Special Issue "Feature Papers in Cosmetics in 2021"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Enzo Berardesca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33136, USA
Interests: dermatology; skin care; contact dermatitis; cosmetic efficacy; cosmetic formulation; barrier function; skin irritation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As Editor-in-Chief of Cosmetics, I am pleased to announce this Special Issue entitled “Feature Papers in Cosmetics in 2021”. This Special Issue will be a collection of high-quality papers from editorial board members, guest editors, and leading researchers invited by the editorial office and the Editor-in-Chief. Both original research articles and comprehensive review papers are welcome.

Dr. Enzo Berardesca
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • materials and ingredient research related to cosmetics
  • therapeutic options for skin, hair and body care
  • product formulations and ingredients
  • cosmetic olfactory research developments
  • technologies in cosmetic product development
  • testing of skin and hair products
  • toxicological studies of cosmetic products
  • in vivo and in vitro testing of cosmetic products
  • pure and applied research involved in skin, hair and body cosmetics
  • analytical chemistry of essential components involved in cosmetic product formulations
  • biomedicine research on biologically active components
  • regulatory and ethical issues in cosmetic research
  • dermatology, microbiology, anatomy, physiology, immunology and biochemistry of the skin
  • facial rejuvenation, laser therapy
  • cosmetic surgery and related medicine techniques

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Potent Tyrosinase Inhibitory Activity of Curcuminoid Analogues and Inhibition Kinetics Studies
Cosmetics 2021, 8(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8020035 - 04 May 2021
Viewed by 293
Abstract
Natural tyrosinase inhibitors from herbal plants are promising therapeutic agents for skincare and cosmetic products. Natural curcuminoids exhibit weak antityrosinase properties. The structural modification of curcumin, the major curcuminoid from Curcuma longa, gave 14 analogues. The tyrosinase inhibitory activity of the natural [...] Read more.
Natural tyrosinase inhibitors from herbal plants are promising therapeutic agents for skincare and cosmetic products. Natural curcuminoids exhibit weak antityrosinase properties. The structural modification of curcumin, the major curcuminoid from Curcuma longa, gave 14 analogues. The tyrosinase inhibitory activity of the natural curcuminoids and the modified analogues on both L-tyrosine and DOPA substrates were evaluated. The inhibition kinetics were also undertaken. For analogues with potent activity on the L-tyrosine substrate, the isoxazole analogue 12 and two reduced analogues, hexahydrocurcumin (16) and the α,β-unsaturated analogue 17, showed IC50 values of 8.3, 14.6 and 9.4 µM, and were 20.9-, 11.9- and 18.4-fold more active, respectively, than kojic acid, the reference compound. For the analogues with potent antityrosinase on DOPA substrate, the dimethylated analogue 5 exhibited the strongest antityrosinase activity against the DOPA substrate, with the IC50 value of 8.0 µM, which was 16.6-fold more active than kojic acid. The inhibition kinetics revealed that curcuminoid 5 could bind with both free enzyme and with the enzyme–substrate complex. It acted as a competitive–uncompetitive mixed-II type inhibitor. Curcuminoid 17 could bind with both free enzyme and the enzyme–substrate complex. The results indicated that 17 acted as a competitive–uncompetitive mixed-I type inhibitor, while curcuminoid 12 was a noncompetitive inhibitor which bound with both free enzymes and the enzyme–substrate complex. These potent analogues might serve as new potential tyrosinase inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of skin pigmentation disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Cosmetics in 2021)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Calendula officinalis L. Flower Extract
Cosmetics 2021, 8(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8020031 - 25 Apr 2021
Viewed by 645
Abstract
The use of calendula for its lenitive properties’ dates to the XII century. This plant contains several bioactive compounds, including terpenoids, terpenes, carotenoids, flavonoids and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Calendula flower extract is used in soothing cosmetics, such as after-sun, sensitive skin and eye [...] Read more.
The use of calendula for its lenitive properties’ dates to the XII century. This plant contains several bioactive compounds, including terpenoids, terpenes, carotenoids, flavonoids and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Calendula flower extract is used in soothing cosmetics, such as after-sun, sensitive skin and eye contour products. The anti-inflammatory properties of this ingredient were demonstrated in an animal model, but the mechanism of action is poorly understood. Therefore, our work explored the effect of a calendula flower extract on NO production, a pro-inflammatory radical produced by nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and highly released by innate immune cells in inflammatory-related pathologies. NO production was evoked by the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in macrophages, using concentrations that did not compromise cells viability. This ingredient exhibited a dose-dependent NO inhibition, reaching 50% at 147 μL/mL without cytotoxicity. Together with previous literature, these results provide experimental evidence on the anti-inflammatory properties of calendula flower extract, as well as its usefulness in cosmetics with soothing properties and adjunctive skin care in the treatment of the diseases associated with dysregulation of the NO signaling cascade. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Cosmetics in 2021)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Fingerprint of Nature—Skin Penetration Analysis of a Stinging Nettle PlantCrystals Formulation
Cosmetics 2021, 8(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8010021 - 10 Mar 2021
Viewed by 788
Abstract
Background: PlantCrystals are a new concept to produce plant-based formulations. Their principle is based on the diminution of parts of or whole plants. In this study, the effect of a surfactant on stinging nettle leaf PlantCrystals was investigated. Secondly, the contents of bulk [...] Read more.
Background: PlantCrystals are a new concept to produce plant-based formulations. Their principle is based on the diminution of parts of or whole plants. In this study, the effect of a surfactant on stinging nettle leaf PlantCrystals was investigated. Secondly, the contents of bulk material and the PlantCrystals formulation were compared. In addition, for the very first time, the skin penetration of PlantCrystals was investigated. Methods: Stinging nettle leaves were milled with high-pressure homogenization. Sizes were analyzed via light microscopy and static light scattering. To investigate the effect of the milling, the flavonoid and total carotenoid content were determined, and the antioxidant capacity of the formulation was measured via total polyphenol content and DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) assay. Finally, the impact on skin penetration was investigated. Results: Size analysis showed a stabilizing effect of the surfactant, and the chemical analysis revealed higher flavonoid and polyphenol contents for PlantCrystals. The penetration of the formulation into the stratum corneum was shown to be promising; PlantCrystals possessed a visually perceived higher fluorescence and homogeneity compared to the bulk material. Conclusion: The concept of PlantCrystals improved the availability of valuable constituents and the penetration efficacy. The utilization of the natural chlorophyll fluorescence for skin penetration analysis of plant-based formulations proved itself highly effective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Cosmetics in 2021)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop