Fitness Status and Quality of Life during and Post- COVID-19 Pandemic in Different Populations

A special issue of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education (ISSN 2254-9625).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 February 2022) | Viewed by 10363

Special Issue Editors


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Co-Guest Editor
1. Department of Physical Education and Sports, University of Granada, 18010 Granada, Spain
2. HEME Research Group, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
3. Department of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-7344, Iran
4. Sports Scientist, Sepahan Football Club, Isfahan 81887-78473, Iran
Interests: sports performance; growth of youth and maturation; external load monitoring; training load; well-being; soccer training; injury prevention; strength and conditioning; sports nutrition and supplement; quality of life; reliability; validity of devices
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
1. Research Group on Physical and Health Literacy and Health-Related Quality of Life (PHYQOL), Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Extremadura, 10003 Caceres, Spain
2. Departamento de Desporto e Saúde, Escola de Saúde e Desenvolvimento Humano, Universidade de Évora, 16 7004-516 Évora, Portugal
Interests: fitness; sport; adolescent; children; physical condition; obesity; health; well-being; physical literacy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Regular practice of physical activity plays a fundamental role in preventing and treating different diseases. The pandemic caused by COVID-19 and the consequent lockdown established, has caused a considerable decrease of people mobility and motor activity. This issue has led to an increase in unhealthy lifestyle habits in population. Adopting unhealthy lifestyles could have negative consequences, both in dealing with the virus today and in the quality of life of sedentary people once the pandemic has passed. Some of the consequences that this sedentary situation can cause over time are cardiovascular diseases, such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. This special issue aims to compiled different studies that analyze the effect of lockdown during and post- COVID-19 pandemic on health status, physical fitness, and health-related quality of life in many different population (children, adolescents, adults, elderly, vulnerable populations.

Prof. Dr. Jorge Pérez-Gómez
Dr. Hadi Nobari
Dr. Jorge Carlos-Vivas
Dr. Maria Mendoza-Muñoz
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • coronavirus
  • pandemic
  • physical exercise
  • physically inactivity
  • health status
  • physical fitness
  • HRQoL

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 751 KiB  
Article
Psychological Factors Explaining Perceived Impact of COVID-19 on Travel
by José Magano, Diogo Guedes Vidal, Hélder Fernando Pedrosa e Sousa, Maria Alzira Pimenta Dinis and Ângela Leite
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(4), 1120-1133; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11040083 - 24 Sep 2021
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2763
Abstract
This cross-sectional study aims to determine the psychological factors that contribute to the perceived impact of COVID-19 on travel using a convenience sample (N = 1122) from the general population to whom instruments assessing the perception of the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on [...] Read more.
This cross-sectional study aims to determine the psychological factors that contribute to the perceived impact of COVID-19 on travel using a convenience sample (N = 1122) from the general population to whom instruments assessing the perception of the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on travel, anxiety, fear, phobia, risk perception, and stress were applied. The participants were mainly female (65.6%), had not attended university, and who were professionally active, with a mean age of around 30-years-old (M = 31.91, SD = 13.76, Min = 18, Max = 81). The perceived impact of COVID-19 on travel correlates with all of the psychological variables, mainly in terms of the emotional fear of COVID-19. Together with the perceived risk of COVID-19, social phobia due to COVID-19, and COVID-19 stress contamination, these variables explain 20% of the perceived impact of COVID-19 on travel variance. The relationship between COVID-19 stress socio-economic consequences and the perception of the pandemic’s impact on travel is moderated by the emotional perceived risk of COVID-19. Fear and perception of this risk explain the impact of the COVID-19 on travel in pandemic times, suggesting that the psychological impact of fear and anxiety induced by the pandemic needs to be handled as a public health priority. Full article
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17 pages, 2790 KiB  
Article
Portuguese Version of COVID-19 Perceived Risk Scale and COVID-19 Phobia Scale: Psychometric Properties
by Ângela Leite, Diogo Guedes Vidal, Hélder Fernando Pedrosa e Sousa, Maria Alzira Pimenta Dinis and José Magano
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(3), 1044-1060; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11030078 - 11 Sep 2021
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3249
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic scenario has a psychological impact on individuals and society. A higher level of perceived risk concerning COVID-19 has been found when compared to other potential health threats. A misperception of risk in contrast with the real risk may lead people [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic scenario has a psychological impact on individuals and society. A higher level of perceived risk concerning COVID-19 has been found when compared to other potential health threats. A misperception of risk in contrast with the real risk may lead people to develop disruptive cognitive, affective, or behavioral responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, namely, coronaphobia. Validated instruments are needed to evaluate such responses. This work aims to validate the COVID-19 Perceived Risk Scale (C19PRS) and the COVID-19 Phobia Scale (C19PS) in the Portuguese population. The two scales were translated from English to Portuguese using the back-translation technique. The cultural adaptation was framed in the context of establishing the validity and reliability of the instruments. In two studies, C19PRS and C19PS were validated for the adult Portuguese population (N = 1122; women = 725 (64.6%); mean age of 31.91 years old) through exploratory factorial analysis, followed by a confirmatory factorial analysis. Convergent validity was calculated by composite reliability (CR) and average variance extracted (AVE) values. Discriminant validity was assessed by square roots of the AVE values and their comparison with the C19PRS and C19PS dimensions’ cross-correlations. Both C19PRS and C19PS present a good adjustment model and solid reliability and validity and have significant correlations with fear of COVID-19 and COVID-19 anxiety scales. Full article
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11 pages, 310 KiB  
Article
An Examination of COVID-19-Related Stressors among Parents
by Sarah Alonzi, Jae eun Park, Angélica Pagán, Courtney Saulsman and Madison W. Silverstein
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(3), 838-848; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11030061 - 6 Aug 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2905
Abstract
The circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic have taken a psychological toll on parents. Thus, understanding the impact of these contextual stressors on parents is important to help inform the development of family-based health promotion interventions. The present study examined parents’ perception of various [...] Read more.
The circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic have taken a psychological toll on parents. Thus, understanding the impact of these contextual stressors on parents is important to help inform the development of family-based health promotion interventions. The present study examined parents’ perception of various sources of stress resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants (N = 294) completed an open-ended question about their primary source of stress during the pandemic, which we coded into one or more of the following categories: family, work, health, and finance. We used chi-square tests to determine whether gender, marital status, financial strain, and education level were significantly related to each of the four primary sources of stress. We found that female, married, and financially strained participants were more likely to report family-related stressors. Further, we found that participants who expressed concern over health-related stressors were more likely to have pre-existing health conditions. Finally, we found that single participants were more likely to express concerns over financial stressors. Our findings shed light on parental concerns following the pandemic and inform new research directions, clinical approaches, and policy issues at the individual, community, and societal levels. Full article
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