Special Issue "Analysis of Food Aroma"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensory and Consumer Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Thierry Thomas-Danguin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UMR CSGA (Centre des Sciences du Goût et de l’Alimentation), INRA, CNRS, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, F-21000 Dijon, France
Interests: food flavor; sensory evaluation; psychophysics; odor mixtures; cross-modal interactions
Prof. Dr. Yan Xu
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Industrial Biotechnology of Ministry of Education & School of Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu, China
Interests: wine; fermentation engineering; aroma; microbiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food preferences, food choice and sustainable food consumption are driven by food flavor, which has been repeatedly reported as having a major influence on food behavior. Among the food sensations central to flavor, the odor component is critical because it determines the identity and the typicality of the food, which support its overall quality and recognition by consumers. Therefore, sensory-driven flavor analysis is a core process to both better understand consumer food perception and guide healthy food product development by bridging the gap between product characteristics and consumer acceptance.

This Special Issue will encompass multiple aspects of the analysis of the food olfactory component from cutting-edge chemical analytical techniques of odor-active compounds to dynamic sensory evaluation methods. Advanced approaches that aim to model and visualize the complex relationships between the chemical composition of food and its perceived aroma are welcomed. Because of the complexity of natural food odor, flavor scientists must deal with highly intricate perceptual interactions that have repercussions on the reconstitution of the food odor signature and the identification of its key odorants. Thus, innovative recombination/omission and other mixture-based strategies will be included. Additionally, studies focusing on the role of human physiology and brain processing in food odor perception are encouraged.

Overall, this Special Issue of Foods will contain contributions from leading experts in the field of food odor analysis in relation to food product composition and development, food sensory perception and consumer liking, well-being and health.

Dr. Thierry Thomas-Danguin
Prof. Dr. Yan Xu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • flavor
  • food odor
  • odorants
  • food choice
  • consumer acceptance
  • food innovation

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Two Different Irrigation Systems on the Amino Acid Concentrations, Volatile Composition and Sensory Profiles of Godello Musts and Wines
Foods 2019, 8(4), 135; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8040135 - 22 Apr 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The concentrations of amino acids and volatile compounds of a given grapevine cultivar may be modified by climate variability between years and by management practices, such as irrigation, that may alter the typicality of its wines. The current study aimed at assessing the [...] Read more.
The concentrations of amino acids and volatile compounds of a given grapevine cultivar may be modified by climate variability between years and by management practices, such as irrigation, that may alter the typicality of its wines. The current study aimed at assessing the amino acid profile of musts and wines, volatile composition and sensory profile of wines from Vitis vinifera (L.) cultivar Godello under rain-fed and two drip irrigation systems (above, drip irrigation (DI), and under the soil surface, subsurface drip irrigation (SDI)) over three consecutive years. Irrigation tended to increase must and wine total acidity; however, it did not alter must amino acid concentrations significantly. Irrigation reduced the concentrations of acetaldehyde and methanol in Godello wines. Moreover, irrigation tended to decrease the concentrations of compounds giving fruity aromas, such as acetaldehyde (by 31% in SDI) and isoamyl acetate (by 21% in SDI), when compared to rain-fed conditions. Sensory analysis revealed slight differences between treatments. Rain-fed and SDI were the treatments showing the greatest differences. Weather conditions affected more must and wine composition than in-season effects caused by irrigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of Food Aroma)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Chemical Fingerprinting of Seeds of Some Salvia Species in Turkey by Using GC-MS and FTIR
Foods 2019, 8(4), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8040118 - 04 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Six species of Salvia seeds cultivated and grown in Cumra/Konya (Turkey) were evaluated using headspace gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) combined chemometrics of hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). The major volatile [...] Read more.
Six species of Salvia seeds cultivated and grown in Cumra/Konya (Turkey) were evaluated using headspace gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) combined chemometrics of hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). The major volatile compounds in the Salvia species are determined as n-hexanal (present in seven samples), sabinene (present in three samples), α-pinene (present in 13 samples), α-thujone (present in four samples), borneol (present in 11 samples), linalyl acetate (present in 10 samples), β-pinene (present in 13 samples), camphene (present in 13 samples), α-thujene (present in four samples), 2,4(10)-thujadien (present in two samples), β-myrcene (present in seven samples), limonen (present in 12 samples), 1,8-cineole (eucalyptol) (present in 13 samples) and camphor (present in nine samples). The most abundant (%) volatile compounds among all were detected as α-pinene, camphene, β-pinene and eucalyptol. For the first time, chemometrics of HCA and PCA is applied to FTIR and GC-MS data. The classification of all samples is performed on the basis of their chemical similarities and differences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of Food Aroma)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Harvest Time on the Aroma of White Wines Made from Cold-Hardy Brianna and Frontenac Gris Grapes Using Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Olfactometry
Foods 2019, 8(1), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8010029 - 16 Jan 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
The Midwest wine industry has shown a marked increase in growers, hectares planted, wineries, and wine production. This growth coincides with the release of cold-hardy cultivars such as Brianna and Frontenac gris, in 2001 and 2003, respectively. These white grape varieties account for [...] Read more.
The Midwest wine industry has shown a marked increase in growers, hectares planted, wineries, and wine production. This growth coincides with the release of cold-hardy cultivars such as Brianna and Frontenac gris, in 2001 and 2003, respectively. These white grape varieties account for one-third of the total area grown in the state of Iowa. It is generally accepted that the wine aroma profile plays a crucial role in developing a local, sustainable brand. However, the identity of Brianna/Frontenac Gris-based wine aromas and their link to the grape berry chemistry at harvest is unknown. This study aims to preliminarily characterize key odor-active compounds that can influence the aroma profile in wines made from Brianna and Frontenac gris grapes harvested at different stages of ripening. Brianna and Frontenac gris grapes were harvested approximately 7 days apart, starting at 15.4 °Brix (3.09 pH) and 19.5 °Brix (3.00 pH), respectively. Small batch fermentations were made for each time point with all juices adjusted to the same °Brix prior to fermentation. Odor-active compounds were extracted from wine headspace using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and simultaneous olfactometry (O). Over 30 odor-active compounds were detected. Aromas in Brianna wines developed from “cotton candy” and “floral”, to “banana” and “butterscotch”, then finally to “honey”, “caramel” and an unknown neutral aroma. Frontenac gris wines changed from an unknown neutral aroma to “fruity” and “rose”. Results from the lay audiences’ flavor and aroma descriptors also indicate a shift with harvest date and associated °Brix. To date, this is the first report of wine aromas from Brianna and Frontenac gris by GC-MS-O. Findings from this research support the hypothesis that aroma profiles of Brianna and Frontenac gris wines can be influenced by harvesting the grapes at different stages of ripening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of Food Aroma)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Aromatic Profiles of Essential Oils from Five Commonly Used Thai Basils
Foods 2018, 7(11), 175; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7110175 - 24 Oct 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
The research objectives of this study are to analyse the volatile compositions of different basil types available in Thai markets and to descriptively determine their aromatic qualities. Essential oils were hydro-distillated from fresh leaves of two Holy basil (Ocimum sanctum) varieties [...] Read more.
The research objectives of this study are to analyse the volatile compositions of different basil types available in Thai markets and to descriptively determine their aromatic qualities. Essential oils were hydro-distillated from fresh leaves of two Holy basil (Ocimum sanctum) varieties namely, white and red and other basil species, including Tree basil (O. gratissimum), Thai basil (O. basilicum var. thyrsiflorum), and Lemon basil (O. citriodorum). Oil physiochemical characteristics and volatile chromatograms from Gas ChromatographyMass Spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the chemical compositions. Estragole, eugenol, and methyl eugenol were among the major volatiles found in the essential oils of these basil types. Classification by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) advised that these Ocimum spp. samples are grouped based on either the distinctive anise, citrus aroma (estragole, geranial and neral), or spice-like aroma (methyl eugenol, β-caryophyllene, and α-cubebene). The essential oils were also used for descriptive sensorial determination by five semi-trained panellists, using the following developed terms: anise, citrus, herb, spice, sweet, and woody. The panellists were able to differentiate essential oils of white Holy basil from red Holy basil based on the intensity of the anisic attribute, while the anise and citrus scents were detected as dominant in the Lemon basil, Tree basil, and Thai basil essential oils. The overall benefit from this research was the elucidation of aromatic qualities from Thai common Ocimum species in order to assess their potential as the raw materials for new food products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of Food Aroma)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop