Special Issue "Sensors Application in Food Analysis and Detection"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Thierry Noguer

Laboratoire BAE, Université de Perpignan Via Domitia, 52 Avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan cedex 9, France
E-Mail
Interests: biochemistry; analytical chemistry; electrochemistry; molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs)
Guest Editor
Dr. Carole Calas-Blanchard

Laboratoire BAE, Université de Perpignan Via Domitia, 52 Avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan cedex 9, France
E-Mail
Interests: biosensors; analytical chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to its continuous development, the agri-food industry is increasingly in need of analytics to control food quality and safety. This need arises, not only from a request from regulatory bodies, but also from an increasing concern of consumers for the quality of their diet, in close relation to their well-being and health. Analytical techniques are therefore becoming of high importance for the control or verification of food components (sugars, proteins, fats, vitamins, etc.), but also for the detection of unexpected contaminants, including pesticides, toxins, drugs and allergens. Many physico-chemical and immunochemical methods have been developed so far for the control of production processes and contaminants detection. However, these conventional methods are cumbersome to implement, require pre-treatment of the sample, expensive equipment and high purity solvents. In this context, the development of easy-to-handle and portative tools appears for many researchers as a potential alternative to conventional techniques. This Special Issue will more particularly focus on recent advances in biosensors directed to monitoring of food components and detection of undesirable compounds.

Prof. Thierry Noguer
Dr. Carole Calas-Blanchard
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biosensors
  • food monitoring
  • pesticides
  • toxins
  • allergens

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessCommunication Ethanol Measurement Using Hetero-Core Structured Optical Fiber Covered with Layer-By-Layer Thin Film
Received: 9 July 2018 / Revised: 23 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 25 July 2018
PDF Full-text (1230 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Ethanol measurements are performed in an ethanol/water solution utilizing an ethanol sensor based on a hetero-core structured optical fiber covered with a layer-by-layer thin film. The layer-by-layer (LbL) thin film was prepared using poly (allylamine hydrochloride) and poly styrene sulfonate. When the sensor
[...] Read more.
Ethanol measurements are performed in an ethanol/water solution utilizing an ethanol sensor based on a hetero-core structured optical fiber covered with a layer-by-layer thin film. The layer-by-layer (LbL) thin film was prepared using poly (allylamine hydrochloride) and poly styrene sulfonate. When the sensor was immersed in water, the propagating light intensity decreased with increasing ethanol concentration. This behavior suggested that the LbL film contracted due to the presence of ethanol, and the refractive index of the film increased, resulting in increasing propagating light leaks at the hetero-core of the fiber. The ethanol sensor was applied to a variety of spirits, and the propagating light intensity decreased with increasing ethanol concentration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors Application in Food Analysis and Detection)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Affinity Sensing Strategies for the Detection of Pesticides in Food
Received: 26 July 2018 / Revised: 28 August 2018 / Accepted: 3 September 2018 / Published: 5 September 2018
PDF Full-text (3311 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This is a review of recent affinity-based approaches that detect pesticides in food. The importance of the quantification and monitoring of pesticides is firstly discussed, followed by a description of the different approaches reported in the literature. The different sensing approaches are reported
[...] Read more.
This is a review of recent affinity-based approaches that detect pesticides in food. The importance of the quantification and monitoring of pesticides is firstly discussed, followed by a description of the different approaches reported in the literature. The different sensing approaches are reported according to the different recognition element used: antibodies, aptamers, or molecularly imprinted polymers. Schemes of detection and the main features of the assays are reported and commented upon. The large number of affinity sensors recently developed and tested on real samples demonstrate that this approach is ready to be validated to monitor the amount of pesticides used in food commodities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors Application in Food Analysis and Detection)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview Food Safety Analysis Using Electrochemical Biosensors
Received: 15 August 2018 / Revised: 28 August 2018 / Accepted: 29 August 2018 / Published: 1 September 2018
PDF Full-text (1011 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Rapid and precise analytical tools are essential for monitoring food safety and screening of any undesirable contaminants, allergens, or pathogens, which may cause significant health risks upon consumption. Substantial developments in analytical techniques have empowered the analyses and quantitation of these contaminants. However,
[...] Read more.
Rapid and precise analytical tools are essential for monitoring food safety and screening of any undesirable contaminants, allergens, or pathogens, which may cause significant health risks upon consumption. Substantial developments in analytical techniques have empowered the analyses and quantitation of these contaminants. However, conventional techniques are limited by delayed analysis times, expensive and laborious sample preparation, and the necessity for highly-trained workers. Therefore, prompt advances in electrochemical biosensors have supported significant gains in quantitative detection and screening of food contaminants and showed incredible potential as a means of defying such limitations. Apart from indicating high specificity towards the target analytes, these biosensors have also addressed the challenge of food industry by providing high analytical accuracy within complex food matrices. Here, we discuss some of the recent advances in this area and analyze the role and contributions made by electrochemical biosensors in the food industry. This article also reviews the key challenges we believe biosensors need to overcome to become the industry standard. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors Application in Food Analysis and Detection)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top