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Foods, Volume 4, Issue 2 (June 2015) , Pages 51-262

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Open AccessArticle Spatial Variation in the Mercury Concentration of Muscle Myomeres in Steaks of Farmed Southern Bluefin Tuna
Foods 2015, 4(2), 254-262; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020254
Received: 11 May 2015 / Accepted: 8 June 2015 / Published: 16 June 2015
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Abstract
Mercury concentration in the muscular tissue of farmed southern bluefin tuna, Thunnus maccoyii (SBT) is known to vary. Data suggests that mercury concentration is negatively correlated with the lipid concentration of tissues. Those areas that accumulate higher levels of lipid are noted to [...] Read more.
Mercury concentration in the muscular tissue of farmed southern bluefin tuna, Thunnus maccoyii (SBT) is known to vary. Data suggests that mercury concentration is negatively correlated with the lipid concentration of tissues. Those areas that accumulate higher levels of lipid are noted to have a lower mercury concentration than lean tissues. Here we further delineate variation in mercury concentration within SBT muscular tissues by determining the concentration of mercury in the muscle myomeres (those sections within whole muscles) of transverse sectional steaks of farmed SBT. Mercury concentration in myomeres is observed to significantly decrease with dorsal and ventral distance from the spine or lateral line of fish. By extension, evidence is provided for the variation of mercury concentration within tissue cuts present in SBT steaks. This paper provides the first documentation of variation in mercury concentration within muscular tissue of fish. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Emergence of Seaweed and Seaweed-Containing Foods in the UK: Focus on Labeling, Iodine Content, Toxicity and Nutrition
Foods 2015, 4(2), 240-253; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020240
Received: 28 April 2015 / Accepted: 4 June 2015 / Published: 15 June 2015
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Abstract
Seaweed (edible algae) is not a staple food in the Western diet, despite occasional use as a traditional ingredient in coastal areas. High nutritional value, combined with the expansion of the health-food industry, has led to a resurgence of seaweed in the British [...] Read more.
Seaweed (edible algae) is not a staple food in the Western diet, despite occasional use as a traditional ingredient in coastal areas. High nutritional value, combined with the expansion of the health-food industry, has led to a resurgence of seaweed in the British diet. While seaweed could be useful in tackling dietary iodine insufficiency, consumption of some species and sources of seaweed has also been associated with risks, such as toxicity from high iodine levels, or accumulation of arsenic, heavy metals and contaminants. The current retail level of seaweed and edible algae in the UK market, either as whole foods or ingredients, was evaluated with particular focus on labelling and iodine content. Seaweed-containing products (n = 224) were identified. Only 22 products (10%) stated information regarding iodine content and another 40 (18%) provided information sufficient to estimate the iodine content. For these products, the median iodine content was 110 μg/g (IQR 21–503) and 585 μg per estimated serving (IQR 105–2520). While calculations for iodine exposure per serving relied on assumptions, 26 products could potentially lead to an iodine intake above the (European) tolerable adult upper level of 600 μg/day. In the context of the data presented, there is scope to improve product labelling (species, source, processing, content). Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Combined Effect of High Hydrostatic Pressure and Calcium Salts on the Stability, Solubility and Gel Formation of β-Lactoglobulin
Foods 2015, 4(2), 229-239; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020229
Received: 30 March 2015 / Revised: 19 May 2015 / Accepted: 1 June 2015 / Published: 8 June 2015
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Abstract
Stability, aggregation and gelation of β-Lactoglobulin are affected by high pressure and salts of the Hofmeister series. Little is known about their combined effects on structure formation processes of β-Lactoglobulin, mainly because many salts of the series are not suitable for use in [...] Read more.
Stability, aggregation and gelation of β-Lactoglobulin are affected by high pressure and salts of the Hofmeister series. Little is known about their combined effects on structure formation processes of β-Lactoglobulin, mainly because many salts of the series are not suitable for use in food. Here, we investigate the effect of calcium salts on the strength of pressure-induced gels, inspired by the fact that high pressure and salts change the water structure in a similar way. We find that the larger the applied pressures, the higher the strength of the gels. In addition to pressure, there is a significant influence by the type of anions and the amount of added calcium salts. Gel strength increases in the order CaCl2 < Ca (NO3)2 < CaI2. This trend correlates with the position of the salts in the Hofmeister series. The results are explained by analogy with the thermal aggregate formation by taking reaction rates for unfolding and aggregation, as well as specific/non-specific salts effect into consideration. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Chemical Profile, Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activity of Algerian Citrus Essential Oils and Their Application in Sardina pilchardus
Foods 2015, 4(2), 208-228; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020208
Received: 14 February 2015 / Accepted: 7 May 2015 / Published: 5 June 2015
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Abstract
Stored fish are frequently contaminated by foodborne pathogens. Lipid oxidation and microbial growth during storage are also important factors in the shelf-life of fresh fish. In order to ensure the safety of fish items, there is a need for control measures which are [...] Read more.
Stored fish are frequently contaminated by foodborne pathogens. Lipid oxidation and microbial growth during storage are also important factors in the shelf-life of fresh fish. In order to ensure the safety of fish items, there is a need for control measures which are effective through natural inhibitory antimicrobials. It is also necessary to determine the efficacy of these products for fish protection against oxidative damage, to avoid deleterious changes and loss of commercial and nutritional value. Some synthetic chemicals used as preservatives have been reported to cause harmful effects to the environment and the consumers. The present investigation reports on the extraction by hydrodistillation and the chemical composition of three citrus peel essential oils (EOs): orange (Citrus sinensis L.), lemon (Citrus limonum L.) and bergamot (Citrus aurantium L.) from Algeria. Yields for EOs were between 0.50% and 0.70%. The chemical composition of these EOs was determined by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The results showed that the studied oils are made up mainly of limonene (77.37%) for orange essential oil (EO); linalyl acetate (37.28%), linalool (23.36%), for bergamot EO; and finally limonene (51.39%), β-pinene (17.04%) and γ-terpinene (13.46%) for lemon EO. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the EOs was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) using the agar diffusion technique. Results revealed that lemon EO had more antibacterial effects than that from other EOs. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) showed a range of 0.25–0.40 μL/mL. Lemon and bergamot citrus peel EOs were added at 1 × MIC and 4 × MIC values to Sardina pilchardus (S. pilchardus) experimentally inoculated with S. aureus at a level of 3.5 log10 CFU/g and stored at 8 ± 1 °C. The results obtained revealed that the 4 × MIC value of bergamot reduced completely the growth of S. aureus from day 2 until the end of storage. The presence of EOs significantly extended lipid stability. Samples treated with bergamot EO displayed greater antioxidant activity than lemon EO. In fact, the oxidation rate is inversely proportional to the concentration of EO. At 1 × MIC and 4 × MIC values of bergamot EO, the levels of malonaldehyde compared to the control samples were 1.66 and 1.28 mg malonaldehyde/kg at the end of storage, corresponding to inhibition percentages of 42.76% and 55.87%, respectively. These results suggest the possibility that citrus EOs could be used as a way of combating the growth of common causes of food poisoning and used as potent natural preservatives to contribute to the reduction of lipid oxidation in sardines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiology Safety of Meat Products)
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Open AccessArticle High Hydrostatic Pressure Pretreatment of Whey Protein Isolates Improves Their Digestibility and Antioxidant Capacity
Foods 2015, 4(2), 184-207; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020184
Received: 31 March 2015 / Revised: 15 May 2015 / Accepted: 20 May 2015 / Published: 28 May 2015
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 1988 | PDF Full-text (652 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Whey proteins have well-established antioxidant and anti-inflammatory bioactivities. High hydrostatic pressure processing of whey protein isolates increases their in vitro digestibility resulting in enhanced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. This study compared the effects of different digestion protocols on the digestibility of pressurized (pWPI) [...] Read more.
