Special Issue "United in the Prevention of Bacterial Resistance during the COVID-19 Era"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2022 | Viewed by 385

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Egidia Gabriela Miftode
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Infectious Diseases (Internal Medicine II), Faculty of Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Gr. T. Popa”, 700115 Iasi, Romania
Interests: systemic infections; antibiotic resistance; CNS infections; viral hepatitis
Prof. Dr. Gabriel Adrian Popescu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Carol Davila” Bucharest, 050474 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: antibiotic resistance; severe infections; rare infections
Dr. Simin-Aysel Florescu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Department of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Carol Davila” Bucharest, 050474 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: antibiotic resistance and new therapies; sepsis; emergent diseases; tropical imported diseases
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is inducing an increasingly significant burden on public health, this issue becoming even more pronounced in the context of COVID-19 pandemic. The infection with SARS-CoV 2, until recently an absolutely unknown element in the landscape of infectious pathology, created from the very beginning the premises of fear both in general population and among healthcare personnel, an aspect which led to a further attitude of overprotection. Subsequently, a systematic, early, and often non-judicious administration of antibiotics has been observed, even in the absence of any data attesting to a co-infection. An eventual later development of a true superinfection often necessitated therapy escalation or an extension of the administration period of the initial antibiotic regimen.

Last, but not least, it is worrisome that the dramatic increase in misuse or overuse of reserve antibiotics, with difficult to quantify consequences concerning the resistance patterns of certain germs or the mortality rates associated with these infections.

The main purpose of this Special Issue is to provide an appropriate background for sharing with us your experience gained during the COVID-19 pandemic period, so that the data provided could enhance the therapeutic management and optimize the antibiotic regimens in all services where infectious pathologies are a constant of daily clinical practice. Therefore, original research and reviews from interdisciplinary areas focusing on antibiotic therapy and antibiotic resistance related to COVID-19 will be of great interest.

Prof. Dr. Egidia Gabriela Miftode
Prof. Dr. Gabriel Adrian Popescu
Dr. Simin-Aysel Florescu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Coronavirus disease 2019
  • COVID-19
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • antimicrobial treatment
  • antimicrobial development
  • superinfections

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Changes in Use of Blood Cultures in a COVID-19-Dedicated Tertiary Hospital
Antibiotics 2022, 11(12), 1694; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11121694 - 24 Nov 2022
Viewed by 135
Abstract
Blood cultures should be collected within an hour in the setting of sepsis/septic shock. The contamination rate should be below 3%. Worldwide reports have described an increase in blood contamination rates during the COVID-19 pandemic. We performed a retrospective analysis of the blood [...] Read more.
Blood cultures should be collected within an hour in the setting of sepsis/septic shock. The contamination rate should be below 3%. Worldwide reports have described an increase in blood contamination rates during the COVID-19 pandemic. We performed a retrospective analysis of the blood cultures collected during a 10-month period (March–December 2020) at NIID “Prof. Dr. Matei Balș”. The results were compared with data from the pre-pandemic period (March–December 2016) and with the existing data in the literature. During the pandemic, there was a significant decrease in the number of blood cultures collected (1274 blood cultures in 2020 vs. 5399 in 2016). The contamination rate was higher in 2020 (11.7%) compared to 2016 (8.2%), p < 0.001. The rate of infectious episodes in which the etiological agent was identified was constant: 11% in 2020 versus 11.9% in 2016, p = 0.479, but there were fewer invasive bacterial/fungal infections: 0.95/1000 patient days in 2020 vs. 2.39/1000 patient days in 2016, p < 0.001. We observed a change in the species distribution. The Gram-negative isolate’s proportion increased from 50.6% to 63.1% and the gram-positive isolate’s proportion decreased from 31.8% to 19%. Collection of a low number of blood cultures and a high contamination rate was identified in our clinic. In order to improve the usefulness of blood cultures as a diagnostic method, at least two sets should be collected in aseptic conditions. Full article
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