Online Communities and E-learning

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Technology Enhanced Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 22926

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Congress of Researchers and Organisations for Cybercommunity, E-Learning and Socialnomics, Swansea SA1 9NN, UK
Interests: e-moderation; cyberhate; gamification; e-politics

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Guest Editor
Congress of Researchers and Organisations for Cybercommunity, E-Learning and Socialnomics. Swansea SA1 9NN, UK
Interests: e-dating; usability/accessibility research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

This Special Issue is seeking papers on Internet trolling and online participation in the context of the science, technology and engineering of educational systems.

It will draw together ways of providing online learning, including through e-tivities, serious games, gamification, managed learning environments, MOOCs, and virtual worlds. It will also look at ways of managing online learning, including e-moderation, dealing with wellbeing issues like digital addiction and cyberbullying as well as the digital divide and accessibility.

Topics covered and welcome for submission include the following:

* Participation inequality; lurking, the free-rider problem;
* Online harassment; flame trolling, cyberbullying, cyberstalking;
* Transgressive humour, ‘trolling for the lulz’, viral humour, R.I.P trolling;
* Online Community moderation, perspectives on ‘don’t feed the troll’, blocking users (i.e., ‘ban-hammering’);
* Online learning issues: retention, motivation;
* Participation initiatives: Classroom 2.0, eParticipation.

Dr. Jonathan Bishop
Dr. Jason Barratt
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • e-learning
  • online communities
  • virtual learning environments
  • gamification
  • digital addiction
  • e-moderation
  • e-tivities

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

26 pages, 711 KiB  
Review
A Worldwide Journey through Distance Education—From the Post Office to Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Realities, and Education during the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Agnieszka Pregowska, Karol Masztalerz, Magdalena Garlińska and Magdalena Osial
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(3), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11030118 - 11 Mar 2021
Cited by 81 | Viewed by 21464
Abstract
Surprisingly, distance education is quite an old concept. Its origins date back to the first correspondence-based course, which took place via the postal service in Boston, USA, in the 18th century. Rapid technological developments, especially in video and audio streaming, have increased the [...] Read more.
Surprisingly, distance education is quite an old concept. Its origins date back to the first correspondence-based course, which took place via the postal service in Boston, USA, in the 18th century. Rapid technological developments, especially in video and audio streaming, have increased the availability of such courses and moved learning into the virtual world. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, we are witnessing an accelerated revolution in the learning process, as nearly all forms of education have been shifted online. Will this have a destructive effect on the human psyche? Is humanity sufficiently aware and ready for such a dramatic change? Will we return to physical in-classroom studies, or is remote distance education set to become the new norm? In particular, in medicine, computer science, fine arts, or architectural design, such a rapid change in the way students learn can be quite challenging. In this paper, we provide an overview of the history of distance learning, taking into account teachers’ and students’ points of view in both secondary and higher education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Online Communities and E-learning)
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