Special Issue "New Insights into Food Fermentation"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (16 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Valentina Bernini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food and Drug, University of Parma, Italy
Interests: food microbiology; food quality; food safety; food fermentation; lactic acid bacteria; foodborne pathogenic microorganisms; antimicrobials; dairy products; vegetable fermented products
Prof. Dr. Juliano De Dea Lindner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil
Interests: food technology; food microbiology; food safety; food fermentation; bioprocesses; lactic acid bacteria; microbial starters

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food fermentation has been used since ancient times for food preservation. At present, fermented foods are still and even more appreciated by consumers thanks to the high quality and safety standards achieved, and the improvements in terms of nutritional and organoleptic characteristics. Many foods are still produced following traditional practices but novel approaches to food fermentation have also attracted the interest of researchers and industries. Innovative technological and biological processes, as well as novel approaches of investigation, deeply interact to steer traditional products into modern diet and to open up perspectives for the fermentation of unconventional substrates and food byproducts.

The Special Issue aims to collect original research articles and reviews on advanced approaches concerning food fermentation. In particular, papers are welcome focusing on unconventional matrix fermentation, processes for substrate valorization, functional compounds obtained through fermentation, fermentations increasing quality and safety standards, but also papers presenting innovative approaches shedding light on the microbial community that characterizes fermented foods.

Prof. Dr. Valentina Bernini
Prof. Dr. Juliano De Dea Lindner
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lactic acid bacteria
  • yeasts
  • food quality
  • food safety
  • unconventional food matrices
  • byproduct valorization
  • technological processes
  • strains selection
  • microbiological characterization
  • microbial community in fermented foods

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
New Insights into Food Fermentation
Foods 2022, 11(3), 283; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11030283 - 21 Jan 2022
Viewed by 173
Abstract
Food fermentation has been used for thousands of years for food preservation [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)

Research

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Article
Metagenomic Study on Chinese Homemade Paocai: The Effects of Raw Materials and Fermentation Periods on the Microbial Ecology and Volatile Components
Foods 2022, 11(1), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11010062 - 28 Dec 2021
Viewed by 133
Abstract
“Chinese paocai” is typically made by fermenting red radish or cabbage with aged brine (6–8 w/w). This study aimed to reveal the effects of paocai raw materials on fermentation microorganisms by metagenomics sequencing technology, and on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [...] Read more.
“Chinese paocai” is typically made by fermenting red radish or cabbage with aged brine (6–8 w/w). This study aimed to reveal the effects of paocai raw materials on fermentation microorganisms by metagenomics sequencing technology, and on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy, using red radish or cabbage fermented for six rounds with aged brine. The results showed that in the same fermentation period, the microbial diversity in cabbage was higher than that in red radish. Secundilactobacillus paracollinoides and Furfurilactobacillus siliginis were the characteristic bacteria in red radish paocai, whereas 15 species of characteristic microbes were found in cabbage. Thirteen kinds of VOCs were different between the two raw materials and the correlation between the microorganisms and VOCs showed that cabbage paocai had stronger correlations than radish paocai for the most significant relationship between 4-isopropylbenzyl alcohol, α-cadinol, terpinolene and isobutyl phenylacetate. The results of this study provide a theoretical basis for understanding the microbiota and their relation to the characteristic flavors of the fermented paocai. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
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Article
Mediterranean Spontaneously Fermented Sausages: Spotlight on Microbiological and Quality Features to Exploit Their Bacterial Biodiversity
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2691; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112691 - 03 Nov 2021
Viewed by 520
Abstract
The wide array of spontaneously fermented sausages of the Mediterranean area can represent a reservoir of microbial biodiversity and can be an important source of new technological and functional strains able to preserve product properties, counteracting the impoverishment of their organoleptic typical features [...] Read more.
The wide array of spontaneously fermented sausages of the Mediterranean area can represent a reservoir of microbial biodiversity and can be an important source of new technological and functional strains able to preserve product properties, counteracting the impoverishment of their organoleptic typical features due to the introduction of commercial starter cultures. We analysed 15 artisanal salamis from Italy, Spain, Croatia and Slovenia to evaluate the microbiota composition, through culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques (i.e., metagenomic analysis), chemical–physical features, biogenic amines and aroma profile. The final pH varied according to origin and procedures (e.g., higher pH in Italian samples due to long ripening and mold growth). Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and coagulase-negative cocci (CNC) were the dominant population, with highest LAB counts in Croatian and Italian samples. Metagenomic analysis showed high variability in qualitative and quantitative microbial composition: among LAB, Latilactobacillus sakei was the dominant species, but Companilactobacillus spp. was present in high amounts (45–55% of the total ASVs) in some Spanish sausages. Among staphylococci, S. epidermidis, S. equorum, S. saprophyticus, S. succinus and S. xylosus were detected. As far as biogenic amines, tyramine was always present, while histamine was found only in two Spanish samples. These results can valorize the bacterial genetic heritage present in Mediterranean products, to find new candidates of autochthonous starter cultures or bioprotective agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
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Article
Contribution of Microorganisms to Biogenic Amine Accumulation during Fish Sauce Fermentation and Screening of Novel Starters
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2572; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112572 - 25 Oct 2021
Viewed by 370
Abstract
In this study, high-throughput sequencing and culture-dependent and HPLC methods were used to investigate the contribution and regulation of biogenic amines (BAs) by dominant microorganisms during fish sauce fermentation. The results showed that the microbial composition constantly changed with the fermentation of fish [...] Read more.
In this study, high-throughput sequencing and culture-dependent and HPLC methods were used to investigate the contribution and regulation of biogenic amines (BAs) by dominant microorganisms during fish sauce fermentation. The results showed that the microbial composition constantly changed with the fermentation of fish sauce. Tetragenococcus (40.65%), Lentibacillus (9.23%), Vagococcus (2.20%), Psychrobacter (1.80%), Pseudomonas (0.98%), Halomonas (0.94%) and Staphylococcus (0.16%) were the dominant microflora in fish sauce. The content of BAs gradually increased as the fermentation progressed. After 12 months of fermentation, the histamine content (55.59 mg/kg) exceeded the toxic dose recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Correlation analysis showed that dominant microorganisms have a great contribution to the accumulation of BAs. By analyzing the BA production capacity of dominant isolates, the accumulation of BAs in fish sauce might be promoted by Tetragenococcus and Halomonas. Moreover, four strains with high BA reduction ability were screened out of 44 low BA-producing dominant strains, and their influence on BA accumulation in fermented foods was determined. Results demonstrated that Staphylococcus nepalensis 5-5 and Staphylococcus xylosus JCM 2418 might be the potential starters for BA control. The present study provided a new idea for the control of BAs in fermented foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
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Article
Effect of Fermentation Parameters on Natto and Its Thrombolytic Property
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2547; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112547 - 22 Oct 2021
Viewed by 420
Abstract
Natto is a popular food because it contains a variety of active compounds, including nattokinase. Previously, we discovered that fermenting natto with the combination of Bacillus subtilis GUTU09 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BZ25 resulted in a dramatically better sensory and functional quality [...] Read more.
Natto is a popular food because it contains a variety of active compounds, including nattokinase. Previously, we discovered that fermenting natto with the combination of Bacillus subtilis GUTU09 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BZ25 resulted in a dramatically better sensory and functional quality of natto. The current study further explored the effects of different fermentation parameters on the quality of natto fermented with Bacillus subtilis GUTU09 and Bifidobacterium BZ25, using Plackett–Burman design and response surface methodology. Fermentation temperature, time, and inoculation amount significantly affected the sensory and functional qualities of natto fermented with mixed bacteria. The optimal conditions were obtained as follows: soybean 50 g/250 mL, triangle container, 1% sucrose, Bacillus subtilis GUTU09 to Bifidobacterium BZ25 ratio of 1:1, inoculation 7%, fermentation temperature 35.5 °C, and fermentation time 24 h. Under these conditions, nattokinase activity, free amino nitrogen content, and sensory score were increased compared to those before optimization. They were 144.83 ± 2.66 FU/g, 7.02 ± 0.69 mg/Kg and 82.43 ± 5.40, respectively. The plate thrombolytic area and nattokinase activity both increased significantly as fermentation time was increased, indicating that the natto exhibited strong thrombolytic action. Hence, mixed-bacteria fermentation improves the taste, flavor, nattokinase activity, and thrombolysis of natto. This research set the groundwork for the ultimate manufacturing of natto with high nattokinase activity and free amino nitrogen content, as well as good sensory and thrombolytic properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
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Article
Lipase Addition Promoted the Growth of Proteus and the Formation of Volatile Compounds in Suanzhayu, a Traditional Fermented Fish Product
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2529; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112529 - 21 Oct 2021
Viewed by 366
Abstract
This work investigated the effect of lipase addition on a Chinese traditional fermented fish product, Suanzhayu. The accumulation of lactic acid and the decrease of pH during the fermentation were mainly caused by the metabolism of Lactobacillus. The addition of lipase [...] Read more.
This work investigated the effect of lipase addition on a Chinese traditional fermented fish product, Suanzhayu. The accumulation of lactic acid and the decrease of pH during the fermentation were mainly caused by the metabolism of Lactobacillus. The addition of lipase had little effect on pH and the bacterial community structure but promoted the growth of Proteus. The addition of lipase promotes the formation of volatile compounds, especially aldehydes and esters. The formation of volatile compounds is mainly divided into three stages, and lipase had accelerated the fermentation process. Lactobacillus, Enterococcus and Proteus played an important role not only in inhibition of the growth of Escherichia-Shigella, but also in the formation of flavor. This study provides a rapid fermentation method for the Suanzhayu process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
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Article
Impact of Thyme Microcapsules on Histamine Production by Proteus bacillus in Xinjiang Smoked Horsemeat Sausage
Foods 2021, 10(10), 2491; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10102491 - 18 Oct 2021
Viewed by 370
Abstract
Here, we explored the influences of thyme microcapsules on the growth, gene expression, and histamine accumulation by Proteus bacillus isolated from smoked horsemeat sausage. RT-qPCR was employed to evaluate the gene expression level of histidine decarboxylase (HDC) cascade-associated genes. We used HPLC to [...] Read more.
Here, we explored the influences of thyme microcapsules on the growth, gene expression, and histamine accumulation by Proteus bacillus isolated from smoked horsemeat sausage. RT-qPCR was employed to evaluate the gene expression level of histidine decarboxylase (HDC) cascade-associated genes. We used HPLC to monitor histamine concentration both in pure culture as well as in the processing of smoked horsemeat sausage. Results showed that histamine accumulation was suppressed by thyme microcapsule inhibitory effect on the histamine-producing bacteria and the reduction in the transcription of hdcA and hdcP genes. Besides, compared with thyme essential oil (EO), thyme microcapsules exhibited higher antibacterial activity and had a higher score for overall acceptance. Therefore, the addition of thyme microcapsules in Xinjiang smoked horsemeat sausage inhibits histamine accumulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
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Article
Detection of Enteric Viruses and Core Microbiome Analysis in Artisanal Colonial Salami-Type Dry-Fermented Sausages from Santa Catarina, Brazil
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1957; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081957 - 22 Aug 2021
Viewed by 720
Abstract
Microbial fermentation plays an important role in the manufacturing of artisanal sausages and can have major effects on product quality and safety. We used metagenomics and culture-dependent methods to study the presence of Hepatitis E virus (HEV) and Rotavirus-A (RV-A), and fungal and [...] Read more.
Microbial fermentation plays an important role in the manufacturing of artisanal sausages and can have major effects on product quality and safety. We used metagenomics and culture-dependent methods to study the presence of Hepatitis E virus (HEV) and Rotavirus-A (RV-A), and fungal and bacterial communities, in artisanal Colonial salami-type dry-fermented sausages in Santa Catarina state, Brazil. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeast dominated the microbiome. Latilactobacillus sakei and Debaryomyces hansenii were ubiquitous and the most abundant species. The DNA of some foodborne pathogens was found in very low concentrations although viable cells of most of these species were undetectable by cultivation methods. The characteristics of the raw material and hygiene of the artisanal sausage manufacturing process resulted in high loads of beneficial microorganisms and the absence of HEV and RV-A viruses as determined by RT-qPCR assays. In conclusion, high LAB load in sausages was more relevant to preventing pathogen growth than the ripening time and/or physicochemical characteristics. However, the presence of Clostridium spp. and other pathogens in some samples must be taken into account for the development of future preservation methods; appropriate LAB starter cultures and health surveillance are required in the production process to prevent foodborne outbreaks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
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Article
Bacterial Community of Grana Padano PDO Cheese and Generical Hard Cheeses: DNA Metabarcoding and DNA Metafingerprinting Analysis to Assess Similarities and Differences
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1826; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081826 - 07 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 523
Abstract
The microbiota of Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheeses plays an essential role in defining their quality and typicity and could be applied to protect these products from counterfeiting. To study the possible role of cheese microbiota in distinguishing Grana Padano (GP) cheese [...] Read more.
