The 30th Anniversary of Current Oncology: Perspectives in Clinical Oncology Practice

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 7422

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N5E5, Canada
2. Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, Saskatoon Cancer Center, Saskatoon, SK S7N5H5, Canada
Interests: clinical trial; population health; breast cancer; gastrointestinal cancers
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The year 2024 marks the 30th anniversary of Current Oncology, a peer-reviewed open access journal on clinical oncology. To date, the journal has published more than 3,800 papers from more than 13,000 authors, from 98 countries. This milestone cannot be achieved without our readers, authors, peer reviewers, editors, and all the people working for the journal who have combined their tremendous efforts over the years.

To mark this important milestone, a Special Issue entitled “The 30th Anniversary of Current Oncology: Perspectives in Clinical Oncology Practice” is being launched. This Special Issue collects high-quality research articles and review papers on topics related to the latest developments in clinical oncology. We encourage all research groups to submit up-to-date and comprehensive reviews and research findings on this topic.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Prof. Dr. Shahid Ahmed
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • clinical oncology
  • cancers
  • clinical trials

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 150 KiB  
Editorial
Innovation and Discovery: A 30-Year Journey in Advancing Cancer Care
by Shahid Ahmed
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(4), 2109-2111; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31040156 - 8 Apr 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1066
Abstract
Since the inaugural issue of Current Oncology was published 30 years ago, we have witnessed significant advancements in cancer research and care [...] Full article

