Special Issue "Recent Advances in Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality"

A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292). This special issue belongs to the section "Artificial Intelligence".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Kiyoshi Kiyokawa
Website
Guest Editor
Cybernetics and Reality Engineering (CARE) Laboratory, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Japan
Interests: augmented reality; mixed reality; virtual reality; human augmentation; 3D user interfaces
Prof. Dr. Mark Billinghurst
Website
Guest Editor
School of Information Technology and Mathematical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
Interests: augmented reality; empathic computing; virtual reality; interaction design; gesture based interfaces; multimodal interfaces
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, VR and AR technology have made remarkable progress. Their fundamental problems, such as tracking and registration, have been almost solved, and their applications for education, medicine, architecture, automobiles, advertising, entertainment, etc., that researchers dreamed of 20 years ago have been put to practical use today. As some basic research has come to fruition, expectations for VR and AR have increased, and opportunities for advanced studies have also expanded. What should remote communications be when real-time three-dimensional reconstruction is realized and 5G high-speed communication becomes widespread? What information should be selected and presented to the user when advanced situational awareness becomes possible? What kind of short- and long-term effects on our body and mind will be exhibited by augmented vision or body modification? VR and AR are not just high-level computing environments but are becoming the next generation of social infrastructure. Various technologies such as artificial intelligence, human augmentation, and brain science are progressing and merging with VR and AR to become a driving force that puts VR and AR to even higher levels.

This Special Issue calls for many interesting studies that will open up new horizons of VR and AR. In addition to research that has steadily improved existing issues, we welcome research papers that present new possibilities of VR and AR. Topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:

  • 360 video;
  • VR/AR applications;
  • Artificial intelligence/machine learning for VR/AR;
  • Brain science for VR/AR;
  • VR/AR collaboration;
  • Computer graphics for VR/AR; 
  • Computer vision for VR/AR;
  • Content creation and management for VR/AR;
  • Context awareness for VR/AR;
  • Education with VR/AR;
  • Multimodal VR/AR;
  • Display technologies for VR/AR;
  • Ethics/humanity in VR/AR;
  • Human augmentations with VR/AR;
  • Human–computer interactions in VR/AR; 
  • Human factors in VR/AR;
  • Perception/presence in VR/AR;
  • Physiological sensing for VR/AR;
  • User experience/usability in VR/AR;
  • Virtual humans/avatars in VR/AR;
  • Visualization/visual analytics with VR/AR;
  • Wellbeing with VR/AR.

Prof. Dr. Kiyoshi Kiyokawa
Prof. Dr. Mark Billinghurst
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Electronics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 360 video
  • VR/AR applications
  • Artificial intelligence/machine learning for VR/AR
  • Brain science for VR/AR
  • VR/AR collaboration
  • Computer graphics for VR/AR
  • Computer vision for VR/AR
  • Content creation and management for VR/AR
  • Context awareness for VR/AR
  • Education with VR/AR
  • Multimodal VR/AR
  • Display technologies for VR/AR
  • Ethics/humanity in VR/AR
  • Human augmentations with VR/AR
  • Human–computer interactions in VR/AR
  • Human factors in VR/AR
  • Perception/presence in VR/AR
  • Physiological sensing for VR/AR
  • User experience/usability in VR/AR
  • Virtual humans/avatars in VR/AR
  • Visualization/visual analytics with VR/AR
  • Wellbeing with VR/AR.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Wearable Augmented Reality Application for Shoulder Rehabilitation
Electronics 2019, 8(10), 1178; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics8101178 - 17 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Augmented reality (AR) technology is gaining popularity and scholarly interest in the rehabilitation sector because of the possibility to generate controlled, user-specific environmental and perceptual stimuli which motivate the patient, while still preserving the possibility to interact with the real environment and other [...] Read more.
Augmented reality (AR) technology is gaining popularity and scholarly interest in the rehabilitation sector because of the possibility to generate controlled, user-specific environmental and perceptual stimuli which motivate the patient, while still preserving the possibility to interact with the real environment and other subjects, including the rehabilitation specialist. The paper presents the first wearable AR application for shoulder rehabilitation, based on Microsoft HoloLens, with real-time markerless tracking of the user’s hand. Potentialities and current limits of commercial head-mounted displays (HMDs) are described for the target medical field, and details of the proposed application are reported. A serious game was designed starting from the analysis of a traditional rehabilitation exercise, taking into account HoloLens specifications to maximize user comfort during the AR rehabilitation session. The AR application implemented consistently meets the recommended target frame rate for immersive applications with HoloLens device: 60 fps. Moreover, the ergonomics and the motivational value of the proposed application were positively evaluated by a group of five rehabilitation specialists and 20 healthy subjects. Even if a larger study, including real patients, is necessary for a clinical validation of the proposed application, the results obtained encourage further investigations and the integration of additional technical features for the proposed AR application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Applications of Virtual Reality in Engineering and Product Design: Why, What, How, When and Where
Electronics 2020, 9(7), 1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics9071064 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
The research on the use of virtual reality (VR) in the design domain has been conducted in a fragmentary way so far, and some misalignments have emerged among scholars. In particular, the actual support of VR in early design phases and the diffusion [...] Read more.
The research on the use of virtual reality (VR) in the design domain has been conducted in a fragmentary way so far, and some misalignments have emerged among scholars. In particular, the actual support of VR in early design phases and the diffusion of practices involving VR in creative design stages are argued. In the present paper, we reviewed VR applications in design and categorized each of the collected 86 sources into multiple classes. These range from supported design functions to employed VR technologies and the use of systems complementing VR. The identified design functions include not only design activities traditionally supported by VR, such as 3D modelling, virtual prototyping, and product evaluation, but also co-design and design education beyond the early design phases. The possibility to support early design phases by means of VR is mirrored by the attention on products that involve an emotional dimension beyond functional aspects, which are particularly focused on in virtual assemblies and prototypes. Relevant matches between VR technologies and specific design functions have been individuated, although a clear separation between VR devices and supported design tasks cannot be claimed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop