Special Issue "Recent Advances and Trends in the Dairy Field"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 12856

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Esther Sendra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
AgroFood Technology Department, Escuela Politécnica Superior de Orihuela, Miguel Hernández University, Orihuela, Spain
Interests: dairy foods; functional dairy products: probiotics, prebiotics and fibers; effect of animal feeding on milk quality and properties; foods of animal origin; quality and product development and improvement; fatty acid analysis of foods; gas chromatography
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Jordi Saldo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Animal and Food Science, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: by-product valorisation; process control; textural properties; fermented food products; functional food products; spectroscopic analysis; sensory evaluation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The dairy field is one of the most dynamic and challenging fields in food science and technology. Compiling reviews from international research groups highly active in the field will provide valuable insights into the present state of the art, challenges, innovative approaches, and needs.

This Special Issue aims to include reviews on all factors influencing the properties of milk and dairy products, including their composition, functionality, nutritional value, microbiology, biotechnology, production, processing, quality, safety, and consumer acceptability. It also covers dairy sustainability issues such as the use of alternative feed for milking animals, precision farming, and water and carbon footprint for dairy farming. Dairy-based ingredients and byproducts from dairy industries and their technological and nutritional functionality will be included in the scope of this Special Issue.

Given your expertise and excellence in research in dairy science and technology, we cordially invite you to send a review paper of your research to be published in a Special Issue of Foods. The Special Issue will focus on recent advances, trends, and relevant summaries of research in all aspects related to milk and dairy foods. We aim to compile reviews from international research groups highly active in the field to provide valuable insights into the present state of the art, challenges, innovative approaches, and needs of dairy science and technology.

Thank you for considering our invitation.

Dr. Esther Sendra
Prof. Dr. Jordi Saldo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dairy
  • Infant formula
  • Dairy microbiology
  • Proteomics
  • Metabolomics
  • Biotechnology
  • Quality and safety
  • Sensory analysis
  • Health claims
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Review

