Special Issue "Feed Efficiency and Rumen Bacteria of Cattle"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Cattle".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Phillip Myer
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Animal Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA
Interests: Ruminant nutrition; Rumen microbiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With global food security challenges, scientists and producers alike are charged with determining ways to feed almost 10 billion people worldwide by 2050. To address the challenge of increasing protein production to feed a growing population, researchers must find ways to select and maintain feed efficient cattle beyond the boundary of current approaches. The rumen microbiome converts low-quality feedstuffs into usable energy for ruminants and represents the greatest opportunity to optimize cattle nutrition and growth for meeting future global protein demands. The critical role of the rumen microbiome is reflected in its impact on important production phenotypes, such as variation in feed efficiency. Therefore, this Special Issue will publish original research papers or reviews concerning the rumen microbiomes of cattle (both dairy and beef) and their relationship to feed efficiency. The scope of this Special Issue is broad to include a variety of expertise and research interests associated with this topic.

Dr. Phillip Myer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rumen
  • cattle
  • microbiome
  • feed efficiency
  • microbes
  • bacteria
  • archaea
  • fungi
  • protozoa

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Rumen Specific Bacteriome in Dry Dairy Cows and Its Possible Relationship with Phenotypes
Animals 2020, 10(10), 1791; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101791 - 01 Oct 2020
Abstract
Most microbiome studies of dairy cows have investigated the compositions and functions of rumen microbial communities in lactating dairy cows. The importance of the relationships among hosts, microbiota, diet composition, and milk production remains unknown in dry dairy cows. Thus, in the present [...] Read more.
Most microbiome studies of dairy cows have investigated the compositions and functions of rumen microbial communities in lactating dairy cows. The importance of the relationships among hosts, microbiota, diet composition, and milk production remains unknown in dry dairy cows. Thus, in the present study, the composition of the rumen microbiome in cows from three dairy farms was investigated to identify core bacteria contributing to various physiological roles during rumen fermentation in dry dairy cows. The results indicated that ruminal fluid in dry dairy cows from different regional farms had core rumen microbiota that could be clearly distinguished from that of cows of the other farms. Further identification of key microorganisms associated with each farm revealed that Prevotella, Methanobrevibacter, Pseudobutyrivibrio, Ruminococcus, Bacteroides, and Streptococcus were major contributors. Spearman’s correlation indicated that the abundance of genera such as Prevotella and Ruminococcus in dry dairy cows could indicate milk yield in the previous lactating period. Functional pathway analysis of the rumen bacterial communities demonstrated that amino acid metabolism and carbohydrate metabolism were the major pathways. Our findings provide knowledge of the composition and predicted functions of rumen microbiota in dry dairy cows from regional farms, which underscore the importance of the relationships among hosts, microbiota, diet composition, and milk production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feed Efficiency and Rumen Bacteria of Cattle)
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