Special Issue "Extraction Strategies to Recover Bioactive Compounds, Incorporation into Food and Health Benefits"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Security and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. María del Mar Contreras
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical, Environmental and Materials Engineering, Universidad de Jaén, Campus Las Lagunillas, 23071 Jaén, Spain
Interests: chemometrics; bioactive compounds; food analysis; food byproducts
Prof. Dr. Eulogio Castro
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical, Environmental and Materials Engineering and Center for Advanced Studies in Energy and Environment, Universidad de Jaén, Campus Las Lagunillas, 23071 Jaén, Spain
Interests: biomass valorization; agricultural residues; biofuels; bioactive compounds
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The general purpose of this Special Issue, “Extraction Strategies to Recover Bioactive Compounds, Incorporation into Food, and Health Benefits”, is to expand the information on bioactive compounds when applied to the food industry. Therefore, the objectives are: To address new ways to extract bioactive compounds (phytochemicals, proteins, peptides, fatty acids, etc.) from raw material in a sustainable way and using food grade conditions, to incorporate these bioactive compounds into the food matrix, and to evaluate their health benefits. There are numerous studies in literature on different bioactive products (extracts, essential oils, oleoresins, hydrolysates, etc.) that possess numerous health benefits against diseases and disorders of the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive system, etc. Therefore, this Special Issue will discuss ways to recover different bioactive types and to incorporate them into the food matrix. Moreover, the health benefit has to be supported in the food. Furthermore, the valorization of agri-food waste is a challenge and obtaining bio-based products based on bioactive compounds is a plausible way. We are particularly interested in studies focusing on the extraction of bioactive compounds, including antioxidants, from agri-food residues and guided at the study of their health benefits and functional food applications.

Dr. María del Mar Contreras
Prof. Dr. Eulogio Castro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antioxidants
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Fatty acids
  • Food grade
  • Functional food
  • Healthy food
  • Carotenoids
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Peptides
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Integrated Process for Sequential Extraction of Bioactive Phenolic Compounds and Proteins from Mill and Field Olive Leaves and Effects on the Lignocellulosic Profile
Foods 2019, 8(11), 531; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8110531 - 29 Oct 2019
Abstract
The extraction of bioactive compounds in a biorefinery context could be a way to valorize agri-food byproducts, but there is a remaining part that also requires attention. Therefore, in this work the integrated extraction of phenolic compounds, including the bioactive oleuropein, and proteins [...] Read more.
The extraction of bioactive compounds in a biorefinery context could be a way to valorize agri-food byproducts, but there is a remaining part that also requires attention. Therefore, in this work the integrated extraction of phenolic compounds, including the bioactive oleuropein, and proteins from olive mill leaves was addressed following three schemes, including the use of ultrasound. This affected the total phenolic content (4475.5–6166.9 mg gallic acid equivalents/100 g), oleuropein content (675.3–1790.0 mg/100 g), and antioxidant activity (18,234.3–25,459.0 µmol trolox equivalents/100 g). No effect was observed on either the protein recovery or the content of sugars and lignin in the extraction residues. Concerning the recovery of proteins, three operational parameters were evaluated by response surface methodology. The optimum (63.1%) was achieved using NaOH 0.7 M at 100 °C for 240 min. Then, the selected scheme was applied to olive leaves from the field, observing differences in the content of some of the studied components. It also changed the lignocellulosic profile of the extraction residues of both leaf types, which were enriched in cellulose. Overall, these results could be useful to diversify the valorization chain in the olive sector. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Phenolic Compounds from Sesame Cake and Antioxidant Activity: A New Insight for Agri-Food Residues’ Significance for Sustainable Development
Foods 2019, 8(10), 432; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100432 - 22 Sep 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Agri-food residues represent a rich source of nutrients and bioactive secondary metabolites, including phenolic compounds. The effective utilization of these by-products in food supplements and the nutraceuticals industry could provide a way of valorization in the transition to becoming more sustainable. In this [...] Read more.
Agri-food residues represent a rich source of nutrients and bioactive secondary metabolites, including phenolic compounds. The effective utilization of these by-products in food supplements and the nutraceuticals industry could provide a way of valorization in the transition to becoming more sustainable. In this context, the present study describes the phenolic profiling of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) cake using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection and quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. Compounds were characterized based on their retention time, UV spectra, accurate mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS data along with comparison with standards, whenever possible, and the relevant literature. The characterized compounds (112 metabolites) belong to several classes, namely, phenolic acids (hydroxybenzoic acids and hydroxycinnamic acids), flavonoids, and lignans. Moreover, organic acids and some nitrogenous compounds were characterized. The total phenol content and the antioxidant activity of the cake extract were determined. This study provides useful information for the valorization of by-products from the sesame oil industry. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Biocompounds Content Prediction in Ecuadorian Fruits Using a Mathematical Model
Foods 2019, 8(8), 284; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8080284 - 25 Jul 2019
Abstract
Anthocyanins, carotenoids and polyphenols are biomolecules that give the characteristic color to fruits. Carotenoids relate to yellow, orange and red colors whereas anthocyanins and polyphenols mainly relate to purple and red colors. Presently, standard determination of antioxidants is carried out using relatively complex [...] Read more.
Anthocyanins, carotenoids and polyphenols are biomolecules that give the characteristic color to fruits. Carotenoids relate to yellow, orange and red colors whereas anthocyanins and polyphenols mainly relate to purple and red colors. Presently, standard determination of antioxidants is carried out using relatively complex methods and techniques. The aim of this study was to develop a mathematical prediction model to relate the internal color parameters of the Amazonic fruits araza (Eugenia stipitata Mc Vaugh), Andean fruit blackberry (Rubus glaucus Benth), Andean blueberry (Vaccinium floribundum Kunth), goldenberry (Physalis peruviana L.), naranjilla (Solanum quitoense Lam.), and tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) to their respective anthocyanins, carotenoids and polyphenols contents. The mathematical model was effective in predicting the total anthocyanins content (TAC), the total carotenoids content (TCC) and finally the total phenolic content (TPC) of fruits assayed. Andean blueberry presented a TPC with an experimental value of 7254.62 (mg GAE/100 g sample) with respect to a TPC prediction value of 7315.73 (mg GAE/100 g sample). Andean blackberry presented a TAC with an experimental value of 1416.69 (mg chloride cyanidin 3-glucoside/100 g) with respect to a prediction TAC value of 1413 (mg chloride cyanidin 3-glucoside/100 g). Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Bioprocessed Production of Resveratrol-Enriched Rice Wine: Simultaneous Rice Wine Fermentation, Extraction, and Transformation of Piceid to Resveratrol from Polygonum cuspidatum Roots
Foods 2019, 8(7), 258; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8070258 - 15 Jul 2019
Abstract
A new bioprocess to produce resveratrol-enriched rice wine was established and the effects of adding Polygonum cuspidatum root powder to rice wine fermentation were investigated. In this new process, piceid and resveratrol were extracted from P. cuspidatum roots to rice wine and piceid [...] Read more.
A new bioprocess to produce resveratrol-enriched rice wine was established and the effects of adding Polygonum cuspidatum root powder to rice wine fermentation were investigated. In this new process, piceid and resveratrol were extracted from P. cuspidatum roots to rice wine and piceid was converted to resveratrol by β-glucosidase during fermentation. After 10 days co-fermentation, rice wine with high levels of resveratrol was obtained, which contained ~14% (v/v) ethanol, 122 mg/L piceid, and 86 mg/L resveratrol. The resveratrol-enriched rice wine had enhanced antioxidant activity with significantly stronger 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, ferric ion reducing power, and ferrous ion chelating capability. Ultrafiltration (UF) was employed in this study using hollow fibers to clarify the end product, increase shelf life without heat treatment, and maintain the quality of the phenolic compounds. The boiled and UF-treated rice wine were evaluated for ethanol, piceid, resveratrol, clarity, aerobic plate count, total acidity, pH, reducing sugars, and amino acids. The quality of the resveratrol-enriched rice wine was maintained after four weeks storage at normal refrigeration temperatures. Full article
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