Research

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11 pages, 2951 KiB  
Article
The Mediating Role of Exercise in Depression and Fatigue in Patients with Advanced Cancer
by Caterina Calderon, Marina Gustems, Berta Obispo, Teresa García-García, Raquel Hernández, Ana Fernández-Montes and Paula Jiménez-Fonseca
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(6), 3006-3016; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31060229 - 28 May 2024
Viewed by 478
Abstract
This study explored the interconnections between sociodemographic elements, depression, fatigue, and exercise in patients suffering from incurable neoplasm, particularly emphasizing the mediating influence of exercise on the relationship between depression and fatigue This was a prospective, multicenter, observational study involving 15 hospitals across [...] Read more.
This study explored the interconnections between sociodemographic elements, depression, fatigue, and exercise in patients suffering from incurable neoplasm, particularly emphasizing the mediating influence of exercise on the relationship between depression and fatigue This was a prospective, multicenter, observational study involving 15 hospitals across Spain. After three months of systemic cancer treatment, participants completed the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), the Godin-Shephard Leisure-Time Physical Activity Questionnaire (GSLTPAQ) and the Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS) to measure levels of depression, fatigue, and exercise, respectively. A total of 616 subjects participated in this study. Activity levels differed markedly according to educational attainment, marital, and work status. There was a negative correlation between physical activity and depression, and a positive correlation between depression and fatigue (β = −0.18, and β = 0.46, respectively). Additionally, physical activity inversely influenced fatigue levels (β = 0.21). Physical activity served as a partial intermediary in the link between depression and fatigue among patients with advanced, unresectable cancer. Healthcare providers are urged to consider both the physical and emotional dimensions of cancer treatment, implementing physical activity programs to enhance overall patient quality of life and mental health. Full article
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10 pages, 456 KiB  
Article
Discrepancy in the Location of Prostate Cancer Indicated on Biparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pathologically Diagnosed Using Surgical Specimens
by Masayuki Tomioka, Keita Nakane, Makoto Kawase, Koji Iinuma, Daiki Kato, Kota Kawase, Tomoki Taniguchi, Yuki Tobisawa, Fumiya Sugino, Tetsuro Kaga, Hiroki Kato, Masayuki Matsuo, Yusuke Kito, Chiemi Saigo, Natsuko Suzui, Takayasu Ito, Tatsuhiko Miyazaki, Tamotsu Takeuchi and Takuya Koie
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(5), 2846-2855; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31050216 - 16 May 2024
Viewed by 890
Abstract
Accurate diagnosis of the localization of prostate cancer (PCa) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains a challenge. We aimed to assess discrepancy between the location of PCa pathologically diagnosed using surgical specimens and lesions indicated as possible PCa by the Prostate Imaging Reporting [...] Read more.
Accurate diagnosis of the localization of prostate cancer (PCa) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains a challenge. We aimed to assess discrepancy between the location of PCa pathologically diagnosed using surgical specimens and lesions indicated as possible PCa by the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System on MRI. The primary endpoint was the concordance rate between the site of probable clinically significant PCa (csPCa) identified using biparametric MRI (bpMRI) and location of PCa in the surgical specimen obtained using robot-assisted total prostatectomy. Among 85 lesions identified in 30 patients; 42 (49.4%) were identified as possible PCa on MRI. The 85 PCa lesions were divided into positive and negative groups based on the bpMRI results. None of the patients had missed csPCa. Although the diagnostic accuracy of bpMRI was relatively high for PCas located in the middle of the prostate (p = 0.029), it was relatively low for PCa located at the base of the prostate, all of which were csPCas. Although current modalities can accurately diagnose PCa, the possibility that PCa is present with multiple lesions in the prostate should be considered, even if MRI does not detect PCa. Full article
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11 pages, 807 KiB  
Article
Impact of Robotic-Assisted Partial Nephrectomy with Single Layer versus Double Layer Renorrhaphy on Postoperative Renal Function
by Hiroyuki Ito, Keita Nakane, Noriyasu Hagiwara, Makoto Kawase, Daiki Kato, Koji Iinuma, Kenichiro Ishida, Torai Enomoto, Minori Nezasa, Yuki Tobisawa, Takayasu Ito and Takuya Koie
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(5), 2758-2768; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31050209 - 13 May 2024
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Abstract
We aimed to investigate the differences in renal function between patients who underwent single inner-layer renorrhaphy (SILR) or double-layer renorrhaphy (DLR) among those with renal tumors who underwent robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN). This retrospective multicenter cohort study was conducted between November 2018 and [...] Read more.
We aimed to investigate the differences in renal function between patients who underwent single inner-layer renorrhaphy (SILR) or double-layer renorrhaphy (DLR) among those with renal tumors who underwent robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN). This retrospective multicenter cohort study was conducted between November 2018 and October 2023 at two institutions and included patients who underwent RAPN. In total, 93 eligible patients who underwent RAPN were analyzed. Preoperative renal function and prevalence of chronic kidney disease were not significantly different between the two groups. Although urinary leakage was observed in three patients (5.9%) in the SILR group, there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding surgical outcomes (p = 0.249). Serum creatinine levels after RAPN were significantly lower in the SILR group than in the DLR group on postoperative days 1 and 365 following RAPN (p = 0.04). The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was significantly lower in the DLR group than in the SILR group only on postoperative day 1; however, there was no significant difference between the two groups thereafter. Multivariate analysis showed that the method of renorrhaphy was not a predictor for maintaining renal function after RAPN even though it was associated with eGFR on postoperative day 1. Full article
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9 pages, 514 KiB  
Article
Impact of an Inter-Professional Clinic on Pancreatic Cancer Outcomes: A Retrospective Cohort Study
by Gordon Taylor Moffat, Zachary Coyne, Hamzeh Albaba, Kyaw Lwin Aung, Anna Dodd, Osvaldo Espin-Garcia, Shari Moura, Steven Gallinger, John Kim, Adriana Fraser, Shawn Hutchinson, Carol-Anne Moulton, Alice Wei, Ian McGilvray, Neesha Dhani, Raymond Jang, Elena Elimova, Malcolm Moore, Rebecca Prince and Jennifer Knox
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(5), 2589-2597; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31050194 - 2 May 2024
Viewed by 785
Abstract
