Future Challenges in Meat and Meat Products Technology

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 12604

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Animal Food Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Biotechnology, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, ul. Skromna 8, 20-704 Lublin, Poland
Interests: oxidative stability; phenols; antioxidant activity; food safety; nitrite reduction; probiotic meat products; functional meat products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Centro Tecnológico de la Carne de Galicia, Parque Tecnológico de Galicia, rúa Galicia No. 4, 32900 San Cibrao das Viñas, Ourense, Spain
Interests: food analysis; meat and meat products; healthy meat; bioactive compounds; active packaging; chromatography; mass spectrometry; fatty acids; polyphenols; natural antioxidant extracts; food science; food technology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Meat and meat products are an essential part of the human diet. In addition to the essential nutrients that meat is rich in, such as proteins, fats, and minerals, consumers are looking for products with added value and outstanding sensory features. Furthermore, changes in consumer trends, technical and technological progress, and changes in legal regulations are key factors driving the development of innovations in the meat industry. Intensive research relates to the use of innovative methods of meat product production to protect their sensory and nutritional properties and to guarantee a safe product. This Special Issue aims to bring together the latest advances in the development of meat and meat product technology incorporating all the aforementioned aspects. In this Special Issue, we invited researchers to contribute with original or review articles related to modern technologies that can reduce food additives and improve their stability (e.g., emerging technologies, active packaging), the reformulation of meat products to make them healthier (replacement saturated fats, salts, additives, etc.) as well as enrich them with pro-health ingredients to manufacture functional products.

Dr. Karolina Wójciak
Dr. Rubén Domínguez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • meat and meat product quality
  • modern technologies
  • emerging techniques
  • healthy meat
  • food additives
  • bioactive compounds
  • nutritional quality
  • active packaging
  • functional meat products
  • prebiotics and probiotics