Whey proteins have well-established antioxidant and anti-inflammatory bioactivities. High hydrostatic pressure processing of whey protein isolates increases their in vitro digestibility resulting in enhanced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. This study compared the effects of different digestion protocols on the digestibility of pressurized (pWPI) and native (nWPI) whey protein isolates and the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of the hydrolysates. The pepsin-pancreatin digestion protocol was modified to better simulate human digestion by adjusting temperature and pH conditions, incubation times, enzymes utilized, enzyme-to-substrate ratio and ultrafiltration membrane molecular weight cut-off. pWPI showed a significantly greater proteolysis rate and rate of peptide appearance regardless of digestion protocol. Both digestion methods generated a greater relative abundance of eluting peptides and the appearance of new peptide peaks in association with pWPI digestion in comparison to nWPI hydrolysates. Hydrolysates of pWPI from both digestion conditions showed enhanced ferric-reducing antioxidant power relative to nWPI hydrolysates. Likewise, pWPI hydrolysates from both digestion protocols showed similar enhanced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in a respiratory epithelial cell line as compared to nWPI hydrolysates. These findings indicate that regardless of considerable variations of in vitro digestion protocols, pressurization of WPI leads to more efficient digestion that improves its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
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Open AccessReview Multi-Pulsed High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment of Foods
Foods 2015, 4(2), 173-183; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020173
Received: 16 February 2015 / Accepted: 16 May 2015 / Published: 25 May 2015
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Abstract
Multi-pulsed high hydrostatic pressure (mpHHP) treatment of foods has been investigated for more than two decades. It was reported that the mpHHP treatment, with few exceptions, is more effective than the classical or single-pulsed HHP (spHHP) treatment for inactivation of microorganisms in fruit [...] Read more.
Multi-pulsed high hydrostatic pressure (mpHHP) treatment of foods has been investigated for more than two decades. It was reported that the mpHHP treatment, with few exceptions, is more effective than the classical or single-pulsed HHP (spHHP) treatment for inactivation of microorganisms in fruit juice, dairy products, liquid whole egg, meat products, and sea foods. Moreover, the mpHHP treatment could be also used to inactivate enzymes in foods and to increase the shelf-life of foods. The effects of the mpHHP treatment of foods are summarized and the differences between the mpHHP and spHHP are also emphasized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
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Open AccessArticle Quality Characteristics and Shelf-Life of Ultra-High Pressure Homogenized (UHPH) Almond Beverage
Foods 2015, 4(2), 159-172; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020159
Received: 9 April 2015 / Revised: 7 May 2015 / Accepted: 9 May 2015 / Published: 20 May 2015
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Abstract
The effects of ultra-high-pressure homogenization (UHPH) at 200 MPa, in combination with different inlet temperatures (55 or 75 °C) during storage at 4 °C were studied and compared with pasteurized (90 °C, 90 s) almond beverage. Microbiological analysis of the physical (particle sedimentation [...] Read more.
The effects of ultra-high-pressure homogenization (UHPH) at 200 MPa, in combination with different inlet temperatures (55 or 75 °C) during storage at 4 °C were studied and compared with pasteurized (90 °C, 90 s) almond beverage. Microbiological analysis of the physical (particle sedimentation and color) and volatile profile of the most relevant compound in almond beverages was performed at days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of cold storage. UHPH treatment 200 at 75 °C led to higher microbiological reduction after treatment and higher stability during cold storage in almond beverages than pasteurization or UHPH 200 at 55 °C. Physical characteristics of UHPH-treated samples exhibited a high stability during storage with a stable color. Volatile compounds extracted by solid-phase microextraction were identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The effect of UHPH treatment significantly (p < 0.05) affected the volatile profile compared with pasteurized beverages, although UHPH conditions applied produced similar effects in almond beverages. Benzaldehyde was the most abundant compound detected in all treatments. Hexanal was more abundant in UHPH-treated samples, indicating a higher lipid oxidation compared to pasteurized almond beverages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
Open AccessArticle Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Water Absorption of Adzuki Beans
Foods 2015, 4(2), 148-158; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020148
Received: 13 March 2015 / Accepted: 7 May 2015 / Published: 14 May 2015
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Abstract
The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment on dried soybean, adzuki bean, and kintoki kidney bean, which are low-moisture-content cellular biological materials, was investigated from the viewpoint of water absorption. The samples were vacuum-packed with distilled water and pressurized at 200 MPa [...] Read more.
The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment on dried soybean, adzuki bean, and kintoki kidney bean, which are low-moisture-content cellular biological materials, was investigated from the viewpoint of water absorption. The samples were vacuum-packed with distilled water and pressurized at 200 MPa and 25 °C for 10 min. After the HHP treatment, time courses of the moisture contents of the samples were measured, and the dimensionless moisture contents were estimated. Water absorption in the case of soybean could be fitted well by a simple water diffusion model. High pressures were found to have negligible effects on water absorption into the cotyledon of soybean and kintoki kidney bean. A non-linear least square method based on the Weibull equation was applied for the adzuki beans, and the effective water diffusion coefficient was found to increase significantly from 8.6 × 10−13 to 6.7 × 10−10 m2/s after HHP treatment. Approximately 30% of the testa of the adzuki bean was damaged upon HHP treatment, which was comparable to the surface area of the testa in the partially peeled adzuki bean sample. Thus, HHP was confirmed to promote mass transfer to the cotyledon of legumes with a tight testa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
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Open AccessArticle Oxalate Content of the Herb Good-King-Henry, Blitum Bonus-Henricus
Foods 2015, 4(2), 140-147; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020140
Received: 20 March 2015 / Revised: 5 May 2015 / Accepted: 7 May 2015 / Published: 12 May 2015
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Abstract
The total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of the leaves, stems and buds of Good-King-Henry (Blitum Bonus-Henricus) were extracted and measured using HPLC chromatography. The large, mature leaves contained 42% more total oxalate than in the small leaves and the soluble [...] Read more.
The total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of the leaves, stems and buds of Good-King-Henry (Blitum Bonus-Henricus) were extracted and measured using HPLC chromatography. The large, mature leaves contained 42% more total oxalate than in the small leaves and the soluble oxalate content of the large leaves was 33% higher than the smaller leaves. Cooking the mixed leaves, stems and buds in boiling water for two minutes significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the total oxalate when compared to the raw plant parts. Pesto sauce made from mixed leaves contained 257 mg total oxalate/100 g fresh weight; this was largely made up of insoluble oxalates (85% of the total oxalate content). Soup made from mixed leaves contained lower levels of total oxalates (44.26 ± 0.49 mg total oxalate/100 g fresh weight) and insoluble oxalate made up 49% of the oxalate contents. The levels of oxalates in the Good-King-Henry leaves were high, suggesting that the leaves should be consumed occasionally as a delicacy because of their unique taste rather than as a significant part of the diet. However, the products made from Good-King-Henry leaves indicated that larger amounts could be consumed as the oxalate levels were reduced by dilution and processing. Full article
Open AccessArticle A Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Study Evaluating UP165 and S-Adenosyl-l-Methionine on Depression, Anxiety and Psychological Well-Being
Foods 2015, 4(2), 130-139; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020130
Received: 20 March 2015 / Revised: 24 April 2015 / Accepted: 29 April 2015 / Published: 8 May 2015
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Abstract
The primary objective of this pilot clinical trial was to evaluate the effects of UP165 (derived from Zea mays L., commonly known as corn) over time. The secondary objective was the comparison for outcomes versus S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM-e). Subjects with mild depression or [...] Read more.
