital Aarau, Aarau and Medical Faculty of the University of Basel, Switzerland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: malnutrition; nutritional management; nutrtitional therapy; refeeding syndrome

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Malnutrition lurks in the background of hospitalized medical patients. A large proportion of patients are malnourished upon hospital admission and patients often experience further nutritional deterioration during their stay and during disease recovery. However, although the negative effects of malnutrition on the outcomes of patients have been well recognized, we still struggle to identify appropriate patients and efficacious nutritional interventions to overcome this problem. Still, recent studies have produced convincing evidence that adequate and timely nutritional management of medical in-patients can contribute to the prevention of negative consequences and thus improve the clinical outcome of patients.

This Special Issue of the Journal of Clinical Medicine will focus on multiple practical aspects of nutritional management in medical in-patients, from screening for nutritional risk to the practical implementation of nutritional therapy, its possible complications, including financial aspects, to increase clinician awareness and knowledge of nutritional care in hospitals.

Prof. Dr. med. Zeno Stanga
Prof. Dr. med. Philipp Schuetz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutritional management
  • Malnutrition
  • Refeeding syndrome
  • Oral nutrition
  • Enteral nutrition
  • Parenteral nutrition
  • Costs
  • Nutritional screening
  • Nutritional assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Protein Intake, Nutritional Status and Outcomes in ICU Survivors: A Single Center Cohort Study
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(1), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8010043
Received: 16 December 2018 / Revised: 27 December 2018 / Accepted: 31 December 2018 / Published: 4 January 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (533 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: We hypothesized that protein delivery during hospitalization in patients who survived critical care would be associated with outcomes following hospital discharge. Methods: We studied 801 patients, age ≥ 18 years, who received critical care between 2004 and 2012 and survived hospitalization. All [...] Read more.
Background: We hypothesized that protein delivery during hospitalization in patients who survived critical care would be associated with outcomes following hospital discharge. Methods: We studied 801 patients, age ≥ 18 years, who received critical care between 2004 and 2012 and survived hospitalization. All patients underwent a registered dietitian formal assessment within 48 h of ICU admission. The exposure of interest, grams of protein per kilogram body weight delivered per day, was determined from all oral, enteral and parenteral sources for up to 28 days. Adjusted odds ratios for all cause 90-day post-discharge mortality were estimated by mixed- effects logistic regression models. Results: The 90-day post-discharge mortality was 13.9%. The mean nutrition delivery days recorded was 15. In a mixed-effect logistic regression model adjusted for age, gender, race, Deyo-Charlson comorbidity index, acute organ failures, sepsis and percent energy needs met, the 90-day post-discharge mortality rate was 17% (95% CI: 6–26) lower for each 1 g/kg increase in daily protein delivery (OR = 0.83 (95% CI 0.74–0.94; p = 0.002)). Conclusions: Adult medical ICU patients with improvements in daily protein intake during hospitalization who survive hospitalization have decreased odds of mortality in the 3 months following hospital discharge. Full article
Figures

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Open AccessArticle
Decreased Bioelectrical Impedance Phase Angle in Hospitalized Children and Adolescents with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes: A Case-Control Study
J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7(12), 516; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm7120516
Received: 25 October 2018 / Revised: 25 November 2018 / Accepted: 3 December 2018 / Published: 4 December 2018
PDF Full-text (690 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the body composition and nutritional status of hospitalized pediatric patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes by using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) with phase angle (PA) calculation. PA is considered to be a useful and [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to assess the body composition and nutritional status of hospitalized pediatric patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes by using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) with phase angle (PA) calculation. PA is considered to be a useful and very sensitive indicator of the nutritional and functional status, and it has not yet been evaluated in such a population. Sixty-three pediatric patients aged 4 to 18 years, with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, were included in the study. The control group consisted of 63 healthy children and adolescents strictly matched by gender and age in a 1:1 case: control manner. In both groups, BIA with PA calculation was performed. Diabetic patients, in comparison to control subjects, had a highly significantly lower PA of 4.85 ± 0.86 vs. 5.62 ± 0.81, p < 0.001. They also demonstrated a lower percentage of body cell mass (BCM%), 46.89 ± 5.67% vs. 51.40 ± 4.19%, p < 0.001; a lower body cell mass index (BCMI), 6.57 ± 1.80% vs. 7.37 ± 1.72%, p = 0.004; and a lower percentage of muscle mass (MM%), 44.61 ± 6.58% vs. 49.40 ± 7.59%, p < 0.001, compared to non-diabetic controls. The significantly lower PA value in diabetic patients indicate their worse nutritional and functional status compared to healthy subjects. To assess the predictive and prognostic value of this finding in this population, further prospective studies involving larger sample of patients are required. Full article
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Figure 1

J. Clin. Med. EISSN 2077-0383 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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