The microbiota of Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheeses plays an essential role in defining their quality and typicity and could be applied to protect these products from counterfeiting. To study the possible role of cheese microbiota in distinguishing Grana Padano (GP) cheese from generical hard cheeses (HC), the microbial structure of 119 GP cheese samples was studied by DNA metabarcoding and DNA metafingerprinting and compared with 49 samples of generical hard cheeses taken from retail. DNA metabarcoding highlighted the presence, as dominant taxa, of Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus helveticus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Limosilactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus spp., and Lactococcus spp. in both GP cheese and HC. Differential multivariate statistical analysis of metataxonomic and metafingerprinting data highlighted significant differences in the Shannon index, bacterial composition, and species abundance within both dominant and subdominant taxa between the two cheese groups. A supervised Neural Network (NN) classification tool, trained by metagenotypic data, was implemented, allowing to correctly classify GP cheese and HC samples. Further implementation and validation to increase the robustness and improve the predictive capacity of the NN classifier will be needed. Nonetheless, the proposed tool opens interesting perspectives in helping protection and valorization of GP and other PDO cheeses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
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Article
Potential Functional Snacks: Date Fruit Bars Supplemented by Different Species of Lactobacillus spp.
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1760; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081760 - 29 Jul 2021
Viewed by 606
Abstract
The influence of the addition of four different potential probiotic strains, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum (L. plantarum), Lactobacillus delbruekii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus), Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) and Lactinocaseibacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus), in date fruit-based [...] Read more.
The influence of the addition of four different potential probiotic strains, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum (L. plantarum), Lactobacillus delbruekii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus), Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) and Lactinocaseibacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus), in date fruit-based products was investigated in order to evaluate the possibility of producing a functional snack. All bacterial strains tested were able to grow in date fruit palp, reaching probiotic concentrations ranging from 3.1 × 109 to 4.9 × 109 colony-forming units after 48 h of fermentation, and the pH was reduced to 3.5–3.7 or below. The viability of inoculated probiotic bacteria after 4 weeks of storage at 4 °C was slightly reduced. Some biochemical features of the fermented snacks, such as the total phenolic content (TPC), antioxidant activity and detailed polyphenolic profile, were also evaluated. After fermentation, changes in the polyphenol profile in terms of increased free phenolic compounds and related activity were observed. These results may be attributed to the enzymatic activity of Lactobacillus spp. in catalyzing both the release of bioactive components from the food matrix and the remodeling of polyphenolic composition in favor of more bioaccessible molecules. These positive effects were more evident when the snack were fermented with L. rhamnosus. Our results suggest the use of lactic acid fermentation as an approach to enhance the nutritional value of functional foods, resulting in the enhancement of their health-promoting potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
Article
Rice Bran Fermentation Using Lactiplantibacillus plantarum EM as a Starter and the Potential of the Fermented Rice Bran as a Functional Food
Foods 2021, 10(5), 978; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10050978 - 29 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 820
Abstract
Rice bran was fermented using a functional starter culture of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum EM, which exhibited high cholesterol removal and strong antimicrobial activity. Highest viable cell counts (9.78 log CFU/mL) and strong antimicrobial activity were obtained by fermenting 20% rice bran supplemented with 1% [...] Read more.
Rice bran was fermented using a functional starter culture of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum EM, which exhibited high cholesterol removal and strong antimicrobial activity. Highest viable cell counts (9.78 log CFU/mL) and strong antimicrobial activity were obtained by fermenting 20% rice bran supplemented with 1% glucose and 3% corn steep liquor (pH 6.0) at 30 °C for 48 h. The fermented rice bran slurry was hot air-dried (55 °C, 16 h) and ground (HFRB). HFRB obtained showed effective cholesterol removal (45–68%) and antimicrobial activities (100–400 AU/mL) against foodborne pathogenic bacteria and food spoilage fungi. Phytate levels were significantly reduced during fermentation by 53% due to the phytase activity of L. plantarum EM, indicating HFRB does not present nutrient deficiency issues. In addition, fermentation significantly improved overall organoleptic quality. Our results indicate that HFRB is a promising functional food candidate. Furthermore, HFRB appears to satisfy consumer demands for a health-promoting food and environmental and legal requirements concerning the re-utilization of biological byproducts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
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Article
Solid-State Fermentation of Arthrospira platensis to Implement New Food Products: Evaluation of Stabilization Treatments and Bacterial Growth on the Volatile Fraction
Foods 2021, 10(1), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010067 - 30 Dec 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1317
Abstract
Arthrospira platensis is a cyanobacterium widely used in food formulation and mainly consumed as a food supplement because of its high amount of proteins, vitamins and minerals. Different probiotic food supplements are present in the market, and a lactic acid fermented food product [...] Read more.