Background: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) presents significant challenges in diagnosis, staging, and appropriate treatment. Furthermore, patients with PDAC often experience complex symptomatology and psychosocial implications that require multi-disciplinary and inter-professional supportive care management from health professionals. Despite these hurdles, the implementation of inter-professional [...] Read more.
Background: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) presents significant challenges in diagnosis, staging, and appropriate treatment. Furthermore, patients with PDAC often experience complex symptomatology and psychosocial implications that require multi-disciplinary and inter-professional supportive care management from health professionals. Despite these hurdles, the implementation of inter-professional clinic approaches showed promise in enhancing clinical outcomes. To assess the effectiveness of such an approach, we examined the impact of the Wallace McCain Centre for Pancreatic Cancer (WMCPC), an inter-professional clinic for patients with PDAC at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre (PM). Methods: This retrospective cohort study included all patients diagnosed with PDAC who were seen at the PM before (July 2012–June 2014) and after (July 2014–June 2016) the establishment of the WMCPC. Standard therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy remained consistent across both time periods. The cohorts were compared in terms of survival rates, disease stage, referral patterns, time to treatment, symptoms, and the proportion of patients assessed and supported by nursing and allied health professionals. Results: A total of 993 patients were included in the review, comprising 482 patients pre-WMCPC and 511 patients post-WMCPC. In the multivariate analysis, adjusting for ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group) and stage, it was found that post-WMCPC patients experienced longer median overall survival (mOS, HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.72–0.98, p = 0.023). Furthermore, the time from referral to initial consultation date decreased significantly from 13.4 to 8.8 days in the post-WMCPC cohort (p < 0.001), along with a reduction in the time from the first clinic appointment to biopsy (14 vs. 8 days, p = 0.022). Additionally, patient-reported well-being scores showed improvement in the post-WMCPC cohort (p = 0.02), and these patients were more frequently attended to by nursing and allied health professionals (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The implementation of an inter-professional clinic for patients diagnosed with PDAC led to improvements in overall survival, patient-reported well-being, time to initial assessment visit and pathological diagnosis, and symptom management. These findings advocate for the adoption of an inter-professional clinic model in the treatment of patients with PDAC. Full article
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9 pages, 418 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Unsolicited Feedback from Patients with Cancer and Their Families as a Strategy to Improve Cancer Care Delivery
by Parvaneh Fallah, Lucas Clemons, Michelle Bradbury, Lisa Vandermeer, Mark Clemons, Julie Renaud and Marie-France Savard
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(5), 2488-2496; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31050186 - 28 Apr 2024
Viewed by 704
Abstract
Background: Unsolicited patient feedback (compliments and complaints) should allow the healthcare system to address and improve individual and overall patient, family, and staff experiences. We evaluated feedback at a tertiary cancer centre to identify potential areas for optimizing care delivery. Methods: unsolicited feedback [...] Read more.
Background: Unsolicited patient feedback (compliments and complaints) should allow the healthcare system to address and improve individual and overall patient, family, and staff experiences. We evaluated feedback at a tertiary cancer centre to identify potential areas for optimizing care delivery. Methods: unsolicited feedback submitted to the Patient Relations Department, relating to the Divisions of Medical and Radiation Oncology, at the Ottawa Hospital, was analyzed. Results: Of 580 individual reports submitted from 2016 to 2022, patient demographics were available for 97% (563/580). Median patient age was 65 years (range 17–101), and 53% (301/563) were female. The most common cancer types were breast (127/545, 23%) and gastrointestinal (119/545, 22%) malignancies, and most (64%, 311/486) patients had metastatic disease. Feedback was submitted mainly by patients (291/579, 50%), and predominantly negative (489/569, 86%). The main reasons for complaints included: communication (29%, 162/566) and attitude/conduct of care (28%, 159/566). While feedback rates were initially stable, an increase occurred from 2019 to 2021. Conclusions: Unsolicited feedback remains mostly negative, and relates to physician communication. If we are to drive meaningful changes in care delivery, more standardized means of assessing feedback and implementation strategies are needed. In addition, in an era of increased healthcare provider burnout, strategies to enhance formal positive feedback are also warranted. Full article
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22 pages, 1238 KiB  
Article
PC-PEP, a Comprehensive Daily Six-Month Home-Based Patient Empowerment Program Leads to Weight Loss in Men with Prostate Cancer: A Secondary Analysis of a Clinical Trial
by Wyatt MacNevin, Gabriela Ilie, Ricardo Rendon, Ross Mason, Jesse Spooner, Emily Chedrawe, Nikhilesh Patil, David Bowes, Greg Bailly, David Bell, Derek Wilke, Jeffery B. L. Zahavich, Cody MacDonald and Robert David Harold Rutledge
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(3), 1667-1688; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31030127 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1184
Abstract
Background: The Prostate Cancer—Patient Empowerment Program (PC-PEP) is a six-month daily home-based program shown to improve mental health and urinary function. This secondary analysis explores weight loss in male PC-PEP participants. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial with 128 men undergoing curative prostate [...] Read more.
Background: The Prostate Cancer—Patient Empowerment Program (PC-PEP) is a six-month daily home-based program shown to improve mental health and urinary function. This secondary analysis explores weight loss in male PC-PEP participants. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial with 128 men undergoing curative prostate cancer (PC) treatment, 66 received ‘early’ PC-PEP, while 62 were assigned to the ‘late’ waitlist-control group, receiving 6 months of standard-of-care treatment followed by 6 months of PC-PEP. PC-PEP comprised 182 daily emails with video-based exercise and dietary (predominantly plant-based) education, live online events, and 30 min strength training routines (using body weight and elastic bands). Weight and height data were collected via online surveys (baseline, 6 months, and 12 months) including medical chart reviews. Adherence was tracked weekly. Results: No attrition or adverse events were reported. At 6 months, the early PC-PEP group experienced significant weight loss, averaging 2.7 kg (p < 0.001) compared to the waitlist-control group. Weight loss was noted in the late intervention group of PC-PEP, albeit less pronounced than in the early group. Early PC-PEP surgery patients lost on average 1.4 kg (SE = 0.65) from the trial’s start to surgery day. High adherence to exercise and dietary recommendations was noted. Conclusions: PC-PEP led to significant weight loss in men undergoing curative prostate cancer treatment compared to standard-of-care. Full article
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Review

