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Cold Microfiltration as an Enabler of Sustainable Dairy Protein Ingredient Innovation

School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, T12 TP07 Cork, Ireland
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Academic Editors: Esther Sendra and Jordi Saldo
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2091; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092091
Received: 30 July 2021 / Revised: 29 August 2021 / Accepted: 1 September 2021 / Published: 4 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Trends in the Dairy Field)
Classically, microfiltration (0.1–0.5 µm) of bovine skim milk is performed at warm temperatures (45–55 °C), to produce micellar casein and milk-derived whey protein ingredients. Microfiltration at these temperatures is associated with high initial permeate flux and allows for the retention of the casein fraction, resulting in a whey protein fraction of high purity. Increasingly, however, the microfiltration of skim milk and other dairy streams at low temperatures (≤20 °C) is being used in the dairy industry. The trend towards cold filtration has arisen due to associated benefits of improved microbial quality and reduced fouling, allowing for extended processing times, improved product quality and opportunities for more sustainable processing. Performing microfiltration of skim milk at low temperatures also alters the protein profile and mineral composition of the resulting processing streams, allowing for the generation of new ingredients. However, the use of low processing temperatures is associated with high mechanical energy consumption to compensate for the increased viscosity, and thermal energy consumption for inline cooling, impacting the sustainability of the process. This review will examine the differences between warm and cold microfiltration in terms of membrane performance, partitioning of bovine milk constituents, microbial growth, ingredient innovation and process sustainability. View Full-Text
Keywords: microfiltration; cold MF; partitioning; membrane fouling microfiltration; cold MF; partitioning; membrane fouling
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MDPI and ACS Style

France, T.C.; Kelly, A.L.; Crowley, S.V.; O’Mahony, J.A. Cold Microfiltration as an Enabler of Sustainable Dairy Protein Ingredient Innovation. Foods 2021, 10, 2091. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092091

AMA Style

France TC, Kelly AL, Crowley SV, O’Mahony JA. Cold Microfiltration as an Enabler of Sustainable Dairy Protein Ingredient Innovation. Foods. 2021; 10(9):2091. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092091

Chicago/Turabian Style

France, Thomas C., Alan L. Kelly, Shane V. Crowley, and James A. O’Mahony. 2021. "Cold Microfiltration as an Enabler of Sustainable Dairy Protein Ingredient Innovation" Foods 10, no. 9: 2091. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092091

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