Special Issue "Cosmetics: Feature Papers"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Enzo Berardesca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33136, USA
Interests: dermatology; skin care; contact dermatitis; cosmetic efficacy; cosmetic formulation; barrier function; skin irritation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is open to receive high-quality papers in open access format on invitation from the Editorial Board members, or those invited by the editorial office and the Editor-in-Chief. Both original research articles and comprehensive review papers are welcome. The papers will be published, free of charge, in open access after peer-review.

Prof. Dr. Enzo Berardesca
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Article
Evaluation of the Filming and Protective Properties of a New Trehalose and Ceramides Based Ingredient
Cosmetics 2019, 6(4), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics6040062 - 25 Oct 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3675
Abstract
The aim of this study is showing the filming and skin barrier protective properties of a new ingredient based on ceramides and trehalose and carried in lipophilic vesicles composed of lecithin and cholesterol (or phytosterols). Through an in vivo study, the restructuring and [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is showing the filming and skin barrier protective properties of a new ingredient based on ceramides and trehalose and carried in lipophilic vesicles composed of lecithin and cholesterol (or phytosterols). Through an in vivo study, the restructuring and hydrating properties of this trehalose and ceramides compound have been evaluated. Furthermore, this new ingredient has been used in a topical formulation for atopic dermatitis, proving to be effective in the alterations of skin barrier. This evidence makes it an interesting ingredient for topical dermatological compositions in the treatment of dermatitis and all manifestations correlated to these skin disorders, such as edema, swelling, rash, redness, and itching. Its soothing and protective action against the painful and annoying symptoms like those given by dermatitis makes this trehalose and ceramides based ingredient for topical use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics: Feature Papers)
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Article
In Vivo Skin Characterizations by Using Opto-Thermal Depth-Resolved Detection Spectra
Cosmetics 2019, 6(3), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics6030054 - 14 Sep 2019
Viewed by 3157
Abstract
OTTER (opto-thermal transient emission radiometry) is an infrared remote sensing technology that has been extensively used in skin measurements. It is non-contact, non-invasive, and has a unique depth profiling capability. By selecting different detection wavelengths, OTTER can be used for different types of [...] Read more.
OTTER (opto-thermal transient emission radiometry) is an infrared remote sensing technology that has been extensively used in skin measurements. It is non-contact, non-invasive, and has a unique depth profiling capability. By selecting different detection wavelengths, OTTER can be used for different types of skin measurements, such as skin hydration measurements and skin topically applied substance measurements, etc. By plotting the results at different detection wavelengths, we can have an opto-thermal detection spectrum. Combining with OTTER’s unique depth profiling capability, we can get a depth-resolved opto-thermal detection spectrum. This is a powerful tool that can be used for many skin studies. Here we will present our latest study with details on the apparatus setup, theoretical background, as well as experimental results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics: Feature Papers)
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Article
The Beneficial Regulation of Extracellular Matrix and Heat Shock Proteins, and the Inhibition of Cellular Oxidative Stress Effects and Inflammatory Cytokines by 1α, 25 dihydroxyvitaminD3 in Non-Irradiated and Ultraviolet Radiated Dermal Fibroblasts
Cosmetics 2019, 6(3), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics6030046 - 01 Aug 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3634
Abstract
Intrinsic skin aging and photoaging, from exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, are associated with altered regulation of genes associated with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and inflammation, as well as cellular damage from oxidative stress. The regulatory properties of 1α, 25dihydroxyvitamin D3 (vitamin D) [...] Read more.
Intrinsic skin aging and photoaging, from exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, are associated with altered regulation of genes associated with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and inflammation, as well as cellular damage from oxidative stress. The regulatory properties of 1α, 25dihydroxyvitamin D3 (vitamin D) include endocrine, ECM regulation, cell differentiation, photoprotection, and anti-inflammation. The goal of this research was to identify the beneficial effects of vitamin D in preventing intrinsic skin aging and photoaging, through its direct effects as well as its effects on the ECM, associated heat shock proteins (HSP-47, and -70), cellular oxidative stress effects, and inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-8] in non-irradiated, UVA-radiated, UVB-radiated dermal fibroblasts. With regard to the ECM, vitamin D stimulated type I collagen and inhibited cellular elastase activity in non-irradiated fibroblasts; and stimulated type I collagen and HSP-47, and inhibited elastin expression and elastase activity in UVA-radiated dermal fibroblasts. With regard to cellular protection, vitamin D inhibited oxidative damage to DNA, RNA, and lipids in non-irradiated, UVA-radiated and UVB-radiated fibroblasts, and, in addition, increased cell viability of UVB-radiated cells. With regard to anti-inflammation, vitamin D inhibited expression of Il-1 and IL-8 in UVA-radiated fibroblasts, and stimulated HSP-70 in UVA-radiated and UVB-radiated fibroblasts. Overall, vitamin D is predominantly beneficial in preventing UVA-radiation induced photoaging through the differential regulation of the ECM, HSPs, and inflammatory cytokines, and protective effects on the cellular biomolecules. It is also beneficial in preventing UVB-radiation associated photoaging through the stimulation of cell viability and HSP-70, and the inhibition of cellular oxidative damage, and in preventing intrinsic aging through the stimulation of type I collagen and inhibition of cellular oxidative damage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics: Feature Papers)
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Article
Evaluation of the Soothing and Protective Properties of a Lignin Hydrolyzate
Cosmetics 2019, 6(3), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics6030038 - 03 Jul 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3918
Abstract
Lignins have shown remarkable antioxidant properties; acting as “scavengers” of free radicals physiologically produced by cell metabolisms; and exerting a protective action caused by the strong ability of these molecules to absorb UV radiation. Through preliminary Molecular Modeling studies and experimental studies in [...] Read more.
Lignins have shown remarkable antioxidant properties; acting as “scavengers” of free radicals physiologically produced by cell metabolisms; and exerting a protective action caused by the strong ability of these molecules to absorb UV radiation. Through preliminary Molecular Modeling studies and experimental studies in vivo and in vitro, a lignin hydrolysate compound has been shown to be an extremely versatile active ingredient, presenting soothing, anti-inflammatory, anti-itch, anti-oxidant, anti-aging and anti-pollution properties. The possible fields of application are therefore multiple; making this lignin hydrolysate a particularly interesting ingredient for topical dermatological compositions in the treatment of various skin disorders such as inflammation, edema, swelling, rash, redness, itching, chrono- and photo-induced skin aging. These manifestations are also the basis of more or less serious skin problems, making lignin hydrolysate capable of being used in cosmetic products for the eternal challenge of fighting skin aging, but also in medical devices that can be used to fight more painful and annoying symptoms, like those caused by dermatitis or psoriasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics: Feature Papers)
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Article
Analysis of Heavy Metal Content in Conventional and Herbal Toothpastes Available at Maltese Pharmacies
Cosmetics 2019, 6(2), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics6020028 - 03 May 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 5020
Abstract
Although toothpastes are considered as topical cosmetics that are not normally ingested, it is evident that they may contribute to the introduction of heavy metals and xenobiotics through buccal and gastrointestinal absorption. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential presence [...] Read more.
Although toothpastes are considered as topical cosmetics that are not normally ingested, it is evident that they may contribute to the introduction of heavy metals and xenobiotics through buccal and gastrointestinal absorption. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential presence of metals and polyphenols in conventional, children’s and herbal toothpastes. Metal analysis was conducted by using the Microwave Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometer and the total polyphenolic content was determined by using the Folin–Ciocalteu test. Results showed that cadmium and mercury were absent in all toothpastes while zinc and tin exhibited high values. This was because the latter two metals are incorporated as part of the ingredients. In the case of polyphenols, the highest value was obtained in one of the samples from the children’s toothpaste category while the lowest value was obtained from the conventional toothpaste category. Lead and nickel were two other metals that fell outside the limits for EU and US standards. Most of these limits are usually applicable to topical cosmetic products or food products. However, these may not adequately cover oral hygiene products, such as toothpastes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics: Feature Papers)
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Review

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Review
Halal Cosmetics: A Review on Ingredients, Production, and Testing Methods
Cosmetics 2019, 6(3), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics6030037 - 01 Jul 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 9495
Abstract
The demand for halal cosmetic products among the 2.4 billion Muslim consumers worldwide is increasing. However, the demand for halal cosmetics remains unmet because cosmetics production is dominated by non-halal cosmetic manufacturers, whose production methods may not conform with the requirements of halal [...] Read more.
The demand for halal cosmetic products among the 2.4 billion Muslim consumers worldwide is increasing. However, the demand for halal cosmetics remains unmet because cosmetics production is dominated by non-halal cosmetic manufacturers, whose production methods may not conform with the requirements of halal science. The development of halal cosmetics and the assessment of their product performance is still in its infancy. The integration of halal science in the manufacture of most cosmetic products remains inadequate. Moreover, there is a global dearth of guiding documents on the development and assessment techniques in the production of comprehensively halal cosmetics. This paper aims to abridge existing literature and knowledge of halal and cosmetic science in order to provide essential technical guidance in the manufacture of halal cosmetics. In addition, the adoption of these methods addresses the unique ethical issues associated with conformance of cosmetics’ product performance to religious practices and halal science. It highlights the applicability of established methods in skin science in the assessment of halal cosmetics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics: Feature Papers)

Other

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Commentary
The Influence of Facial Muscle Training on the Facial Soft Tissue Profile: A Brief Review
Cosmetics 2019, 6(3), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics6030050 - 11 Aug 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 6527
Abstract
In this review, we summarize recent literature investigating facial-exercise-induced changes in facial soft tissue. A literature search was performed in PubMed for the terms facial exercise, rejuvenation, muscle, skin, and aging. Four studies were identified from the search and were subject to further [...] Read more.
In this review, we summarize recent literature investigating facial-exercise-induced changes in facial soft tissue. A literature search was performed in PubMed for the terms facial exercise, rejuvenation, muscle, skin, and aging. Four studies were identified from the search and were subject to further assessment. Four studies were included in our analysis. Two of the four studies included compared the experimental (training) group to a control group. The other two studies had no control group. The participants were mainly middle-aged women. Training conditions varied; neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) was used in two studies, the other two studies used an oscillatory movement device and voluntary facial isometric exercise. Two studies measured facial muscle size using ultrasonography before and after 12 weeks of NMES or 8 weeks of oscillatory movement of the face. One study assessed the changes in facial skin elasticity in a single group following 8 weeks of facial isometric exercise, while one study measured strength of labial and lingual muscles before and following 4 weeks of NMES. We found two studies that reported facial-exercise-induced increases in facial muscle size in middle-aged women. It was also reported that facial skin function may improve following facial isometric exercise. Future research is needed to clarify how these changes link with facial rejuvenation. Compared to extremity muscles, the facial muscles are small in size, their shapes are complex, and the boundaries with other tissues may be unclear. Future study is also necessary to examine the reliability of measurements of the facial muscles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics: Feature Papers)
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