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16 pages, 325 KiB  
Review
Epstein–Barr Virus Monitoring after an Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: Review of the Recent Data and Current Practices in Canada
by Claire Ratiu, Simon F. Dufresne, Stéphanie Thiant and Jean Roy
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(5), 2780-2795; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31050211 - 14 May 2024
Viewed by 645
Abstract
Epstein–Barr virus-related post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV-PTLD) is a serious complication following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). A pre-emptive strategy using rituximab, which aims to manage patients early at the time of EBV reactivation to avoid PTLD, has been recommended by the most recent [...] Read more.
Epstein–Barr virus-related post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV-PTLD) is a serious complication following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). A pre-emptive strategy using rituximab, which aims to manage patients early at the time of EBV reactivation to avoid PTLD, has been recommended by the most recent ECIL-6 guidelines in 2016. However, there is still a great heterogeneity of viral-load monitoring protocols, targeted patient populations, and pre-emptive treatment characteristics between centers, making precise EBV monitoring recommendations difficult. We conducted a literature review from the most recent publications between 1 January 2015 and 1 August 2023, to summarize the emerging data on EBV-PTLD prevention strategies in HSCT recipients, including the EBV-DNA threshold and use of rituximab. We also present the results of a survey of current practices carried out in 12 of the main HSCT centers across Canada. We confirm that pre-emptive rituximab remains an efficient strategy for EBV-PTLD prevention. However, there is an urgent need to perform prospective, randomized, multicentric trials with larger numbers of patients reflecting current practices to determine the best clinical conduct with regards to rituximab dosing, timing of treatment, and criteria to initiate treatments. Longer follow-ups will also be necessary to assess patients’ long-term outcomes. Full article
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