Future Perspectives and Challenges in Food Chemistry: Selected Papers from XIII Italian National Congress of Food Chemistry

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2024 | Viewed by 3052

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Department of Pharmacy, University of Napoli Federico II, Via D. Montesano 49, 80131 Napoli, Italy
Interests: food chemistry; safety; food safety; nutraceuticals; nanonutraceuticals; recovery from byproducts of the food industry; food contaminants; food supplements; contaminants; risk assessment; mycotoxins and secondary metabolites; chemistry and food education
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food Chemistry, in its many aspects, is the main topic of the XIII Italian National Congress of Food Chemistry to be held in Marsala, Sicily. This Special Issue is dedicated to Prof. Giacomo Dugo, Emeritus Professor at the University of Messina in Sicily and to his contribution to Food Chemistry. He is among the main iconic protagonists of the growth and development of Food Chemistry at many levels, ranging from scientific research to the on-field applications and dissemination of the knowledge regarding foods and food chemistry. His academic value and importance is internationally recognized as well as his constant encouragement and example in the research, engagement, and commitment to the Food Chemistry area.

Food Chemistry is growing, and its multidisciplinary nature can be a key tool to face the challenges ahead in terms of improving food quality, analysis, sustainability, and safety. At the same time, aspects involving food waste reduction, by-products of the food chain reuse, food supplements, nutraceuticals, novel foods, and beneficial substances contained in foods and their mechanism of action are among the topics of the Congress. The aim is targeting the future of food chemistry without forgetting its past and its development over the years. In this scenario, it is a relevant challenge to bring together research, agri-food chain control main players, regulator bodies, and stakeholders in the area of interest, especially in light of the continuous evolution and innovation of both European and International regulations. With this aim, we invite contributions of papers to this Special Issue, which collects the works presented at the Congress and is open to all contributions within the above-mentioned topics.

Prof. Dr. Antonello Santini
Prof. Dr. Giuseppa Di Bella
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • food analysis
  • food supplements
  • nutraceuticals
  • recovery
  • sustainability
  • safety
  • regulations
  • novel foods
  • bioactive compounds
  • mechanism of action
  • health and food

Published Papers (2 papers)

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18 pages, 1520 KiB  
Article
The Lipidic and Volatile Components of Coffee Pods and Capsules Packaged in an Alternative Multilayer Film
by Giulia Basile, Lucia De Luca, Martina Calabrese, Gianfranco Lambiase, Fabiana Pizzolongo and Raffaele Romano
Foods 2024, 13(5), 759; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13050759 - 29 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Coffee pods and capsules require packaging that guarantees the optimal coffee preservation. The chemical composition of coffee can undergo quality decay phenomena during storage, especially in terms of lipidic and volatile components. Amongst coffee packaging, aluminum multilayer materials are particularly widely diffused. However, [...] Read more.
Coffee pods and capsules require packaging that guarantees the optimal coffee preservation. The chemical composition of coffee can undergo quality decay phenomena during storage, especially in terms of lipidic and volatile components. Amongst coffee packaging, aluminum multilayer materials are particularly widely diffused. However, aluminum is a negative component because it is not recoverable in a mixed plastic structure and its specific weight gives significant weight to packaging. In this study, a multilayer film with a reduced content of aluminum was used to package coffe pods and capsules and compared to a standard film with an aluminum layer. Their influence on the peroxides and volatile organic compounds of two coffee blends, 100% Coffea arabica L., 50% Coffea arabica L., and 50% Coffea canephora var. robusta L., were studied during their 180-day shelf life. The predominant volatile organic compounds detected belonged to the class of furans and pyrazines. Both packaging materials used for both coffee blends in the pods and capsules showed no significant differences during storage. Thus, the alternative packaging with less aluminum had the same performance as the standard with the advantage of being more sustainable, reducing the packaging weight, with benefits for transportation, and preserving the coffee aroma during the shelf life. Full article
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17 pages, 4114 KiB  
Review
Morzeddhu: A Unique Example of a Traditional and Sustainable Typical Dish from Catanzaro
by Stefano Alcaro, Roberta Rocca, Maria Grazia Rotundo, Francesco Bianco and Luigi Scordamaglia
Foods 2024, 13(12), 1810; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13121810 - 8 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Morzeddhu” in the local dialect of Catanzaro (“Morzello” in Italian) is an official typical dish of the capital of the Calabria region. It is a peasant dish, almost unknown at an international level, that labels, in an extraordinary way, [...] Read more.
Morzeddhu” in the local dialect of Catanzaro (“Morzello” in Italian) is an official typical dish of the capital of the Calabria region. It is a peasant dish, almost unknown at an international level, that labels, in an extraordinary way, the culinary identity of Catanzaro, a city founded around the X century. After America’s discovery, its preparation was optimized and definitively fixed. Its recipe is strictly based on a cow’s “fifth quarter” combined with spicy and typical Mediterranean vegetables. Remarkably, no pork meat is used, and when all traditional ingredients are included in the complex and quite long preparation of this special dish, it can deserve the title of “Illustrissimo”. This review provides a scientific description of Illustrissimo, emphasizing its unique properties and connection to the circular economy, food security, and the Mediterranean diet. We also highlight its unique quality compared to other alternatives through an analysis of their nutritional facts and bioactive compounds. Nutritionally, offal and fifth quarter components are a rich source of high-quality protein, with lower levels of total fat and saturated fatty acids compared to other meat cuts. In essence, this dish offers a great example of a high-quality yet affordable meal, aligning perfectly with a Mediterranean diet. Full article
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