Special Issue "Weeds and Herbicide Resistance: Challenges, Approaches and Perspectives"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Josef Soukup
Website
Guest Editor
Professor and Head of the Department of Agroecology and Biometeorology at the Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 21 Praha 6 – Suchdol, Czech Republic
Interests: weed ecology; chemical weed control; weed resistance and herbicide tolerant crops; agroecology
Dr. Ilias Travlos
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Crop Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 75, Iera Odos str., GR11855, Athens, Greece
Interests: weed biology and ecology; herbicide resistance; integrated weed management; agronomy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Herbicide resistance in weeds poses one of the major risks for sustainability of herbicide use and farming systems. The present Special Issue focuses on herbicide resistance mechanisms and management and includes, but is not limited to, the following topics:

  • New cases of herbicide resistance (species, modes of action)
  • Physiology and ecology of herbicide resistant biotypes
  • Dynamics of herbicide resistance in populations in space and time
  • Mechanisms and patterns of herbicide resistance
  • New tests for detection of resistance
  • Surveys, mapping and databasing of herbicide resistance
  • Integrated management of herbicide resistance
  • Decision support systems and informatics
  • New technologies and precision agriculture for prevention and management of resistance

Research papers and reviews on one or more of the above-mentioned issues or any other relevant to herbicide resistance are welcome. The goal of this Special Issue is, not only to present the most advanced research dealing with herbicide resistance, but also to show the most recent trends and approaches.

Prof. Dr. Josef Soukup
Assist. Prof. Ilias Travlos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Herbicide resistance
  • Target site resistance (TSR)
  • Non-target site resistance (NTSR)
  • Mechanisms of resistance
  • Fitness cost
  • Resistance testing and quick tests
  • Integrated weed management
  • Agronomic practices
  • Alternative herbicides
  • Precision agriculture approaches

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Suppressing Alopecurus myosuroides Huds. in Rotations of Winter-Annual and Spring Crops
Agriculture 2018, 8(7), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8070091 - 23 Jun 2018
Abstract
Alopecurus myosuroides Huds. has become one of the most abundant grass weeds in Europe. High percentages of winter-annual crops in the rotation, earlier sowing of winter wheat and non-inversion tillage favor A.myosuroides. Additionally, many populations in Europe have developed resistance to [...] Read more.
Alopecurus myosuroides Huds. has become one of the most abundant grass weeds in Europe. High percentages of winter-annual crops in the rotation, earlier sowing of winter wheat and non-inversion tillage favor A.myosuroides. Additionally, many populations in Europe have developed resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase), acetolactate synthase (ALS) and photosynthetic (PSII) inhibitors. Hence, yield losses due to A.myosuroides have increased. On-farm studies have been carried out in Southern Germany over five years to investigate abundance, control efficacies and crop yield losses due to A.myosuroides. Three crop rotations were established with varying proportions of winter- and summer-annual crops. The crop rotations had a share of 0, 25 and 50% of summer-annual crops. Within each crop rotation, three herbicide strategies were tested. In contrast to classical herbicidal mixtures and sequences, the aim of one of the herbicide strategies was to keep selection pressure as low as possible by using each mode of action (MOA) only once during the five years. A.myosuroides population was susceptible to all herbicide at the beginning of the experiment. Initial average density was 14 plants m−2. In the rotation with only winter-annual crops, density increased to 5347 ears m−2 in the untreated control plots. Densities were lower in the rotations with 25% and even lower with 50% summer-annual crops. Control efficacies against A. myosuroides in the herbicide strategy using only MOAs of the HRAC-groups B and A, according to the Herbicide Resistance Action Committee (HRAC) classification on MOA, dropped after five years compared to the strategy of changing MOA in every year. Nevertheless, the results demonstrate the need for combining preventive and direct weed-management strategies to suppress A.myosuroides and maintain high weed-control efficacies of the herbicides. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Emerging Challenges for Weed Management in Herbicide-Resistant Crops
Agriculture 2019, 9(8), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture9080180 - 14 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Since weed management is such a critical component of agronomic crop production systems, herbicides are widely used to provide weed control to ensure that yields are maximized. In the last few years, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly those that are glyphosate-resistant, and more recently, [...] Read more.
Since weed management is such a critical component of agronomic crop production systems, herbicides are widely used to provide weed control to ensure that yields are maximized. In the last few years, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly those that are glyphosate-resistant, and more recently, those with dicamba (3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid) and 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) resistance are changing the way many growers manage weeds. However, past reliance on glyphosate and mistakes made in stewardship of the glyphosate-resistant cropping system have directly led to the current weed resistance problems that now occur in many agronomic cropping systems, and new technologies must be well-stewarded. New herbicide-resistant trait technologies in soybean, such as dicamba-, 2,4-D-, and isoxaflutole- ((5-cyclopropyl-4-isoxazolyl)[2-(methylsulfonyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methanone) resistance, are being combined with glyphosate- and glufosinate-resistance traits to manage herbicide-resistant weed populations. In cropping systems with glyphosate-resistant weed species, these new trait options may provide effective weed management tools, although there may be increased risk of off-target movement and susceptible plant damage with the use of some of these technologies. The use of diverse weed management practices to reduce the selection pressure for herbicide-resistant weed evolution is essential to preserve the utility of new traits. The use of herbicides with differing sites of action (SOAs), ideally in combination as mixtures, but also in rotation as part of a weed management program may slow the evolution of resistance in some cases. Increased selection pressure from the effects of some herbicide mixtures may lead to more cases of metabolic herbicide resistance. The most effective long-term approach for weed resistance management is the use of Integrated Weed Management (IWM) which may build the ecological complexity of the cropping system. Given the challenges in management of herbicide-resistant weeds, IWM will likely play a critical role in enhancing future food security for a growing global population. Full article
Open AccessReview
Shifting the Paradigm: An Ecological Systems Approach to Weed Management
Agriculture 2019, 9(8), 179; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture9080179 - 13 Aug 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Weeds have been historically, and are still today, the primary and most economically important pest in agriculture. Several selection pressures associated with weed management, such as an overreliance on herbicides, have promoted the rapid evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds. Integrated Weed Management (IWM) is [...] Read more.
Weeds have been historically, and are still today, the primary and most economically important pest in agriculture. Several selection pressures associated with weed management, such as an overreliance on herbicides, have promoted the rapid evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds. Integrated Weed Management (IWM) is promoted as an ecological systems approach, through the combination of biological, chemical, cultural, ecological, and mechanical control methods. The concept of a systems approach is defined as managing weeds by combining practice and knowledge with the goals of increasing yield and minimizing economic loss, minimizing risks to human health and the environment, and reducing energy requirements and off-target impacts. The reliance on herbicides in modern cropping systems has shifted the management focus from requiring intimate knowledge of biology, ecology, and ecological systems to herbicide chemistry, mixes, and rotations, application technology, and herbicide-tolerant crop traits. Here, an ecological systems approach is considered, examining new trends and technologies in relation to IWM and weed ecology. Prevention of spread, seedbank management, crop rotations, tillage, cover crops, competitive cultivars, biological weed control, and future solutions in concept-only are presented, and knowledge gaps are identified where research advancements may be possible. An ecological systems approach will provide improved stewardship of new herbicide technologies and reduce herbicide resistance evolution through diversification of selection pressures. Agroecological interactions should be studied in light of new, developing weed control technologies. The science of weed management needs to refocus on the foundations of weed biology and ecology to enable an ecological systems approach and promote agricultural sustainability. Full article
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