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 269 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Ginger Rhizome Addition and Storage Time on the Quality of Pork Meatloaf
by Mirosława Karpińska-Tymoszczyk, Anna Draszanowska and Marzena Danowska-Oziewicz
Foods 2022, 11(22), 3563; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11223563 - 09 Nov 2022
Viewed by 1778
Abstract
This study investigated the effect of ginger-rhizome addition and storage time on the physicochemical and sensory quality of pork meatloaf. Three types of pork meatloaf were evaluated: control and with 1% and 2% addition of ginger. All meatloaves were vacuum packaged and stored [...] Read more.
This study investigated the effect of ginger-rhizome addition and storage time on the physicochemical and sensory quality of pork meatloaf. Three types of pork meatloaf were evaluated: control and with 1% and 2% addition of ginger. All meatloaves were vacuum packaged and stored for 0, 7, 14, and 21 days at 4 °C. The addition of ginger rhizome significantly reduced lipid oxidation, and the higher inclusion rate was more effective in this regard. Ginger decreased red-colour saturation (a*) and increased colour brightness. The addition of ginger rhizome at 2% induced a greater decrease in meat hardness and improved chewiness in comparison with 1% addition. Products containing ginger differed from the control sample in aroma, texture, and taste, but no significant differences were found in the overall quality of the compared samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Challenges in Meat and Meat Products Technology)
10 pages, 719 KiB  
Article
Effect of Grafted Insect Protein with Palatinose on Quality Properties of Phosphate-Free Meat Emulsion
by Tae-Kyung Kim, Yea-Ji Kim, Jake Kim, Hyun-Jung Yun, Min-Cheol Kang and Yun-Sang Choi
Foods 2022, 11(21), 3354; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11213354 - 25 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1259
Abstract
Due to concerns about the negative effects of phosphate on human health, the development of phosphate substitutes is an active area of research. Among the various methods, the structural modification of proteins has previously been established. In this study, we used grafting technology. [...] Read more.
Due to concerns about the negative effects of phosphate on human health, the development of phosphate substitutes is an active area of research. Among the various methods, the structural modification of proteins has previously been established. In this study, we used grafting technology. Extracted insect protein was grafted with palatinose (GI), and 0.1 and 0.15% of GI were added to a phosphate-free meat emulsion mixed with 0.1% of eggshell powder (ES). The pH, myofibrillar protein solubility, and apparent viscosity increased with the addition of GI and ES (p < 0.05). Color values were also affected by GI and ES addition (decreased CIE L* and CIE a* and increased CIE b*; p < 0.05), while cooking loss was only improved by the addition of ES and not GI. Although the total fluid separated more than negative control (p < 0.05), the addition of ES improved emulsion stability and total expressible fluid separation and the fat separation reduced with addition of GI and ES (p < 0.05). Lipid oxidation was inhibited by the addition of GI and ES (p < 0.05). Moreover, the protein molecular weight distribution under 20 kDa was modified by the addition of GI, and the hardness and springiness of treatments decreased. In conclusion, the addition of GI and ES might be used to improve cooking loss, emulsion stability, and antioxidants, while the textural properties should be further researched. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Challenges in Meat and Meat Products Technology)
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8 pages, 1454 KiB  
Article
Species-Specific Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) Identification of Bovine in Cultured Meat Serum for halal Status
by Mohd Izhar Ariff Mohd Kashim, Alia Aryssa Abdul Haris, Nur Asmadayana Hasim, Sahilah Abd Mutalib and Nurina Anuar
Foods 2022, 11(20), 3235; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11203235 - 17 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1818
Abstract
Meat culturing technology goes beyond laboratory research and materialises in the market. Nonetheless, this technology has raised concerns among Muslim consumers worldwide due to its medium, especially foetal bovine serum (FBS), which originates from blood. Thus, the aim of this research was to [...] Read more.
Meat culturing technology goes beyond laboratory research and materialises in the market. Nonetheless, this technology has raised concerns among Muslim consumers worldwide due to its medium, especially foetal bovine serum (FBS), which originates from blood. Thus, the aim of this research was to determine the halal status of cultured meat by detecting species-specific DNA of bovine serum as one of the media used during meat production. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was conducted by targeting mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II (COII) gene sequences, producing a 165 bp amplicon. The sequences of the primers used were Bovine-F, 5′-CAT CAT AGC AAT TGC CAT AGT CC-3′ and Bovine-R, 5′-GTA CTA GTA GTA TTA GAG CTA GAA TTA G-3′. DNA extraction was conducted using a QIAGEN Blood and Tissue™ commercial kit. The presence study also included a literature review on the Istihalah (transformation) concept in order to determine the halal status of cultured meat. The results revealed that bovine DNA was detected in all samples tested using PCR analysis. Therefore, Istihalah tammah (perfect transformation) does not occur due to the ability of PCR analysis to detect bovine DNA in FBS and is prohibited according to Shariah law. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Challenges in Meat and Meat Products Technology)
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16 pages, 948 KiB  
Article
Carcass Characteristics and Beef Quality of Young Grass-Fed Angus x Salers Bovines
by Jingjing Liu, Marie-Pierre Ellies-Oury, Liselotte Pannier, Dominique Gruffat, Denis Durand, Faustine Noel, Bernard Sepchat, Isabelle Legrand, Sophie Prache and Jean-François Hocquette
Foods 2022, 11(16), 2493; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11162493 - 18 Aug 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1773
Abstract
To characterize carcass and meat attributes, such as beef eating quality in specific farming conditions, 31 young grass-fed crossbred Angus x Salers cattle in two farming systems (a mono-cattle system versus a mixed system with beef cattle and sheep) were used in this [...] Read more.
To characterize carcass and meat attributes, such as beef eating quality in specific farming conditions, 31 young grass-fed crossbred Angus x Salers cattle in two farming systems (a mono-cattle system versus a mixed system with beef cattle and sheep) were used in this study. Three muscle cuts (striploin—m. longissimus dorsi et thoracis; bolar blade—m. triceps brachii caput longum; internal flank plate—m. obliquus internus abdominis) were used for consumer eating quality testing and striploin was used for panelist eating quality assessment, and objective measurements [Warner–Bratzler shear force (WBSF) and fatty acid (FA) and antioxidant contents]. Results indicated that the farming system had no impact on carcass characteristics or meat quality, but it tended to affect FA content, which is likely explained by between-system differences in animal maturity (assessed by ossification score). Animal gender had significant effects on three eating quality traits evaluated by untrained consumers, with higher flavor liking, overall liking, and overall meat eating quality (MQ4) scores in females than in males. Additionally, FA contents were correlated with sensory quality traits to varying extents: consumer-scored tenderness, flavor, and overall liking were mainly positively correlated with ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) contents, and panelist-evaluated tenderness and abnormal flavor were more positively correlated with total lipids, saturated fatty acid (SFA), and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) contents. Overall, this study showed that specific grass-fed crossbred Angus x Salers cattle can produce lean meat rich in ω-3 PUFAs with a low ω-6/ω-3 ratio and with “better than average” beef eating quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Challenges in Meat and Meat Products Technology)
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7 pages, 528 KiB  
Communication
A Note on the Effects of Yoghurt Acid Whey Marination on the Tenderness and Oxidative Stability of Different Meat Types
by Panagiotis Simitzis, Fotini Zikou, Dionisis Progoulakis, Georgios Theodorou and Ioannis Politis
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2557; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112557 - 23 Oct 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1419
Abstract
The aim of this preliminary study was to examine the effects of yoghurt acid whey (YAW) marination on quality parameters and the oxidative stability of pork, lamb, rabbit and chicken meat. Twenty-four samples per meat type were randomly allocated to one of four [...] Read more.
The aim of this preliminary study was to examine the effects of yoghurt acid whey (YAW) marination on quality parameters and the oxidative stability of pork, lamb, rabbit and chicken meat. Twenty-four samples per meat type were randomly allocated to one of four groups: CON, without any treatment; YAW1 and YAW2, where samples were marinated for 20 h at 4 °C at a pH of 5 or 4.5, respectively; and YAW3, where samples were treated as in the YAW2 group except hesperidin was also added at the level of 2 g/L. As indicated, meat tenderness was improved as a result of YAW marination, apart from the chicken samples. In general, values of pH, redness and yellowness were decreased after immersion in YAW both in raw and cooked samples. However, lightness was increased in the raw meat samples as a result of YAW marination, though this effect was not observed in the cooked meat samples with the exception of chicken meat. Chroma values were higher in controls compared to YAW-treated groups in raw pork and lamb meat, while no significant differences regarding chroma were found among groups in cooked lamb and rabbit meat. Hue angle values were greater in YAW-treated groups compared to controls in raw samples, whereas no significant differences among groups were indicated in cooked meat. Meat oxidation rates were not affected by treatment with YAW and the hesperidin addition, which improved the oxidative stability of lamb and chicken meat. Thus, YAW marination could be recommended as a novel strategy that improves meat tenderness without negative effects on the other quality characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Challenges in Meat and Meat Products Technology)

Review

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22 pages, 1015 KiB  
Review
Emerging Trends for Nonthermal Decontamination of Raw and Processed Meat: Ozonation, High-Hydrostatic Pressure and Cold Plasma
by Ume Roobab, James S. Chacha, Afeera Abida, Sidra Rashid, Ghulam Muhammad Madni, Jose Manuel Lorenzo, Xin-An Zeng and Rana Muhammad Aadil
Foods 2022, 11(15), 2173; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11152173 - 22 Jul 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2953
Abstract
Meat may contain natural, spoilage, and pathogenic microorganisms based on the origin and characteristics of its dietary matrix. Several decontamination substances are used during or after meat processing, which include chlorine, organic acids, inorganic phosphates, benzoates, propionates, bacteriocins, or oxidizers. Unfortunately, traditional decontamination [...] Read more.
Meat may contain natural, spoilage, and pathogenic microorganisms based on the origin and characteristics of its dietary matrix. Several decontamination substances are used during or after meat processing, which include chlorine, organic acids, inorganic phosphates, benzoates, propionates, bacteriocins, or oxidizers. Unfortunately, traditional decontamination methods are often problematic because of their adverse impact on the quality of the raw carcass or processed meat. The extended shelf-life of foods is a response to the pandemic trend, whereby consumers are more likely to choose durable products that can be stored for a longer period between visits to food stores. This includes changing purchasing habits from “just in time” products “for now” to “just in case” products, a trend that will not fade away with the end of the pandemic. To address these concerns, novel carcass-decontamination technologies, such as ozone, high-pressure processing and cold atmospheric plasma, together with active and clean label ingredients, have been investigated for their potential applications in the meat industry. Processing parameters, such as exposure time and processing intensity have been evaluated for each type of matrix to achieve the maximum reduction of spoilage microorganism counts without affecting the physicochemical, organoleptic, and functional characteristics of the meat products. Furthermore, combined impact (hurdle concept) was evaluated to enhance the understanding of decontamination efficiency without undesirable changes in the meat products. Most of these technologies are beneficial as they are cost-effective, chemical-free, eco-friendly, easy to use, and can treat foods in sealed packages, preventing the product from post-process contamination. Interestingly, their synergistic combination with other hurdle approaches can help to substitute the use of chemical food preservatives, which is an aspect that is currently quite desirable in the majority of consumers. Nonetheless, some of these techniques are difficult to store, requiring a large capital investment for their installation, while a lack of certification for industrial utilization is also problematic. In addition, most of them suffer from a lack of sufficient data regarding their mode of action for inactivating microorganisms and extending shelf-life stability, necessitating a need for further research in this area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Challenges in Meat and Meat Products Technology)
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