Special Issue "Advances in the Symbiotic Relationship between Microbiome and Host Physiology in Domestic Animals"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Physiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Piccione
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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Science, University of Messina, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: chronophisiology; thermal biology; equine exercise physiology; transport stress; locomotor activity
Dr. Claudia Giannetto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Messina, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: chronophisiology; thermal biology; equine exercise physiology; transport stress; locomotor activity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Francesca Arfuso
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Messina, Polo Universitario dell’Annunziata, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: athletic horse; chronophysiology; exercise physiology; domestic animals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The harmonious relationship between the host and its microbiome contributes to the health status of animals, and the study of this relationship could be useful to guarantee animals’ health and welfare conditions. Among the factors regulating the symbiotic relationship between the host and the microbiome, the circadian clock maybe one of the key regulators of this relationship. It has been demonstrated that the microbiota showed diurnal rhythms in its composition and metabolite production. These fluctuations reprogram the circadian rhythmicity of host tissues both in the tissue itself and in other body sites.  Bidirectional communication between the host and the microbiota’s circadian rhythmicity drives local and systemic physiology. Disruption of that could impact the host’s physiology and disease susceptibility. This Special Issue welcomes submissions on the functional and intimate  relationship between the microbiome and the host, and on the intertwinement between the host’s circadian genes and the microbiota’s circadian rhythmicity.

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Piccione
Dr. Claudia Giannetto
Dr. Francesca Arfuso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tissue microbiota
  • circadian rhythm
  • physiology
  • genetic pathway
  • metabolic pathway
  • clock genes
  • domestic animals

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Maternal Milk Microbiome in Mammals of Different Types and Its Potential Role in the Neonatal Gut Microbiota Composition
Animals 2021, 11(12), 3349; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11123349 - 23 Nov 2021
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Abstract
Maternal milk, a main source of nutrition for neonates in early life, has attracted attention. An increasing number of studies have found that maternal milk has a high microbial diversity, as well as factors that might influence this diversity. However, there is a [...] Read more.
Maternal milk, a main source of nutrition for neonates in early life, has attracted attention. An increasing number of studies have found that maternal milk has a high microbial diversity, as well as factors that might influence this diversity. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the effects of host diet and phylogeny on maternal milk microbes and the contribution of the maternal milk microbiota to the neonatal gut microbiota. Here, we analyzed the maternal milk and fecal microbiota of nine species (lion, dog, panda, human, mouse, rhesus macaque, cow, goat, and rabbit) of mammals of three type groups (herbivore, omnivore, and carnivore) using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Our study provided evidence of host diet and phylogeny on the maternal milk microbiota. Moreover, functional prediction revealed that the carnivores had a significantly higher percentage of base excision repair, glycerolipid metabolism, taurine and hypotaurine metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism; while arginine and proline metabolism showed enrichment in the herbivore group. Source-tracking analysis showed that the contributions of bacteria from maternal milk to the microbiota of neonates of different mammals were different at day 3 after neonatal birth. Overall, our findings provided a theoretical basis for the maternal milk microbiota to affect neonatal fecal microbiota at day 3 after neonatal birth. Full article
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Article
The Level of Selected Bacterial Phyla on the Skin Surface of Small Ruminants According to the Breed and Species
Animals 2021, 11(9), 2734; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11092734 - 18 Sep 2021
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Abstract
For decades, skin has been assigned the main role of an insulator of the inside of the body from the external environment, but it also plays a role in maintaining homeostasis. In this study, the level of selected bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria [...] Read more.
For decades, skin has been assigned the main role of an insulator of the inside of the body from the external environment, but it also plays a role in maintaining homeostasis. In this study, the level of selected bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) was assessed in three sheep breeds (Świniarka sheep, Uhruska sheep and BCP line (synthetic sheep breed; n = 6) and in two breeds of goats (Boer, Saenian; n = 6) living in the same environment and fed on the same feed, where the aim was to identify differences in terms of race, species and individual differences. Significant differences were found in Firmicute, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria phyla (p ≤ 0.05). Statistically significant and positive correlations were demonstrated between Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes or Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. The obtained results suggest that the species and racial differences in the level of the studied bacterial phyla may also result from the physicochemical differences of the skin surface, as they could exacerbate the variations in humidity, temperature, composition of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) and lipid content. In addition, individual differences were observed, which indicate a similar effect of an individual on the microbiological composition of its organism. Full article
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