The primary objective of this pilot clinical trial was to evaluate the effects of UP165 (derived from Zea mays L., commonly known as corn) over time. The secondary objective was the comparison for outcomes versus S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM-e). Subjects with mild depression or anxiety were given the Beck Depression Inventory second edition (BDI-II), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the Schwartz Outcome Scale (SOS-10). Forty-two subjects (21–65 years old) were randomized to eight-weeks of supplementation with UP165 or SAM-e with questionnaires being administered at randomization, week four and eight. Those receiving UP165 achieved significant reduction from baseline at weeks four and eight, respectively for the BDI-II, as well as a trend for reduction in BAI at week four and significance at week eight. There was a trend for improvement on the SOS at week four and significance at week eight. SAM-e demonstrated a trend for improvement on the BDI-II by week eight over the UP165 with no differences between the two for the BAI or the SOS. Overall, this study indicates that there may be benefit to UP165 for mood enhancement in those with mild depression or anxiety. Randomized placebo comparator trials appear warranted. Full article
Open AccessArticle Incidence, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Toxin Genes Possession Screening of Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Chicken Livers and Gizzards
Foods 2015, 4(2), 115-129; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020115
Received: 18 August 2014 / Revised: 31 March 2015 / Accepted: 13 April 2015 / Published: 21 April 2015
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Abstract
Few recent outbreaks in Europe and the US involving Campylobacter and Salmonella were linked to the consumption of chicken livers. Studies investigating Staphylococcus aureus in chicken livers and gizzards are very limited. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, antimicrobial [...] Read more.
Few recent outbreaks in Europe and the US involving Campylobacter and Salmonella were linked to the consumption of chicken livers. Studies investigating Staphylococcus aureus in chicken livers and gizzards are very limited. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, antimicrobial resistance, and virulence of S. aureus and MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus) in retail chicken livers and gizzards in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In this study, 156 chicken livers and 39 chicken gizzards samples of two brands were collected. While one of the brands showed very low prevalence of 1% (1/100) for S. aureus in chicken livers and gizzards, the second brand showed prevalence of 37% (31/95). No MRSA was detected since none harbored the mecA or mecC gene. Eighty seven S. aureus isolates from livers and 28 from gizzards were screened for antimicrobial resistance to 16 antimicrobials and the possession of 18 toxin genes. Resistance to most of the antimicrobials screened including cefoxitin and oxacillin was higher in the chicken gizzards isolates. While the prevalence of enterotoxin genes seg and sei was higher in the gizzards isolates, the prevalence of hemolysin genes hla, hlb, and hld was higher in the livers ones. The lucocidin genes lukE-lukD was equally prevalent in chicken livers and gizzards isolates. Using spa typing, a subset of the recovered isolates showed that they are not known to be livestock associated and, hence, may be of a human origin. In conclusion, this study stresses the importance of thorough cooking of chicken livers and gizzards since it might contain multidrug resistant enterotoxigenic S. aureus. To our knowledge this is the first study to specifically investigate the prevalence of S. aureus in chicken livers and gizzards in the US. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiology Safety of Meat Products)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Pressure, Temperature, Treatment Time, and Storage on Rheological, Textural, and Structural Properties of Heat-Induced Chickpea Gels
Foods 2015, 4(2), 80-114; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020080
Received: 13 March 2015 / Revised: 7 April 2015 / Accepted: 9 April 2015 / Published: 15 April 2015
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Abstract
Pressure-induced gelatinization of chickpea flour (CF) was studied in combination with subsequent temperature-induced gelatinization. CF slurries (with 1:5 flour-to-water ratio) and CF in powder form were treated with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), temperature (T), and treatment time (t) at [...] Read more.
