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Open AccessArticle

Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) G Protein Vaccines With Central Conserved Domain Mutations Induce CX3C-CX3CR1 Blocking Antibodies

1
Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30605, USA
2
Department of Biomolecular Engineering, University of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Craig McCormick
Viruses 2021, 13(2), 352; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020352
Received: 14 January 2021 / Revised: 4 February 2021 / Accepted: 19 February 2021 / Published: 23 February 2021
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection can cause bronchiolitis, pneumonia, morbidity, and some mortality, primarily in infants and the elderly, for which no vaccine is available. The RSV attachment (G) protein contains a central conserved domain (CCD) with a CX3C motif implicated in the induction of protective antibodies, thus vaccine candidates containing the G protein are of interest. This study determined if mutations in the G protein CCD would mediate immunogenicity while inducing G protein CX3C-CX3CR1 blocking antibodies. BALB/c mice were vaccinated with structurally-guided, rationally designed G proteins with CCD mutations. The results show that these G protein immunogens induce a substantial anti-G protein antibody response, and using serum IgG from the vaccinated mice, these antibodies are capable of blocking the RSV G protein CX3C-CX3CR1 binding while not interfering with CX3CL1, fractalkine. View Full-Text
Keywords: respiratory syncytial virus; RSV; vaccine; G protein; G glycoprotein; antibodies; CX3CR1 respiratory syncytial virus; RSV; vaccine; G protein; G glycoprotein; antibodies; CX3CR1
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bergeron, H.C.; Murray, J.; Nuñez Castrejon, A.M.; DuBois, R.M.; Tripp, R.A. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) G Protein Vaccines With Central Conserved Domain Mutations Induce CX3C-CX3CR1 Blocking Antibodies. Viruses 2021, 13, 352. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020352

AMA Style

Bergeron HC, Murray J, Nuñez Castrejon AM, DuBois RM, Tripp RA. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) G Protein Vaccines With Central Conserved Domain Mutations Induce CX3C-CX3CR1 Blocking Antibodies. Viruses. 2021; 13(2):352. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020352

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bergeron, Harrison C.; Murray, Jackelyn; Nuñez Castrejon, Ana M.; DuBois, Rebecca M.; Tripp, Ralph A. 2021. "Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) G Protein Vaccines With Central Conserved Domain Mutations Induce CX3C-CX3CR1 Blocking Antibodies" Viruses 13, no. 2: 352. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020352

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