Arthrospira platensis is a cyanobacterium widely used in food formulation and mainly consumed as a food supplement because of its high amount of proteins, vitamins and minerals. Different probiotic food supplements are present in the market, and a lactic acid fermented food product like dried spirulina could be useful not only to introduce lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with beneficial effects to the diet of consumers, but also to improve or change the aromatic profile of the substrate. Therefore, the aim of this study was the evaluation of lactic acid fermentation of A. platensis biomass, focusing on the consequent changes in the aromatic profile. For this purpose, two different stabilization treatments (UV light treatment and sterilization) were applied prior to fermentation with two LAB strains, Lacticaseibacillus casei 2240 and Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG. The biomass proved to be a suitable matrix for solid-state fermentation, showing a LAB growth of more than 2 log CFU/g in 48 h. The fermentation process was also useful for off-flavor reduction. In particular, the fermentation process significantly influenced the concentration of those compounds responsible for aldehydic/ethereal, buttery/waxy (acetoin and diacetyl), alkane and fermented aromatic notes (isoamyl alcohol). The heat treatment of the matrix, in addition to guaranteed safety for consumers, led to an improved aroma after fermentation. In conclusion, a fermented spirulina powder with a different aromatic profile was obtained with the applied heat treatment. Fermentation with lactic acid bacteria can be an interesting tool to obtain cyanobacterial biomasses with more pleasant sensory properties for potential use in food formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
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Review

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Review
Traditional Fermented Beverages of Mexico: A Biocultural Unseen Foodscape
Foods 2021, 10(10), 2390; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10102390 - 09 Oct 2021
Viewed by 1339
Abstract
Mexico is one of the main regions of the world where the domestication of numerous edible plant species originated. Its cuisine is considered an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity and ferments are important components but have been poorly studied. Traditional fermented foods are [...] Read more.
Mexico is one of the main regions of the world where the domestication of numerous edible plant species originated. Its cuisine is considered an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity and ferments are important components but have been poorly studied. Traditional fermented foods are still diverse, but some are endangered, requiring actions to promote their preservation. Our study aimed to (1) systematize information on the diversity and cultural history of traditional Mexican fermented beverages (TMFB), (2) document their spatial distribution, and (3) identify the main research trends and topics needed for their conservation and recovery. We reviewed information and constructed a database with biocultural information about TMFB prepared and consumed in Mexico, and we analyzed the information through network approaches and mapped it. We identified 16 TMFB and 143 plant species involved in their production, species of Cactaceae, Asparagaceae, and Poaceae being the most common substrates. Microbiological research has been directed to the potential biotechnological applications of Lactobacillus, Bacillus, and Saccharomyces. We identified a major gap of research on uncommon beverages and poor attention on the cultural and technological aspects. TMFB are dynamic and heterogenous foodscapes that are valuable biocultural reservoirs. Policies should include their promotion for conservation. The main needs of research and policies are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
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Review
Cereal- and Fruit-Based Ethiopian Traditional Fermented Alcoholic Beverages
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1781; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121781 - 01 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1317
Abstract
Traditional fermented alcoholic beverages are drinks produced locally using indigenous knowledge, and consumed near the vicinity of production. In Ethiopia, preparation and consumption of cereal- and fruit-based traditional fermented alcoholic beverages is very common. Tella, Borde, Shamita, Korefe, Cheka [...] Read more.
Traditional fermented alcoholic beverages are drinks produced locally using indigenous knowledge, and consumed near the vicinity of production. In Ethiopia, preparation and consumption of cereal- and fruit-based traditional fermented alcoholic beverages is very common. Tella, Borde, Shamita, Korefe, Cheka, Tej, Ogol, Booka, and Keribo are among the popular alcoholic beverages in the country. These beverages have equal market share with commercially produced alcoholic beverages. Fermentation of Ethiopian alcoholic beverages is spontaneous, natural and uncontrolled. Consequently, achieving consistent quality in the final product is the major challenge. Yeasts and lactic acid bacteria are the predominate microorganisms encountered during the fermentation of these traditional alcoholic beverages. In this paper, we undertake a review in order to elucidate the physicochemical properties, indigenous processing methods, nutritional values, functional properties, fermenting microorganisms and fermentation microbial dynamics of Ethiopian traditional alcoholic beverages. Further research will be needed in order to move these traditional beverages into large-scale production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Food Fermentation)
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