Special Issue "Sport and Exercise Medicine"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Factors and Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 12 July 2023.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Filipe Manuel Clemente
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Escola Superior Desporto e Lazer, Instituto Politécnico de Viana do Castelo, Rua Escola Industrial e Comercial de Nun’Álvares, 4900-347 Viana do Castelo, Portugal
Interests: athletic performance; training load monitoring; sports training; sports technology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Practicing sports and exercise is one of the most effective non-pharmacological approaches for improving physical and mental health. Additionally, there is consistent evidence about the beneficial effect of sports and exercise on the clinical population which may meaningfully benefit from regular practice, contributing toward regulating the progression of specific diseases or even reducing drug need. Due to the importance of sports and exercise, it is essential to improve the clinical practice that may include this non-pharmacological strategy as part of a multidisciplinary approach. Interactions with drugs, nutrition, or other strategies also need to be further researched for a great overview of the impact of all of them, acting together to benefit health.

Therefore, this Special Issue’s focus is to open a window of opportunity to publish articles that reveal the effects of using sports and exercises as a single or combined approach for healthcare in clinical and non-clinical populations. Considering that more research should be conducted and published about such important topics, the aim of the Special Issue “Sport and Exercise Medicine” is to publish original, high-quality investigations and narrative and systematic reviews in the field of health care, sports, and exercise. We look forward to receiving contributions related (but not limited) to the following topics: (i) experimental studies and interventions using sports and exercise in healthy or clinical populations; (ii) observational analytic studies identifying the effects of practicing sport and exercise on health and quality of life; (iii) systematic reviews and meta-analyses that may summarize the evidence about the effects of sport and exercise on healthy and clinical populations.

Dr. Filipe Manuel Clemente
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sports medicine
  • Clinical Exercise
  • Recreational sport
  • Preventive health
  • Health care

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Mechanism of the Effect of High-Intensity Training on Urinary Metabolism in Female Water Polo Players Based on UHPLC-MS Non-Targeted Metabolomics Technique
Healthcare 2021, 9(4), 381; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9040381 - 01 Apr 2021
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Abstract
Objective: To study the changes in urine metabolism in female water polo players before and after high-intensity training by using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and to explore the biometabolic characteristics of urine after training and competition. Methods: Twelve young female water polo [...] Read more.
Objective: To study the changes in urine metabolism in female water polo players before and after high-intensity training by using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and to explore the biometabolic characteristics of urine after training and competition. Methods: Twelve young female water polo players (except goalkeepers) from Shanxi Province were selected. A 4-week formal training was started after 1 week of acclimatization according to experimental requirements. Urine samples (5 mL) were collected before formal training, early morning after 4 weeks of training, and immediately after 4 weeks of training matches, and labeled as T1, T2, and T3, respectively. The samples were tested by LC-MS after pre-treatment. XCMS, SIMCA-P 14.1, and SPSS16.0 were used to process the data and identify differential metabolites. Results: On comparing the immediate post-competition period with the pre-training period (T3 vs. T1), 24 differential metabolites involved in 16 metabolic pathways were identified, among which niacin and niacinamide metabolism and purine metabolism were potential post-competition urinary metabolic pathways in the untrained state of the athletes. On comparing the immediate post-competition period with the post-training period (T3 vs. T2), 10 metabolites involved in three metabolic pathways were identified, among which niacin and niacinamide metabolism was a potential target urinary metabolic pathway for the athletes after training. Niacinamide, 1-methylnicotinamide, 2-pyridone, L-Gln, AMP, and Hx were involved in two metabolic pathways before and after the training. Conclusion: Differential changes in urine after water polo games are due to changes in the metabolic pathways of niacin and niacinamide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport and Exercise Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Variations of Trail Runner’s Fitness Measures across a Season and Relationships with Workload
Healthcare 2021, 9(3), 318; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030318 - 12 Mar 2021
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Abstract
Trail running involves off-road running over different surfaces of positive and negative unevenness. Given these particularities and the associated physical demands, it is essential to understand this relationship and how fitness levels influence performance. This study aimed to analyze fitness level variations during [...] Read more.
Trail running involves off-road running over different surfaces of positive and negative unevenness. Given these particularities and the associated physical demands, it is essential to understand this relationship and how fitness levels influence performance. This study aimed to analyze fitness level variations during different times of the season and establish a relationship between changes in fitness levels and accumulated load. Twenty-five trail running athletes (age: 36.23 ± 8.30 years) were monitored over 52 weeks. Three periods of assessment were implemented, while load between those periods was calculated. Athletes were monitored daily by global positioning systems. The collected data included distance covered, duration, and rate of perceived exertion (RPE), which were used to obtain session-RPE. Additionally, maximal aerobic speed, vertical jump, and dynamic balance were tested periodically. Moderate inverse correlations were found between assessment 1 and 2 for total sRPE and vertical jump: countermovement jump (VJ: CMJ) (r = −0.349), and Y balance test: left posterolateral (YBT: LPL) (r = −0.494). Similar correlations were found between assessment 2 and 3 for total sRPE and VJ: CMJ (r = −0.397), and vertical jump: drop jump (VJ: DJ) (r = −0.395). The results suggest that trail running coaches should monitor and assess dose–response relationships and possible anterior asymmetries of dynamic balance performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport and Exercise Medicine)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Part I: Relationship among Training Load Management, Salivary Immunoglobulin A, and Upper Respiratory Tract Infection in Team Sport: A Systematic Review
Healthcare 2021, 9(4), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9040366 - 24 Mar 2021
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Abstract
Immunoglobulin A (IgA), which is the first line of defense against upper respiratory tract viruses, has been related with training load management. This article aimed to systematically identify and summarize (1) the studies that have found a relationship between training load and salivary [...] Read more.
Immunoglobulin A (IgA), which is the first line of defense against upper respiratory tract viruses, has been related with training load management. This article aimed to systematically identify and summarize (1) the studies that have found a relationship between training load and salivary IgA in team sports, and (2) the studies that have highlighted a relationship between IgA and upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in team sports. A systematic review of relevant articles was carried out using two electronic databases (PubMed and WoK) until 3 October 2020. From a total of 174 studies initially found, 24 were included in the qualitative synthesis. This systematic review confirmed that lower values of IgA occurred after greater training load (intensity/volume) and congested periods. In this scenario, a low level of IgA was correlated with higher URTI, which makes training load management mandatory to healthcare avoiding immunosuppression. Therefore, physical fitness and conditioning coaches should carefully manage training load progression, avoiding high-intensity sessions in two consecutive days. In addition, they should not program high-intensity training sessions during at least the two days following competition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport and Exercise Medicine)
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Other