Review
Effect of Protein Genotypes on Physicochemical Properties and Protein Functionality of Bovine Milk: A Review
Foods 2021, 10(10), 2409; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10102409 - 11 Oct 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 950
Abstract
Milk protein comprises caseins (CNs) and whey proteins, each of which has different genetic variants. Several studies have reported the frequencies of these genetic variants and the effects of variants on milk physicochemical properties and functionality. For example, the C variant and the [...] Read more.
Milk protein comprises caseins (CNs) and whey proteins, each of which has different genetic variants. Several studies have reported the frequencies of these genetic variants and the effects of variants on milk physicochemical properties and functionality. For example, the C variant and the BC haplotype of αS1-casein (αS1-CN), β-casein (β-CN) B and A1 variants, and κ-casein (κ-CN) B variant, are favourable for rennet coagulation, as well as the B variant of β-lactoglobulin (β-lg). κ-CN is reported to be the only protein influencing acid gel formation, with the AA variant contributing to a firmer acid curd. For heat stability, κ-CN B variant improves the heat resistance of milk at natural pH, and the order of heat stability between phenotypes is BB > AB > AA. The A2 variant of β-CN is more efficient in emulsion formation, but the emulsion stability is lower than the A1 and B variants. Foaming properties of milk with β-lg variant B are better than A, but the differences between β-CN A1 and A2 variants are controversial. Genetic variants of milk proteins also influence milk yield, composition, quality and processability; thus, study of such relationships offers guidance for the selection of targeted genetic variants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Trends in the Dairy Field)
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Review
Cold Microfiltration as an Enabler of Sustainable Dairy Protein Ingredient Innovation
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2091; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092091 - 04 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1094
Abstract
Classically, microfiltration (0.1–0.5 µm) of bovine skim milk is performed at warm temperatures (45–55 °C), to produce micellar casein and milk-derived whey protein ingredients. Microfiltration at these temperatures is associated with high initial permeate flux and allows for the retention of the casein [...] Read more.
Classically, microfiltration (0.1–0.5 µm) of bovine skim milk is performed at warm temperatures (45–55 °C), to produce micellar casein and milk-derived whey protein ingredients. Microfiltration at these temperatures is associated with high initial permeate flux and allows for the retention of the casein fraction, resulting in a whey protein fraction of high purity. Increasingly, however, the microfiltration of skim milk and other dairy streams at low temperatures (≤20 °C) is being used in the dairy industry. The trend towards cold filtration has arisen due to associated benefits of improved microbial quality and reduced fouling, allowing for extended processing times, improved product quality and opportunities for more sustainable processing. Performing microfiltration of skim milk at low temperatures also alters the protein profile and mineral composition of the resulting processing streams, allowing for the generation of new ingredients. However, the use of low processing temperatures is associated with high mechanical energy consumption to compensate for the increased viscosity, and thermal energy consumption for inline cooling, impacting the sustainability of the process. This review will examine the differences between warm and cold microfiltration in terms of membrane performance, partitioning of bovine milk constituents, microbial growth, ingredient innovation and process sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Trends in the Dairy Field)
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Review
Current Trends of Enterococci in Dairy Products: A Comprehensive Review of Their Multiple Roles
Foods 2021, 10(4), 821; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040821 - 10 Apr 2021
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 1466
Abstract
As a genus that has evolved for resistance against adverse environmental factors and that readily exchanges genetic elements, enterococci are well adapted to the cheese environment and may reach high numbers in artisanal cheeses. Their metabolites impact cheese flavor, texture, and rheological properties, [...] Read more.
As a genus that has evolved for resistance against adverse environmental factors and that readily exchanges genetic elements, enterococci are well adapted to the cheese environment and may reach high numbers in artisanal cheeses. Their metabolites impact cheese flavor, texture, and rheological properties, thus contributing to the development of its typical sensorial properties. Due to their antimicrobial activity, enterococci modulate the cheese microbiota, stimulate autolysis of other lactic acid bacteria (LAB), control pathogens and deterioration microorganisms, and may offer beneficial effects to the health of their hosts. They could in principle be employed as adjunct/protective/probiotic cultures; however, due to their propensity to acquire genetic determinants of virulence and antibiotic resistance, together with the opportunistic character of some of its members, this genus does not possess Qualified Presumption of Safety (QPS) status. It is, however, noteworthy that some putative virulence factors described in foodborne enterococci may simply reflect adaptation to the food environment and to the human host as commensal. Further research is needed to help distinguish friend from foe among enterococci, eventually enabling exploitation of the beneficial aspects of specific cheese-associated strains. This review aims at discussing both beneficial and deleterious roles played by enterococci in artisanal cheeses, while highlighting the need for further research on such a remarkably hardy genus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Trends in the Dairy Field)
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Review
Microbial Interactions within the Cheese Ecosystem and Their Application to Improve Quality and Safety
Foods 2021, 10(3), 602; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030602 - 12 Mar 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1773
Abstract
The cheese microbiota comprises a consortium of prokaryotic, eukaryotic and viral populations, among which lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are majority components with a prominent role during manufacturing and ripening. The assortment, numbers and proportions of LAB and other microbial biotypes making up the [...] Read more.
The cheese microbiota comprises a consortium of prokaryotic, eukaryotic and viral populations, among which lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are majority components with a prominent role during manufacturing and ripening. The assortment, numbers and proportions of LAB and other microbial biotypes making up the microbiota of cheese are affected by a range of biotic and abiotic factors. Cooperative and competitive interactions between distinct members of the microbiota may occur, with rheological, organoleptic and safety implications for ripened cheese. However, the mechanistic details of these interactions, and their functional consequences, are largely unknown. Acquiring such knowledge is important if we are to predict when fermentations will be successful and understand the causes of technological failures. The experimental use of “synthetic” microbial communities might help throw light on the dynamics of different cheese microbiota components and the interplay between them. Although synthetic communities cannot reproduce entirely the natural microbial diversity in cheese, they could help reveal basic principles governing the interactions between microbial types and perhaps allow multi-species microbial communities to be developed as functional starters. By occupying the whole ecosystem taxonomically and functionally, microbiota-based cultures might be expected to be more resilient and efficient than conventional starters in the development of unique sensorial properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Trends in the Dairy Field)
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Review
Plant-Based Alternatives to Yogurt: State-of-the-Art and Perspectives of New Biotechnological Challenges
Foods 2021, 10(2), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020316 - 03 Feb 2021
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 3948
Abstract
Due to the increasing demand for milk alternatives, related to both health and ethical needs, plant-based yogurt-like products have been widely explored in recent years. With the main goal to obtain snacks similar to the conventional yogurt in terms of textural and sensory [...] Read more.
Due to the increasing demand for milk alternatives, related to both health and ethical needs, plant-based yogurt-like products have been widely explored in recent years. With the main goal to obtain snacks similar to the conventional yogurt in terms of textural and sensory properties and ability to host viable lactic acid bacteria for a long-time storage, several plant-derived ingredients (e.g., cereals, pseudocereals, legumes, and fruits) as well as technological solutions (e.g., enzymatic and thermal treatments) have been investigated. The central role of fermentation in yogurt-like production led to specific selections of lactic acid bacteria strains to be used as starters to guarantee optimal textural (e.g., through the synthesis of exo-polysaccharydes), nutritional (high protein digestibility and low content of anti-nutritional compounds), and functional (synthesis of bioactive compounds) features of the products. This review provides an overview of the novel insights on fermented yogurt-like products. The state-of-the-art on the use of unconventional ingredients, traditional and innovative biotechnological processes, and the effects of fermentation on the textural, nutritional, functional, and sensory features, and the shelf life are described. The supplementation of prebiotics and probiotics and the related health effects are also reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Trends in the Dairy Field)
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Review
Unravelling Conformational Aspects of Milk Protein Structure—Contributions from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies
Foods 2020, 9(8), 1128; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081128 - 16 Aug 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1819
Abstract
Changes in the molecular structure and association of milk proteins lead to many desirable (under controlled conditions) or undesirable characteristics of dairy products. Several methods have been used to study the structure of milk proteins and changes therein in different environments. Whey proteins [...] Read more.
Changes in the molecular structure and association of milk proteins lead to many desirable (under controlled conditions) or undesirable characteristics of dairy products. Several methods have been used to study the structure of milk proteins and changes therein in different environments. Whey proteins are an excellent model for secondary structure studies using circular dichroism (CD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and tertiary structure studies using X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, caseins, the most abundant protein class in milk, are far more difficult to characterize. The tertiary structure of caseins cannot be observed by X-ray crystallography due to the inability to crystallize caseins. However, NMR is an appropriate approach for structural elucidation. Thus far, NMR was applied on specific peptides of individual caseins of the molecules including phosphoserine centers and colloidal calcium phosphate. The literature focuses on these parts of the molecule due to its importance in building the sub-unit particles involving individual caseins and calcium phosphate nanoclusters. This review focuses on present structural studies of milk proteins using NMR and their importance in dairy processing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Trends in the Dairy Field)
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