Rheological Aspects regarding the Development of Novel Food and Beverages

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Physics and (Bio)Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 October 2022) | Viewed by 9523

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Facultad de Física, University of Seville, 41012 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: biopolymers; emulsion science; food colloids; food processing; food rheology; food waste and by-products valorization; interfacial rheology; sustainability
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Guest Editor
Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: biopolymers; food waste recovery; rheology; innovative processing technologies; functional foods; sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many current consumers are demanding healthier and novel foods as the preferred options in their personal nutrition. This Special Issue is focused on new methods used in the development of novel food and beverages from different types of food sources. Advanced technologies such as ultrasound, chromatography, and spectroscopy have been employed in the analysis and quality assessment of these new products. In particular, this Special Issue emphasizes the evaluation of novel foods from a rheological perspective. In this sense, we welcome studies discussing novel and traditional characterization techniques from the perspectives of rheology, food safety, sustainability, process engineering, (bio)chemical changes, and sensory issues, among others. We kindly encourage you to submit a manuscript(s) for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome. Submissions can cover the following topics (but are not limited to them): (i) development of potential functional foods; (ii) rheological analysis of novel food products; (iii) comparison between the rheological and texture properties of foods and beverages; and (iv) use of wastes and by-products for the development of novel foods and beverages.

Prof. Dr. Alberto Romero
Dr. Víctor Manuel Pérez Puyana
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • beverages
  • emulsions
  • food processing
  • food rheology
  • food wastes and by-products
  • functional properties
  • gels
  • novel foods
  • rheology
  • texture

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 2123 KiB  
Article
Soy Protein Isolate as Emulsifier of Nanoemulsified Beverages: Rheological and Physical Evaluation
by Daniel Castro-Criado, Mercedes Jiménez-Rosado, Víctor Perez-Puyana and Alberto Romero
Foods 2023, 12(3), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12030507 - 22 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2299
Abstract
The production of biologically active molecules or the addition of new bioactive ingredients in foods, thereby producing functional foods, has been improved with nanoemulsion technology. In this sense, the aim of this work was to develop nanoemulsified beverages as potential candidates for the [...] Read more.
The production of biologically active molecules or the addition of new bioactive ingredients in foods, thereby producing functional foods, has been improved with nanoemulsion technology. In this sense, the aim of this work was to develop nanoemulsified beverages as potential candidates for the encapsulation of bioactive compounds, whose integrity and release across the intestinal tract are controlled by the structure and stability of the interfaces. To achieve this, firstly, a by-product rich-in protein has been evaluated as a potential candidate to act as an emulsifier (chemical content, amino acid composition, solubility, ζ-potential and surface tension were evaluated). Later, emulsions with different soy protein isolate concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 wt%), pH values (2, 4, 6 and 8) and homogenization pressures (100, 120 and 140 PSI) were prepared using a high-pressure homogenizer after a pre-emulsion formation. Physical (stability via Backscattering and drop size evolution) and rheological (including interfacial analysis) characterizations of emulsions were carried out to characterize their potential as delivery emulsion systems. According to the results obtained, the nanoemulsions showed the best stability when the protein concentration was 2.0 wt%, pH 2.0 and 120 PSI was applied as homogenization pressure. Full article
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13 pages, 523 KiB  
Article
Application of Lactose-Free Whey Protein to Greek Yogurts: Potential Health Benefits and Impact on Rheological Aspects and Sensory Attributes
by Agatha Transfeld da Silva, Jair José de Lima, Priscila Reis, Maurício Passos, Catiucia Giraldi Baumgartner, Aiane Benevide Sereno, Cláudia Carneiro Hecke Krüger and Lys Mary Bileski Cândido
Foods 2022, 11(23), 3861; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11233861 - 29 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2228
Abstract
The application of β-galactosidase in the fermentation of milk enables the acquirement of lower levels of lactose that are tolerated by lactose maldigesters and can reduce the nutritional consequences of avoiding dairy products. The present study evaluated the viability of the fortification of [...] Read more.
The application of β-galactosidase in the fermentation of milk enables the acquirement of lower levels of lactose that are tolerated by lactose maldigesters and can reduce the nutritional consequences of avoiding dairy products. The present study evaluated the viability of the fortification of lactose-free prebiotic Greek yogurt formulas with whey protein concentrate (WPC). Two rotational central composite designs (RCCDs) were applied: one to perform the hydrolysis of the whey protein concentrate and another for the yogurt formulations (α = 2 with 2 central points and 4 axial points). Two β-galactosidase enzymes obtained from Kluyveromyces lactis were used. The content of lactose, glucose, galactose, and lactic acid were determined in the WPC, milk (pasteurized and powdered), and yogurts. The three best formulations regarding the attributes’ viscosity, syneresis, firmness, and elasticity were sensorially evaluated by using a nine-point hedonic scale. A microbiological analysis was performed after 48 h of yogurt production. The characterization of the products and the comparison of the results obtained were evaluated using the Student’s T test and the analysis of variance with Tukey’s test (p-values < 0.05). The application of a lactose-free WPC promoted viscosity, firmness, and elasticity. The syneresis was reduced, and whey increased the protein and calcium content. Lactose-free WPC can be used as a partial substitute for skimmed powdered milk in yogurts. The obtained results are encouraging with respect to the production of lactose-free Greek yogurts by the dairy industry. Full article
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15 pages, 2065 KiB  
Article
Optimizing the Rheological and Textural Properties of Chapatti Enriched with House Crickets (Acheta domesticus) Flour Using Hydrocolloids by an I-Optimal Design
by Habiba Khatun, Siebe Lievens, Ruben Smets, Mohammad Akhtaruzzaman, Mik Van Der Borght and Johan Claes
Foods 2022, 11(21), 3467; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11213467 - 1 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1616
Abstract
The fortification of food with edible insect flour can improve its nutrition profile, but also affect its techno-functional characteristics. In this study, an I-optimal design was applied to improve the rheological and textural properties of wheat flour chapatti containing 10% cricket (Acheta [...] Read more.
The fortification of food with edible insect flour can improve its nutrition profile, but also affect its techno-functional characteristics. In this study, an I-optimal design was applied to improve the rheological and textural properties of wheat flour chapatti containing 10% cricket (Acheta domesticus) flour. More specifically, the impact and optimal addition of hydrocolloids (carboxymethyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, guar gum and xanthan gum) and water content were studied. For all the responses, the model and model terms were highly significant and showed the different impact of the hydrocolloids on the rheological properties. To evaluate the predictive power of the models, two sets of optimal process settings were chosen: one based on dough properties, and another on baked chapatti. For both sets, the actual responses were in the range of predicted responses for almost all properties. In addition, it was shown that using the settings based on dough properties, the actual responses were not significantly different from the control chapatti, whereas for the settings based on baked chapatti, there were differences in terms of the extensibility of both dough and chapatti. Thus, the I-optimal design is suitable to optimize the dough properties and the baked chapatti when enriching chapatti with cricket flour. Full article
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22 pages, 2304 KiB  
Article
Effect of Dietary Fiber and Thermal Conditions on Rice Bran Wax-Based Structured Edible Oils
by Laura Principato, Daniele Carullo, Andrea Bassani, Alice Gruppi, Guillermo Duserm Garrido, Roberta Dordoni and Giorgia Spigno
Foods 2021, 10(12), 3072; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10123072 - 10 Dec 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2509
Abstract
In this work, extra-virgin olive oil (EVO)- and sunflower oil (SFO)-based oleogels were structured using rice bran wax (RBW) at 10% by weight (w/w). Bamboo fiber milled with 40 (BF40), 90 (BF90) and 150 (BF [...] Read more.
In this work, extra-virgin olive oil (EVO)- and sunflower oil (SFO)-based oleogels were structured using rice bran wax (RBW) at 10% by weight (w/w). Bamboo fiber milled with 40 (BF40), 90 (BF90) and 150 (BF150) µm of average size was added as a structuring agent. The effect of fiber addition and cooling temperature (0, 4, and 25 °C) on thermal and structural parameters of achieved gels was assessed by rheological (both in rotational and oscillatory mode), texture, and differential scanning calorimetry tests. Oleogelation modified the rheological behavior of EVO and SFO, thus shifting from a Newtonian trend typical of oils to a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian behavior in gels. Moreover, oleogels behaved as solid-like systems with G′ > G″, regardless of the applied condition. All samples exhibit a thermal-reversible behavior, even though the presence of hysteresis suggests a partial reduction in structural properties under stress. Decreasing in cooling temperature negatively contributed to network formation, despite being partially recovered by low-granulometry fiber addition. The latter dramatically improved either textural, rheological, or stability parameters of gels, as compared with only edible oil-based systems. Finally, wax/gel compatibility affected the crystallization enthalpy and final product stability (gel strength) due to different gelator–gelator and gelator–solvent interactions. Full article
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