Special Issue "Advances in Adult and Pediatric Brain Tumor Management"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Zulma Tovar-Spinoza
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neurosurgery and Pediatrics, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York, NY, USA
Interests: pediatric brain tumors; epilepsy surgery; laser ablation; minimally invasive surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am writing you as the Guest Editor of a Special Issue on “Advances in Adult and Pediatric Brain Tumor Management”, to be publish at the open access journal Brain Sciences (ISSN 2976-3425-indexed in PubMed, Scopus and ESCI-Web of Science) https://www.mdpi.com/journal/brainsci.

We would like to invite you to contribute with a manuscript from your area of expertise. Although we will do everything we can to accommodate your needs, the expected deadline for receipt of the manuscript is 15 August 2017.

We would be grateful if you would let us know if you are able to participate in this Special Issue of “Advances in Adult and Pediatric Brain Tumor Management”.

We are looking forward to hearing back from you.

Dr. Zulma Tovar-Spinoza
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • brain tumor
  • treatment
  • surgery
  • new technology

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Extent of Resection in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma: Impact of a Specialized Neuro-Oncology Care Center
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8010005 - 25 Dec 2017
Cited by 9
Abstract
Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) consists of microsurgical resection followed by concomitant radiochemotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. The best outcome regarding progression free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) is achieved by maximal resection. The foundation of a specialized neuro-oncology care center (NOC) has enabled the [...] Read more.
Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) consists of microsurgical resection followed by concomitant radiochemotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. The best outcome regarding progression free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) is achieved by maximal resection. The foundation of a specialized neuro-oncology care center (NOC) has enabled the implementation of a large technical portfolio including functional imaging, awake craniotomy, PET scanning, fluorescence-guided resection, and integrated postsurgical therapy. This study analyzed whether the technically improved neurosurgical treatment structure yields a higher rate of complete resection, thus ultimately improving patient outcome. Patients and methods: The study included 149 patients treated surgically for newly diagnosed GBM. The neurological performance score (NPS) and the Karnofsky performance score (KPS) were measured before and after resection. The extent of resection (EOR) was volumetrically quantified. Patients were stratified into two subcohorts: treated before (A) and after (B) the foundation of the Regensburg NOC. The EOR and the PFS and OS were evaluated. Results: Prognostic factors for PFS and OS were age, preoperative KPS, O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation status and EOR. Patients with volumetrically defined complete resection had significantly better PFS (9.4 vs. 7.8 months; p = 0.042) and OS (18.4 vs. 14.5 months; p = 0.005) than patients with incomplete resection. The frequency of transient or permanent postoperative neurological deficits was not higher after complete resection in both subcohorts. The frequency of complete resection was significantly higher in subcohort B than in subcohort A (68.2% vs. 34.8%; p = 0.007). Accordingly, subcohort B showed significantly longer PFS (8.6 vs. 7.5 months; p = 0.010) and OS (18.7 vs. 12.4 months; p = 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed complete resection, age, preoperative KPS, and MGMT promoter status as independent prognostic factors for PFS and OS. Our data show a higher frequency of complete resection in patients with GBM after the establishment of a series of technical developments that resulted in significantly better PFS and OS without increasing surgery-related morbidity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Adult and Pediatric Brain Tumor Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication
4SC-202 as a Potential Treatment for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Medulloblastoma
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(11), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7110147 - 03 Nov 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
This project involves an examination of the effect of the small molecule inhibitor 4SC-202 on the growth of the pediatric brain cancer medulloblastoma. The small molecule inhibitor 4SC-202 significantly inhibits the viability of the pediatric desmoplastic cerebellar human medulloblastoma cell line DAOY, with [...] Read more.
This project involves an examination of the effect of the small molecule inhibitor 4SC-202 on the growth of the pediatric brain cancer medulloblastoma. The small molecule inhibitor 4SC-202 significantly inhibits the viability of the pediatric desmoplastic cerebellar human medulloblastoma cell line DAOY, with an IC50 = 58.1 nM, but does not affect the viability of noncancerous neural stem cells (NSC). 4SC-202 exposure inhibits hedgehog expression in the DAOY cell line. Furthermore, microarray analysis of human medulloblastoma patient tumors indicate significant upregulation of key targets in the Hedgehog signaling pathway and Protein Tyrosine Kinase (PTK7). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Adult and Pediatric Brain Tumor Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Glioblastoma under Siege: An Overview of Current Therapeutic Strategies
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8010015 - 16 Jan 2018
Cited by 27
Abstract
Glioblastoma is known to be one of the most lethal and untreatable human tumors. Surgery and radiotherapy in combination with classical alkylating agents such as temozolomide offer little hope to escape a poor prognosis. For these reasons, enormous efforts are currently devoted to [...] Read more.
