Special Issue "Ovarian Cancer Metastasis"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Hilary A. Kenny

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Section of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: several keywords to reveal your research interests, ovarian cancer, tumor microenvironment, metastasis, mesothelial cells, 3D organotypic models, high-throughput screening
Guest Editor
Dr. Sumegha Mitra

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), C547 Joseph E. Walther Hall (R3), 980 W Walnut Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ovarian cancer, HGSOC, mutant p53, epigenetics, ubiquitination, ubiquitin proteasome system, cell signaling, chemo-resistance
Guest Editor
Dr. Katherine Fuh

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Washington University, 425 So. Euclid Ave Box 8064 St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: metastasis, chemoresistance, receptor tyrosine kinase, targeted therapy, tumor microenvironment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleauges,

This Special Issue will focus on ovarian cancer metastasis. I would like to invite leaders in the field to discuss the role of specific tumor microenvionment components in the process of ovarian cancer metastasis with a focus on chemoresistance, treatment and detection. Secondly, I would like to invite leaders in field to discuss key processes involved in ovarian cancer metastasis with a focus on chemoresistance, treatment and detection. Authors should discuss the latest technological advances in these studies and compare findings to other cancers. In addition, I would like to ask the experts in field to submit review articles of high interest regarding ovarian cancer metastasis.

Dr. Hilary A. Kenny
Dr. Sumegha Mitra
Dr. Katherine Fuh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ECMs - collagens, fibronectin, vitronectin, laminin
  • mesothelial cells
  • CAFs
  • macrophages
  • neutrophils
  • B cells
  • NK cells
  • TILs
  • T cells
  • adipocytes
  • endothelial cells/angiogenesis
  • cancer cells in circulation - ascites/spheroids
  • early metastasis
  • late metastasis
  • recurrent metastases
  • ovarian cancer stem cells

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Paclitaxel-Induced Src Activation Is Inhibited by Dasatinib Treatment, Independently of Cancer Stem Cell Properties, in a Mouse Model of Ovarian Cancer
Cancers 2019, 11(2), 243; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11020243
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 12 February 2019 / Accepted: 14 February 2019 / Published: 19 February 2019
PDF Full-text (7926 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Approximately seventy percent of ovarian cancer patients succumb to the disease within the first 5 years of diagnosis, even after successful surgery and effective chemotherapy treatment. A small subset of chemotherapy resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) cause relapse of ovarian cancers. This study [...] Read more.
Approximately seventy percent of ovarian cancer patients succumb to the disease within the first 5 years of diagnosis, even after successful surgery and effective chemotherapy treatment. A small subset of chemotherapy resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) cause relapse of ovarian cancers. This study investigated the association between paclitaxel-mediated Src activation (p-Src) and CSC populations in driving ovarian cancer progression. We demonstrate that patients with high-stage serous ovarian carcinomas have significantly elevated levels of p-Src, compared to patient with low-stage and benign ovarian tumours. Additionally, p-Src was significantly enhanced in ascites-derived tumour cells obtained from recurrent patients, compared to chemonaïve patients. Paclitaxel treatment increased Src activation in ovarian cancer cells, causing enrichment of CSC marker expression in the surviving cells in vitro and in xenografts of nude mice. Dasatinib in combination with paclitaxel significantly suppressed p-Src in ovarian cancer cell lines and xenografts but had no effect on the expression of CSC markers. However, combination of paclitaxel and Dasatinib showed lower trend in invasion in liver and pancreas, compared to paclitaxel-only treatment. The tumours treated with combination therapy also had significantly lower infiltration of mononuclear cells. Robust recurrent tumour growth was observed in all mice groups after termination of treatments. The above results suggest that Dasatinib-mediated inhibition of p-Src may not be crucial for paclitaxel-induced CSC-mediated recurrence in ovarian cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ovarian Cancer Metastasis)
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