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Open AccessSystematic Review
Strength Training versus Stretching for Improving Range of Motion: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Healthcare 2021, 9(4), 427; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9040427 - 07 Apr 2021
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Abstract
(1) Background: Stretching is known to improve range of motion (ROM), and evidence has suggested that strength training (ST) is effective too. However, it is unclear whether its efficacy is comparable to stretching. The goal was to systematically review and meta-analyze randomized controlled [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Stretching is known to improve range of motion (ROM), and evidence has suggested that strength training (ST) is effective too. However, it is unclear whether its efficacy is comparable to stretching. The goal was to systematically review and meta-analyze randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of ST and stretching on ROM (INPLASY 10.37766/inplasy2020.9.0098). (2) Methods: Cochrane Library, EBSCO, PubMed, Scielo, Scopus, and Web of Science were consulted in October 2020 and updated in March 2021, followed by search within reference lists and expert suggestions (no constraints on language or year). Eligibility criteria: (P) Humans of any condition; (I) ST interventions; (C) stretching (O) ROM; (S) supervised RCTs. (3) Results: Eleven articles (n = 452 participants) were included. Pooled data showed no differences between ST and stretching on ROM (ES = −0.22; 95% CI = −0.55 to 0.12; p = 0.206). Sub-group analyses based on risk of bias, active vs. passive ROM, and movement-per-joint analyses showed no between-protocol differences in ROM gains. (4) Conclusions: ST and stretching were not different in their effects on ROM, but the studies were highly heterogeneous in terms of design, protocols and populations, and so further research is warranted. However, the qualitative effects of all the studies were quite homogeneous. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport and Exercise Medicine)
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Open AccessSystematic Review
Effects of the Small-Sided Soccer Games on Blood Pressure in Untrained Hypertensive Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
Healthcare 2021, 9(3), 345; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030345 - 18 Mar 2021
Viewed by 279
Abstract
This systematic review with meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effects of small-sided games (SSGs)-based programs on the systolic and diastolic blood pressure of untrained hypertensive adults. The data sources utilized were Web of Science, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and PubMed. The eligibility criteria were: [...] Read more.
This systematic review with meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effects of small-sided games (SSGs)-based programs on the systolic and diastolic blood pressure of untrained hypertensive adults. The data sources utilized were Web of Science, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and PubMed. The eligibility criteria were: (i) randomized controlled trials including a control group and an intervention group exclusively using soccer SSGs; (ii) intervention and control groups including an untrained hypertensive adult population; (iii) articles written in English; and (iv) only full-text and original articles. The database search initially identified 241 titles. From those, five articles were eligible for the systematic review and meta-analysis. The included randomized controlled studies involved five individual experimental groups and 88 participants, and 68 participants in the five control groups. The results showed a large and beneficial effect of SSG on systolic (ES = 1.69; 95% CI = 0.71 to 2.66; p = 0.001; I2 = 85.2%; Egger’s test p = 0.101) and diastolic blood pressure (ES = 2.25; 95% CI = 1.44 to 3.06; p < 0.001; I2 = 74.8%; Egger’s test p = 0.118) when compared to the control groups. The findings of the current systematic review and meta-analysis revealed consistent beneficial effects of recreational soccer SSGs on untrained men and women from the hypertensive population, although high levels of heterogeneity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport and Exercise Medicine)
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