Pressure-induced gelatinization of chickpea flour (CF) was studied in combination with subsequent temperature-induced gelatinization. CF slurries (with 1:5 flour-to-water ratio) and CF in powder form were treated with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), temperature (T), and treatment time (t) at three levels (200, 400, 600 MPa; 10, 25, 50 °C; 5, 15, 25 min). In order to investigate the effect of storage (S), half of the HHP-treated CF slurries were immediately analyzed for changes in oscillatory rheological properties under isothermal heating at 75 °C for 15 min followed by cooling to 25 °C. The other half of the HHP-treated CF slurries were refrigerated (at 4 °C) for one week and subsequently analyzed for changes in oscillatory properties under the same heating conditions as the unrefrigerated samples. HHP-treated CF in powder form was analyzed for changes in textural properties of heat-induced CF gels under isothermal heating at 90 °C for 5 min and subsequent cooling to 25 °C. Structural changes during gelatinization were investigated using microscopy. Pressure had a more significant effect on rheological and textural properties, followed by T and treatment t (in that order). Gel aging in HHP-treated CF slurries during storage was supported by rheological measurements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
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Open AccessArticle Combined Effect of Pressure-Assisted Thermal Processing and Antioxidants on the Retention of Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Milk
Foods 2015, 4(2), 65-79; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020065
Received: 21 January 2015 / Revised: 18 March 2015 / Accepted: 28 March 2015 / Published: 14 April 2015
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Abstract
The effect of pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP) in combination with seven synthetic antioxidants was evaluated on the retention of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in enriched milk. Milk rich in CLA was first saturated with oxygen, followed by the addition of either catechin, cysteine, [...] Read more.
The effect of pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP) in combination with seven synthetic antioxidants was evaluated on the retention of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in enriched milk. Milk rich in CLA was first saturated with oxygen, followed by the addition of either catechin, cysteine, ascorbic acid, tannic acid, gallic acid, caffeic acid or p-coumaric acid (500 mg kg1 untreated milk). Samples were treated at 600 MPa and 120 °C up to 15 min of holding time. During PATP, CLA not only oxidized at a slower rate, but also less oxygen was consumed compared to the control (0.1 MPa and 120 °C). In addition, phenolic antioxidants were able to quench dissolved oxygen in samples treated with PATP. For those samples added with gallic acid and catechin, 85% and 75% of the CLA was retained after 15 min of holding time at 600 MPa and 120 °C, respectively. The retention of CLA was enhanced by the application of PATP in combination with gallic acid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
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Open AccessArticle Stability of Capsaicinoids and Antioxidants in Dry Hot Peppers under Different Packaging and Storage Temperatures
Foods 2015, 4(2), 51-64; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4020051
Received: 22 January 2015 / Accepted: 26 March 2015 / Published: 31 March 2015
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Abstract
The maintenance of the quality and storage life of perishable fruits and vegetables is a major challenge for the food industry. In this study, the effects of different temperatures, packaging materials and storage time on the stability of capsaicinoids and antioxidants, such as [...] Read more.
The maintenance of the quality and storage life of perishable fruits and vegetables is a major challenge for the food industry. In this study, the effects of different temperatures, packaging materials and storage time on the stability of capsaicinoids and antioxidants, such as total carotenoids, ascorbic acid and total phenolic compounds, were studied in three commercially cultivated hot pepper hybrids, namely Sky Red, Maha and Wonder King. For this purpose, dry whole pods were packed in jute bags and low-density polyethylene bags (LDPE), stored for five months under controlled conditions at 20, 25 or 30 C and analyzed on Day 0 and at 50-day intervals until Day 150. The three hot pepper hybrids differed significantly with respect to their capsaicinoids and antioxidant concentrations, but the results indicated that with the increase in storage temperature and time, a gradual and steady decrease in these levels was equally observed for all hybrids. Overall, mean concentrations after five months were significantly reduced by 22.6% for ascorbic acid, 19.0% for phenolic compounds, 17% for carotenoids and 12.7% for capsaicinoids. The trends of capsaicinoids and antioxidants evolution were decreasing gradually during storage until Day 150, this effect being more pronounced at higher temperature. Furthermore, the disappearance rates of capsaicinoids and antioxidants were higher in peppers packed in jute bags than in those wrapped with LDPE. In conclusion, despite the sensitivity of capsaicinoids and antioxidants to oxygen, light and moisture, the packaging in natural jute or synthetic LDPE plastic bags, as well as the storage at ambient temperature preserved between 77.4% and 87.3% of the initial amounts of these health- and nutrition-promoting compounds during five months’ storage. Full article
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