Special Issue "Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology—Ongoing Challenges and Developments in the Future"

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2022 | Viewed by 1444

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Katrin Scheinemann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Pediatric Oncology - Hematology, Kantonsspital Aarau, Aarau, Switzerland
Interests: pediatric neurooncology; survivorship and long-term follow-up; AYA oncology
Dr. Maria Otth
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Division of Pediatric Oncology - Hematology, Kantonsspital Aarau, Aarau, Switzerland
Interests: survivorship and long-term follow-up; oncopolicy; AYA oncology
Prof. Dr. Uta Dirksen
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Pediatrics III, West German Cancer Centre, University Hospital Essen, 45147 Essen, Germany
Interests: translational research in bone sarcoma of young people; academia initiated clinical trials in bone sarcoma of young people; late effects and prevention
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The care of adolescents and young adult cancer patients remains a challenge for all healthcare providers as they neither fit into the pediatric nor the adult oncology world.

For this Special Issue on "Adolescent and young adult oncology—ongoing challenges and developments in the future", the aim is to present the full range of issues and topics within the AYA cancer world, including its current status but also future developments.

This Special Issue aims to look at the following main topics: tumor spectrum; treatment and treatment protocols; models of care; and survivorship and long-term follow-up, especially the psychosocial and economic impact.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: treatment for AYA cancer including special entities; outcomes; long-term sequelae including psychosocial, etc.; models of care for AYA oncology; and fertility.

I/We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Katrin Scheinemann
Dr. Maria Otth
Prof. Dr. Uta Dirksen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • AYA oncology
  • treatment
  • models of care
  • long-term follow-up
  • survivorship
  • fertility

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Recruiting Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors for Patient-Reported Outcome Research: Experiences and Sample Characteristics of the SURVAYA Study
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(8), 5407-5425; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29080428 - 29 Jul 2022
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Abstract
Background: Participation of Adolescents and Young Adults with cancer (AYAs: 18–39 years at time of diagnosis) in patient-reported outcome studies is warranted given the limited knowledge of (long-term) physical and psychosocial health outcomes. We examined the representativeness of AYAs participating in the study, [...] Read more.
Background: Participation of Adolescents and Young Adults with cancer (AYAs: 18–39 years at time of diagnosis) in patient-reported outcome studies is warranted given the limited knowledge of (long-term) physical and psychosocial health outcomes. We examined the representativeness of AYAs participating in the study, to observe the impact of various invitation methods on response rates and reasons for non-participation. Methods: A population-based, cross-sectional cohort study was performed among long-term (5–20 years) AYA cancer survivors. All participants were invited using various methods to fill in a questionnaire on their health outcomes, including enclosing a paper version of the questionnaire, and sending a reminder. Those who did not respond received a postcard in which they were asked to provide a reason for non-participation. Results: In total, 4.010 AYAs (response 36%) participated. Females, AYAs with a higher socio-economic status (SES), diagnosed more than 10 years ago, diagnosed with a central nervous system tumor, sarcoma, a lymphoid malignancy, stage III, or treated with systemic chemotherapy were more likely to participate. Including a paper questionnaire increased the response rate by 5% and sending a reminder by 13%. AYAs who did not participate were either not interested (47%) or did want to be reminded of their cancer (31%). Conclusions: Study participation was significantly lower among specific subgroups of AYA cancer survivors. Higher response rates were achieved when a paper questionnaire was included, and reminders were sent. To increase representativeness of future AYA study samples, recruitment strategies could focus on integrating patient-reported outcomes in clinical practice and involving AYA patients to promote participation in research. Full article
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Article
Setting Priorities for a Provincial Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Program
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(6), 4034-4053; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29060322 - 01 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Adolescent and young adult (AYA, ages 15–39 years) oncology patients are an underserved population with specialized needs. AYA programs are absent from most Canadian centers. We identified a priority list and sequence for new programs to address. Program goals, priorities, and activities were [...] Read more.
Adolescent and young adult (AYA, ages 15–39 years) oncology patients are an underserved population with specialized needs. AYA programs are absent from most Canadian centers. We identified a priority list and sequence for new programs to address. Program goals, priorities, and activities were developed through literature review, national consensus documents, and expert opinion. Health care providers (HCPs) involved in AYA cancer care, administrators, and patient and family representatives were engaged to co-develop program goals and activities. A modified Delphi technique was used through two iterations followed by an in-person meeting to prioritize program implementation. Consensus was defined as a mean score of less than 2.0 (not important) or 4.0 or greater (important). Items without consensus (scored between 2.0 and 3.99) were discussed at the in-person meeting. Sixty provincial stakeholders completed the Delphi survey across multiple disciplines. Twenty-seven stakeholders attended the in-person meeting. All goals were deemed important, except development of a research program. Patient implementation tasks ranked highest. Priority sequence of implementation was: patient care first, followed by HCP education; patient and family education; program sustainability plan; evaluation; research; then a model for multidisciplinary tumor board review. These represent key goals for new AYA oncology programs and a priority sequence of implementation. Full article
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