Glioblastoma is known to be one of the most lethal and untreatable human tumors. Surgery and radiotherapy in combination with classical alkylating agents such as temozolomide offer little hope to escape a poor prognosis. For these reasons, enormous efforts are currently devoted to refine in vivo and in vitro models with the specific goal of finding new molecular aberrant pathways, suitable to be targeted by a variety of therapeutic approaches, including novel pharmaceutical formulations and immunotherapy strategies. In this review, we will first discuss current molecular classification based on genomic and transcriptomic criteria. Also, the state of the art in current clinical practice for glioblastoma therapy in the light of the recent molecular classification, together with ongoing phases II and III clinical trials, will be described. Finally, new pharmaceutical formulations such as nanoparticles and viral vectors, together with new strategies entailing the use of monoclonal antibodies, vaccines and immunotherapy agents, such as checkpoint inhibitors, will also be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Adult and Pediatric Brain Tumor Management)
Open AccessReview
Advances in Brain Tumor Surgery for Glioblastoma in Adults
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(12), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7120166 - 20 Dec 2017
Cited by 35
Abstract
Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary intracranial neoplasia, and is characterized by its extremely poor prognosis. Despite maximum surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation, the histological heterogeneity of GBM makes total eradication impossible, due to residual cancer cells invading the parenchyma, which is not [...] Read more.
Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary intracranial neoplasia, and is characterized by its extremely poor prognosis. Despite maximum surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation, the histological heterogeneity of GBM makes total eradication impossible, due to residual cancer cells invading the parenchyma, which is not otherwise seen in radiographic images. Even with gross total resection, the heterogeneity and the dormant nature of brain tumor initiating cells allow for therapeutic evasion, contributing to its recurrence and malignant progression, and severely impacting survival. Visual delimitation of the tumor’s margins with common surgical techniques is a challenge faced by many surgeons. In an attempt to achieve optimal safe resection, advances in approaches allowing intraoperative analysis of cancer and non-cancer tissue have been developed and applied in humans resulting in improved outcomes. In addition, functional paradigms based on stimulation techniques to map the brain’s electrical activity have optimized glioma resection in eloquent areas such as the Broca’s, Wernike’s and perirolandic areas. In this review, we will elaborate on the current standard therapy for newly diagnosed and recurrent glioblastoma with a focus on surgical approaches. We will describe current technologies used for glioma resection, such as awake craniotomy, fluorescence guided surgery, laser interstitial thermal therapy and intraoperative mass spectrometry. Additionally, we will describe a newly developed tool that has shown promising results in preclinical experiments for brain cancer: optical coherence tomography. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Adult and Pediatric Brain Tumor Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Immunotherapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(10), 137; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7100137 - 21 Oct 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
Malignant brain tumors are the most common cause of solid cancer death in children. New targeted therapies are vital to improve treatment outcomes, but must be developed to enable trafficking across the blood brain barrier (BBB). Since activated T cells cross the BBB, [...] Read more.
Malignant brain tumors are the most common cause of solid cancer death in children. New targeted therapies are vital to improve treatment outcomes, but must be developed to enable trafficking across the blood brain barrier (BBB). Since activated T cells cross the BBB, cancer immunotherapy can be harnessed to unlock the cytotoxic potential of the immune system. However, standard of care treatments (i.e., chemotherapy and radiation) applied concomitant to pediatric brain tumor immunotherapy may abrogate induction of immunotherapeutic responses. This review will discuss the development of immunotherapies within this paradigm using emerging approaches being investigated in phase I/II trials in children with refractory brain tumors, including checkpoint inhibitors, vaccine immunotherapy, and adoptive cell therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Adult and Pediatric Brain Tumor Management)
Open AccessReview
Changes in Cognition and Decision Making Capacity Following Brain Tumour Resection: Illustrated with Two Cases
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(10), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7100122 - 24 Sep 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
Changes in cognition, behaviour and emotion frequently occur in patients with primary and secondary brain tumours. This impacts the ability to make considered decisions, especially following surgical resection, which is often overlooked in the management of patients. Moreover, the impact of cognitive deficits [...] Read more.
Changes in cognition, behaviour and emotion frequently occur in patients with primary and secondary brain tumours. This impacts the ability to make considered decisions, especially following surgical resection, which is often overlooked in the management of patients. Moreover, the impact of cognitive deficits on decision making ability affects activities of daily living and functional independence. The assessment process to ascertain decision making capacity remains a matter of debate. One avenue for evaluating a patient’s ability to make informed decisions in the context of brain tumour resection is neuropsychological assessment. This involves the assessment of a wide range of cognitive abilities on standard measurement tools, providing a robust approach to ascertaining capacity. Evidence has shown that a comprehensive and tailored neuropsychological assessment has greater sensitivity than brief cognitive screening tools to detect subtle and/or specific cognitive deficits in brain tumours. It is the precise nature and severity of any cognitive deficits that determines any implications for decision making capacity. This paper focuses on cognitive deficits and decision making capacity following surgical resection of both benign and malignant, and primary and secondary brain tumours in adult patients, and the implications for patients’ ability to consent to future medical treatment and make decisions related to everyday activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Adult and Pediatric Brain Tumor Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop