Special Issue "Integrated Weed Management Approaches and Decision Support Systems"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Weed Science and Weed Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ilias Travlos
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Crop Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 75, Iera Odos str., GR11855, Athens, Greece
Interests: weed biology and ecology; herbicide resistance; integrated weed management; agronomy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Per Rydahl

Guest Editor
Agronomist, IPM Consult ApS. Hovedgaden 32. DK-4295 Stenlille. Denmark
Interests: Integrated weed management; herbicide resistance; DSS; precision agriculture; agronomy
Dr. Jose Montull

Guest Editor
Researcher at the Deparment of Hortofruticulture, Botanics and Gardening. Agrotecnio. ETSEA, University of Lleida. 191, Rorivra Roure. 25191. Lleida, Spain
Interests: Integrated weed management; herbicide resistance; DSS; precision agriculture; agronomy
Dr. Arnd Verchwele

Guest Editor
Researcher, Julius Kühn-Institut (JKI) Messeweg 11/1238104 Braunschweig, Germany
Interests: Integrated weed management; herbicide resistance; DSS; precision agriculture; agronomy
Dr. Panagiotis Kanatas

Guest Editor
Researcher, Agricultural Cooperative of Mesolonghi-Nafpaktia, 30200 Mesolonghi, Greece
Interests: Agronomy; organic agriculture; integrated weed management; DSS; precision agriculture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The European Community Directive 128/2009 on the sustainable use of pesticides pays special attention to crop health with the minimum disruption of agro-ecosystems and reduced risks for human health and the environment. Integrated pest management (IPM) and integrated weed management (IWM) focus on cultural practices, justification of plant protection actions needed (based on tools such as monitoring, warning systems, early diagnosis, etc.), and chemical control at the lowest necessary levels without increasing the risk of resistance or side effects, with the parallel use of non-chemical methods. The IPM and IWM frameworks only work with systematic decision making. However, compared with decision-making processes in other economic activities, the decision-making processes in crop protection and weed science have received little attention.

Please share your studies on several topics related to integrated weed management and decision support systems in this Special Issue. In particular, submissions on the following topics (but not limited to these topics) are invited: (1) integrated weed management, (2) decision support systems, (3) cultural practices for weed management (e.g., crop rotation, false seedbeds), (4) modeling approaches, (5) use of reduced herbicide rates, (6) weed-competitive crops and cultivars, (7) proactive and reactive herbicide resistance management, (8) warning services, (9) economic thresholds, and (10) digital farming and robotics

Dr. Ilias Travlos
Dr. Per Rydahl
Dr. Jose Montull
Dr. Arnd Verchwele
Dr. Panagiotis Kanatas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • integrated weed management
  • decision support systems
  • weed-competitive crops and cultivars
  • herbicide resistance
  • economic thresholds
  • digital farming and robotics

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Sensitivity Assessment of Varieties, Effectiveness of Weed Control by Selected Herbicides, and Infection of the Fusarium in Maize (Zea mays L.) Cultivation
Agronomy 2020, 10(8), 1115; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10081115 (registering DOI) - 01 Aug 2020
Abstract
The amount of maize yield depends on many factors. Among them, plant health plays a significant role. Herbicide selectivity (of mesotrione, 2,4-D, and bromoxynil) for different maize varieties was assessed in greenhouse experiments. The effectiveness of herbicides (MCPA, 2,4-D + dicamba) and spraying [...] Read more.
The amount of maize yield depends on many factors. Among them, plant health plays a significant role. Herbicide selectivity (of mesotrione, 2,4-D, and bromoxynil) for different maize varieties was assessed in greenhouse experiments. The effectiveness of herbicides (MCPA, 2,4-D + dicamba) and spraying mixture of the herbicide MCPA with mepiquat chloride was tested on Chenopodium album L. and self-seeding winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.). The genetic distance between selected maize varieties and species composition of pathogens of the genus Fusarium isolated from the seeds of the discussed crop were examined. Research results indicated that individual herbicides differed in the selectivity in relation to maize, which depended on the crop variety. The selected herbicides showed high efficacy against the plants used in the experiment. The addition of mepiquat chloride to the composition of the spraying liquid did not affect the level of weed control. No relationship was found between the genetic distance of maize varieties and their sensitivity to selected herbicides. The presence of Fusarium subglutinans, Fusarium proliferatum, and Fusarium verticillioides was found in the samples of maize varieties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Weed Management Approaches and Decision Support Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessing the Ability of Durum Wheat-Thinopyrum ponticum Recombinant Lines to Suppress Naturally Occurring Weeds under Different Sowing Densities
Agronomy 2020, 10(5), 709; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10050709 - 15 May 2020
Abstract
The use of synthetic chemicals in cropping systems is becoming more controversial and highly debated worldwide, owing to its impacts on the environment, food safety, and human health. For this reason, sustainable crop management strategies are gaining increasing interest. In this perspective, agronomic [...] Read more.
The use of synthetic chemicals in cropping systems is becoming more controversial and highly debated worldwide, owing to its impacts on the environment, food safety, and human health. For this reason, sustainable crop management strategies are gaining increasing interest. In this perspective, agronomic practices and use of disease-resistant and competitive genotypes represent valuable tools in the hands of farmers. The competitive ability of two durum wheat-Thinopyrum ponticum recombinant lines (named R5 and R112), carrying effective resistance genes towards main rust diseases and enhanced yield-related traits in their alien chromosome segments, was investigated in comparison with that of a widely grown commercial cultivar (Tirex), under two sowing densities (250 and 350 seeds m−2), in the presence or absence of weeds. Yield-related traits and specific attributes that confer competitive ability were recorded in two subsequent seasons. R5 was the most weed-suppressive genotype, whereas Tirex was the least competitive. R112 was the best yield performer under favorable weather conditions (5.6 t ha−1), while it suffered the presence of weeds in the drier year (−38% grain yield). Although 350 seeds m−2 appeared to be the most effective sowing density for suppression of weeds (−16% weed biomass), adoption of the lower density can optimize grain yield and limit weed infestation in dry seasons. A suitable combination of sowing density and genotype choice can improve yield performance. R112 required the higher sowing rate to maximize grain yield (+43% as compared to the lower sowing rate), while R5 proved to be a density-neutral genotype. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Weed Management Approaches and Decision Support Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Weed Seed Bank Diversity in Dryland Cereal Fields: Does it Differ Along the Field and Between Fields with Different Landscape Structure?
Agronomy 2020, 10(4), 575; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10040575 - 17 Apr 2020
Abstract
In this work, we aimed to test whether taxonomic diversity and functional diversity and the values of functional traits of the weed seed bank varied across the field, from margins to the core, and between fields embedded in distinct landscape structures. We sampled [...] Read more.
In this work, we aimed to test whether taxonomic diversity and functional diversity and the values of functional traits of the weed seed bank varied across the field, from margins to the core, and between fields embedded in distinct landscape structures. We sampled the seed bank of 47 conventionally managed cereal fields from two Mediterranean regions in Spain. In each field, three positions were selected: Margin, edge and core, and soil properties were measured for each position. Landscape structure was quantified for each field as the percentage of arable land in the surrounding 1 km radius circular sector. Seed bank diversity was characterized at the taxonomic (species richness, exponential Shannon index, and evenness) and functional levels (Rao’s quadratic entropy index and four corner analysis). For functional diversity, eight functional traits related to the whole plant life cycle were considered. Results showed a slight response of increasing taxonomic diversity from the core of the fields to the margins. Functional diversity was extremely low, indicating high similarity among species in terms of functional traits. Species in the seed bank were mostly therophytes, shorter than the crop plants, small seeded, flowering between the herbicide application of late winter and crop harvest, and showed seed dispersal by gravity or wind. This trait syndrome allows persistence in intensively managed arable lands. The similarity between fields in terms of functional diversity of the seed bank and in species traits may suggest that the intensity of management practices was similar across the fields. Moreover, it emphasizes that an increase in landscape heterogeneity, if based on other intensively managed cropping systems, may not be sufficient to augment functional diversity of weed communities. Therefore, in these areas, the seed bank could restore weed taxonomic diversity following changes in management practices, but functional diversity would still remain limited. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Weed Management Approaches and Decision Support Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of the Effectiveness of Shielded Band Spraying in Weed Control in Field Crops
Agronomy 2020, 10(4), 475; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10040475 - 30 Mar 2020
Abstract
An important factor along with the availability of food is its quality. It depends, among other things, on the type of plant protection products used and the method of their application. This manuscript presents research on the possibility of using a shielded band [...] Read more.
An important factor along with the availability of food is its quality. It depends, among other things, on the type of plant protection products used and the method of their application. This manuscript presents research on the possibility of using a shielded band sprayer in field onion cultivation. The shielded band spraying technology presented in this article is the subject of a patent application (application number P.428494-The prototype of the machine was produced in Poland in cooperation with the University of Life Sciences in Poznań). The research consisted in comparing the quantity and quality of the obtained crop, based on various methods of reducing the weed population. The research results indicate that the proposed shielded band spraying technology may affect the food quality (the active substance is not sprayed on onion plants) and profitability of farms (less use of plant protection products). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Weed Management Approaches and Decision Support Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Burner Position on Temperature Distribution in Soybean Flaming
Agronomy 2020, 10(3), 391; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030391 - 13 Mar 2020
Abstract
The main objective of this study was to identify optimal burner orientation for a newly designed flame cultivator by quantifying the flame temperature distributions of cross, back, and parallel position of burners at different heights of the soybean canopy (distance from the soil [...] Read more.
The main objective of this study was to identify optimal burner orientation for a newly designed flame cultivator by quantifying the flame temperature distributions of cross, back, and parallel position of burners at different heights of the soybean canopy (distance from the soil surface). Flame temperatures were measured within-row for three burner orientations at seven propane doses (20–100 kg/ha) and eight different canopy heights (0–18 cm above soil surface). Soybean plants in V3 growth stage were flamed with the same doses and burner orientations, and 28 days after treatment (DAT) crop injury (0%–100%), plant height (cm), dry matter (g) and grain yield (t/ha) were assessed. All three burner orientations had high flame temperatures at lower canopy heights (<6 cm high) that gradually decreased with increasing canopy height (6–18 cm). Measured temperatures ranged from 33 to 234 ℃ for cross flaming, 29 to 269 ℃ for back flaming and 23 to 155 ℃ for parallel flaming, with high variability in temperature patterns. Back flaming generated flame temperatures above 100℃ at a lower propane dose (27 kg/ha) compared to cross and parallel flaming (40 and 50 kg/ha). For all tested parameters, parallel and cross flaming had better impact on soybeans than back flaming, but for weed control in crop rows, cross flaming is recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Weed Management Approaches and Decision Support Systems)
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Open AccessCommunication
The Effect of Salicylic Acid and 20 Substituted Molecules on Alleviating Metolachlor Herbicide Injury in Rice (Oryza sativa)
Agronomy 2020, 10(3), 317; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030317 - 25 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Salicylic acid (SA) is an endogenous plant hormone that has a wide range of pharmacological effects. Studies have indicated that SA has herbicide safening activity. In this study, the herbicide safening activity of SA and 20 substituted molecules were tested on agar-cultured rice. [...] Read more.
Salicylic acid (SA) is an endogenous plant hormone that has a wide range of pharmacological effects. Studies have indicated that SA has herbicide safening activity. In this study, the herbicide safening activity of SA and 20 substituted molecules were tested on agar-cultured rice. Biological assay results indicated that SA and substituted SA had a low inhibitory effect on the growth of rice seedlings (Oryza sativa), and partially alleviated the effects of metolachlor toxicity. Moreover, at 0.25 mg L−1, the safening effect of compounds l and u lessened the effects of metolachlor phytotoxicity on plant height and fresh weight when compared to the effects of the control, fenclorim. The effects of metolachlor toxicity were reduced on root length due to the safening effects of compounds l, n, and u; these effects were greater than those of fenclorim. These compounds could facilitate the development of novel herbicide safeners. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Weed Management Approaches and Decision Support Systems)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Benefits and Limitations of Decision Support Systems (DSS) with a Special Emphasis on Weeds
Agronomy 2020, 10(4), 548; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10040548 - 10 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Decision support systems (DSS) have the potential to support farmers to make the right decisions in weed management. DSSs can select the appropriate herbicides for a given field and suggest the minimum dose rates for an herbicide application that can result in optimum [...] Read more.
Decision support systems (DSS) have the potential to support farmers to make the right decisions in weed management. DSSs can select the appropriate herbicides for a given field and suggest the minimum dose rates for an herbicide application that can result in optimum weed control. Given that the adoption of DSSs may lead to decreased herbicide inputs in crop production, their potential for creating eco-friendly and profitable weed management strategies is obvious and desirable for the re-designing of farming systems on a more sustainable basis. Nevertheless, it is difficult to stimulate farmers to use DSSs as it has been noticed that farmers have different expectations of decision-making tools depending on their farming styles and usual practices. The function of DSSs requires accurate assessments of weeds within a field as input data; however, capturing the data can be problematic. The development of future DSSs should target to enhance weed management tactics which are less reliant on herbicides. DSSs should also provide information regarding weed seedbank dynamics in the soil in order to suggest management options not only within a single period but also in a rotational view. More aspects ought to be taken into account and further research is needed in order to optimize the practical use of DSSs for supporting farmers regarding weed management issues in various crops and under various soil and climatic conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Weed Management Approaches and Decision Support Systems)
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