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Microbial Interactions within the Cheese Ecosystem and Their Application to Improve Quality and Safety

Departamento de Microbiología y Bioquímica, Instituto de Productos Lácteos de Asturias (IPLA), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Paseo Río Linares s/n, 33300 Villaviciosa, Spain
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Academic Editors: Esther Sendra and Jordi Saldo
Foods 2021, 10(3), 602; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030602
Received: 25 February 2021 / Accepted: 9 March 2021 / Published: 12 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Trends in the Dairy Field)
The cheese microbiota comprises a consortium of prokaryotic, eukaryotic and viral populations, among which lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are majority components with a prominent role during manufacturing and ripening. The assortment, numbers and proportions of LAB and other microbial biotypes making up the microbiota of cheese are affected by a range of biotic and abiotic factors. Cooperative and competitive interactions between distinct members of the microbiota may occur, with rheological, organoleptic and safety implications for ripened cheese. However, the mechanistic details of these interactions, and their functional consequences, are largely unknown. Acquiring such knowledge is important if we are to predict when fermentations will be successful and understand the causes of technological failures. The experimental use of “synthetic” microbial communities might help throw light on the dynamics of different cheese microbiota components and the interplay between them. Although synthetic communities cannot reproduce entirely the natural microbial diversity in cheese, they could help reveal basic principles governing the interactions between microbial types and perhaps allow multi-species microbial communities to be developed as functional starters. By occupying the whole ecosystem taxonomically and functionally, microbiota-based cultures might be expected to be more resilient and efficient than conventional starters in the development of unique sensorial properties. View Full-Text
Keywords: cheese; cheese microbiota; lactic acid bacteria; starters; adjunct cultures; cheese quality; cheese safety; high throughput sequencing; microbial interactions; community assembly cheese; cheese microbiota; lactic acid bacteria; starters; adjunct cultures; cheese quality; cheese safety; high throughput sequencing; microbial interactions; community assembly
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mayo, B.; Rodríguez, J.; Vázquez, L.; Flórez, A.B. Microbial Interactions within the Cheese Ecosystem and Their Application to Improve Quality and Safety. Foods 2021, 10, 602. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030602

AMA Style

Mayo B, Rodríguez J, Vázquez L, Flórez AB. Microbial Interactions within the Cheese Ecosystem and Their Application to Improve Quality and Safety. Foods. 2021; 10(3):602. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030602

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mayo, Baltasar, Javier Rodríguez, Lucía Vázquez, and Ana B. Flórez. 2021. "Microbial Interactions within the Cheese Ecosystem and Their Application to Improve Quality and Safety" Foods 10, no. 3: 602. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030602

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