Topic Editors

UNIPRO – Unidade de Investigação em Patologia e Reabilitação Oral, IUCS, CESPU, Rua Central de Gandra, 1317, 4585-116 Gandra PRD, Portugal
Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University, Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

Recent Advances in Anticancer Strategies

Abstract submission deadline
30 April 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
30 June 2024
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12328

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

The topic "Recent Advances in Anticancer Strategies" aims to provide an overview of the latest developments in the field of cancer treatment. Cancer remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and researchers have been working to develop more effective and targeted treatments to improve outcomes for patients. The existing cancer therapies suffer from severe side effects and drug resistance, leading to an increase in cancer incidence and mortality worldwide. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop and discover novel therapeutic strategies that can offer more effective and less toxic treatment options for cancer patients. Novel anticancer approaches are being developed, which can selectively identify and eliminate cancerous cells while minimizing harm to healthy tissues, unlike traditional therapies. For this topic, we welcome original articles and comprehensive reviews that showcase the latest advances in novel anticancer strategies with reduced toxicity and improved therapeutic indices. These articles can suggest potential prospects for optimizing cancer therapies with significant clinical value in the near future. We encourage submissions that focus on the development and validation of various anticancer approaches, including ligand-/receptor-based targeting, controlled drug delivery, gene therapy, gene delivery, immunotherapy, targeted anticancer prodrugs and conjugates (such as photoactivatable caged prodrugs, ADEPT, ADAPT and ADCs), magnetic and ultrasound-mediated drug targeting, and cancer stem cell therapy, as well as strategies that explore the targeting of signaling cascades and the tumor microenvironment. Overall, the topic aims at providing recent advances in anticancer strategies, highlighting the potential impact of these new approaches on cancer treatment and patient outcomes. We eagerly anticipate your valuable contribution to this exciting topic.

Dr. Hassan Bousbaa
Dr. Zhiwei Hu
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • anticancer strategies
  • cancer treatment
  • chemotherapy
  • radiation therapy
  • immunotherapy
  • targeted therapy
  • gene therapy
  • stem cell therapy
  • precision medicine
  • combination therapy
  • biomarkers
  • drug delivery
  • nanoparticles
  • CAR-T cell therapy
  • checkpoint inhibitors
  • epigenetic therapy
  • oncolytic viruses
  • artificial intelligence in cancer treatment

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Biomedicines
biomedicines
4.7 3.7 2013 15.4 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Cancers
cancers
5.2 7.4 2009 17.9 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Future Pharmacology
futurepharmacol
- - 2021 20.5 Days CHF 1000 Submit
Pharmaceutics
pharmaceutics
5.4 6.9 2009 14.2 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Current Oncology
curroncol
2.6 2.6 1994 18 Days CHF 2200 Submit

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Published Papers (10 papers)

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10 pages, 770 KiB  
Article
Prognostic Impact of Histologic Subtype and Divergent Differentiation in Patients with Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma Treated with Enfortumab Vedotin: A Multicenter Retrospective Study
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(2), 862-871; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31020064 - 03 Feb 2024
Viewed by 552
Abstract
Subtype of urothelial carcinoma (SUC), defined here as urothelial carcinoma with any histologic subtype or divergent differentiation, is a clinically aggressive disease. However, the efficacy of enfortumab vedotin (EV) against SUC remains unclear. Hence, this study aimed to assess the oncological outcomes of [...] Read more.
Subtype of urothelial carcinoma (SUC), defined here as urothelial carcinoma with any histologic subtype or divergent differentiation, is a clinically aggressive disease. However, the efficacy of enfortumab vedotin (EV) against SUC remains unclear. Hence, this study aimed to assess the oncological outcomes of patients with SUC treated with EV for metastatic disease. We retrospectively evaluated consecutive patients with advanced lower and upper urinary tract cancer who received EV after platinum-based chemotherapy and immune checkpoint blockade therapy at six institutions. The objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were compared between patients with pure urothelial carcinoma (PUC) and those with SUC. We identified 44 and 18 patients with PUC and SUC, respectively. Squamous differentiation was the most common subtype element, followed by glandular differentiation and sarcomatoid subtype. Although patients with SUC had a comparable ORR to those with PUC, the duration of response for SUC was short. Patients with SUC had poorer PFS than those with PUC; however, no significant difference was observed in OS. Multivariate analysis revealed that SUC was significantly associated with shorter PFS. Although the response of metastatic SUC to EV was similar to that of PUC, SUC showed faster progression than PUC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Recent Advances in Anticancer Strategies)
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21 pages, 4725 KiB  
Article
Maximizing Anticancer Response with MPS1 and CENPE Inhibition Alongside Apoptosis Induction
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(1), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16010056 - 29 Dec 2023
Viewed by 785
Abstract
Antimitotic compounds, targeting key spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) components (e.g., MPS1, Aurora kinase B, PLK1, KLP1, CENPE), are potential alternatives to microtubule-targeting antimitotic agents (e.g., paclitaxel) to circumvent resistance and side effects associated with their use. They can be classified into mitotic blockers, [...] Read more.
Antimitotic compounds, targeting key spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) components (e.g., MPS1, Aurora kinase B, PLK1, KLP1, CENPE), are potential alternatives to microtubule-targeting antimitotic agents (e.g., paclitaxel) to circumvent resistance and side effects associated with their use. They can be classified into mitotic blockers, causing SAC-induced mitotic arrest, or mitotic drivers, pushing cells through aberrant mitosis by overriding SAC. These drugs, although advancing to clinical trials, exhibit unsatisfactory cancer treatment outcomes as monotherapy, probably due to variable cell fate responses driven by cyclin B degradation and apoptosis signal accumulation networks. We investigated the impact of inhibiting anti-apoptotic signals with the BH3-mimetic navitoclax in lung cancer cells treated with the selective CENPE inhibitor GSK923295 (mitotic blocker) or the MPS1 inhibitor BAY1217389 (mitotic driver). Our aim was to steer treated cancer cells towards cell death. BH3-mimetics, in combination with both mitotic blockers and drivers, induced substantial cell death, mainly through apoptosis, in 2D and 3D cultures. Crucially, these synergistic concentrations were less toxic to non-tumor cells. This highlights the significance of combining BH3-mimetics with antimitotics, either blockers or drivers, which have reached the clinical trial phase, to enhance their effectiveness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Recent Advances in Anticancer Strategies)
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9 pages, 554 KiB  
Article
IGF1 and Insulin Receptor Single Nucleotide Variants Associated with Response in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with or without a Fasting Mimicking Diet (BOOG 2013-04 DIRECT Trial)
Cancers 2023, 15(24), 5872; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15245872 - 17 Dec 2023
Viewed by 645
Abstract
Aim: We aimed to investigate associations between IGF1R and INSR single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and clinical response in patients with breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without a fasting mimicking diet (FMD) from the DIRECT trial (NCT02126449), since insulin-like growth factor [...] Read more.
Aim: We aimed to investigate associations between IGF1R and INSR single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and clinical response in patients with breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without a fasting mimicking diet (FMD) from the DIRECT trial (NCT02126449), since insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and the insulin pathway are heavily involved in tumor growth and progression. Methods: Germline DNA from 113 patients was tested for 17 systematically selected candidate SNVs in IGF1R and INSR with pathological and radiological response. Results: IGF1R variants A > G (rs3743259) and G > A (rs3743258) are associated with worse pathological response compared to reference alleles p = 0.002, OR = 0.42 (95%CI: 0.24; 0.73); p = 0.0016; OR = 0.40 (95%CI: 0.23; 0.70). INSR T > C (rs1051690) may be associated with worse radiological response p = 0.02, OR = 2.92 (95%CI: 1.16; 7.36), although not significant after Bonferroni correction. Exploratory interaction analysis suggests that IGF1R SNVs rs2684787 and rs2654980 interact negatively with the FMD group regarding radiological response p = 0.036, OR = 5.13 (95%CI: 1.12; 23.63); p = 0.024, OR = 5.71 (95%CI: 1.26; 25.85). Conclusions: The IGF1R variants rs3743259 and rs3743258 are negatively associated with pathological response in this cohort, suggesting potential relevance as a predictive biomarker. Further research is needed to validate these findings and elucidate the underlying mechanisms and interaction with FMD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Recent Advances in Anticancer Strategies)
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14 pages, 656 KiB  
Systematic Review
Combination of Local Ablative Techniques with Radiotherapy for Primary and Recurrent Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review
Cancers 2023, 15(24), 5869; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15245869 - 16 Dec 2023
Viewed by 582
Abstract
In patients with early-stage or recurrent NSCLC who are unable to tolerate surgery, a benefit could derive only from a systemic therapy or another few forms of local therapy. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of radiotherapy [...] Read more.
In patients with early-stage or recurrent NSCLC who are unable to tolerate surgery, a benefit could derive only from a systemic therapy or another few forms of local therapy. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of radiotherapy combined with local ablative therapies in the treatment of primary and recurrent lung cancer in terms of toxicity profile and local control rate. Six studies featuring a total of 115 patients who met eligibility criteria and 119 lesions were included. Three studies evaluated lung cancer patients with a medically inoperable condition treated with image-guided local ablative therapies followed by radiotherapy: their local control rate (LC) ranged from 75% to 91.7% with only 15 patients (19.4%) reporting local recurrence after combined modality treatment. The other three studies provided a salvage option for patients with locally recurrent NSCLC after RT: the median follow-up period varied from 8.3 to 69.3 months with an LC rate ranging from 50% to 100%. The most common complications were radiation pneumonitis (9.5%) and pneumothorax (29.8%). The proposed intervention appears to be promising in terms of toxicity profile and local control rate. Further prospective studies are need to better delineate combining LTA-RT treatment benefits in this setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Recent Advances in Anticancer Strategies)
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18 pages, 1451 KiB  
Review
Navigating the Immune Maze: Pioneering Strategies for Unshackling Cancer Immunotherapy Resistance
Cancers 2023, 15(24), 5857; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15245857 - 15 Dec 2023
Viewed by 741
Abstract
Cancer immunotherapy has ushered in a transformative era in oncology, offering unprecedented promise and opportunities. Despite its remarkable breakthroughs, the field continues to grapple with the persistent challenge of treatment resistance. This resistance not only undermines the widespread efficacy of these pioneering treatments, [...] Read more.
Cancer immunotherapy has ushered in a transformative era in oncology, offering unprecedented promise and opportunities. Despite its remarkable breakthroughs, the field continues to grapple with the persistent challenge of treatment resistance. This resistance not only undermines the widespread efficacy of these pioneering treatments, but also underscores the pressing need for further research. Our exploration into the intricate realm of cancer immunotherapy resistance reveals various mechanisms at play, from primary and secondary resistance to the significant impact of genetic and epigenetic factors, as well as the crucial role of the tumor microenvironment (TME). Furthermore, we stress the importance of devising innovative strategies to counteract this resistance, such as employing combination therapies, tailoring immune checkpoints, and implementing real-time monitoring. By championing these state-of-the-art methods, we anticipate a paradigm that blends personalized healthcare with improved treatment options and is firmly committed to patient welfare. Through a comprehensive and multifaceted approach, we strive to tackle the challenges of resistance, aspiring to elevate cancer immunotherapy as a beacon of hope for patients around the world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Recent Advances in Anticancer Strategies)
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17 pages, 1471 KiB  
Review
Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Targeted Agents
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(12), 2763; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15122763 - 12 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1036
Abstract
Since their discovery, cancer stem cells have become a hot topic in cancer therapy research. These cells possess stem cell-like self-renewal and differentiation capacities and are important factors that dominate cancer metastasis, therapy-resistance and recurrence. Worse, their inherent characteristics make them difficult to [...] Read more.
Since their discovery, cancer stem cells have become a hot topic in cancer therapy research. These cells possess stem cell-like self-renewal and differentiation capacities and are important factors that dominate cancer metastasis, therapy-resistance and recurrence. Worse, their inherent characteristics make them difficult to eliminate. Colorectal cancer is the third-most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Targeting colorectal cancer stem cells (CR-CSCs) can inhibit colorectal cancer metastasis, enhance therapeutic efficacy and reduce recurrence. Here, we introduced the origin, biomarker proteins, identification, cultivation and research techniques of CR-CSCs, and we summarized the signaling pathways that regulate the stemness of CR-CSCs, such as Wnt, JAK/STAT3, Notch and Hh signaling pathway. In addition to these, we also reviewed recent anti-CR-CSC drugs targeting signaling pathways, biomarkers and other regulators. These will help researchers gain insight into the current agents targeting to CR-CSCs, explore new cancer drugs and propose potential therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Recent Advances in Anticancer Strategies)
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29 pages, 2646 KiB  
Review
Targeting Glucose Metabolism in Cancer Cells as an Approach to Overcoming Drug Resistance
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(11), 2610; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15112610 - 10 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1584
Abstract
The “Warburg effect” consists of a metabolic shift in energy production from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The continuous activation of glycolysis in cancer cells causes rapid energy production and an increase in lactate, leading to the acidification of the tumour microenvironment, chemo- and [...] Read more.
The “Warburg effect” consists of a metabolic shift in energy production from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The continuous activation of glycolysis in cancer cells causes rapid energy production and an increase in lactate, leading to the acidification of the tumour microenvironment, chemo- and radioresistance, as well as poor patient survival. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial metabolism can be also involved in aggressive cancer characteristics. The metabolic differences between cancer and normal tissues can be considered the Achilles heel of cancer, offering a strategy for new therapies. One of the main causes of treatment resistance consists of the increased expression of efflux pumps, and multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins, which are able to export chemotherapeutics out of the cell. Cells expressing MDR proteins require ATP to mediate the efflux of their drug substrates. Thus, inhibition of the main energy-producing pathways in cancer cells, not only induces cancer cell death per se, but also overcomes multidrug resistance. Given that most anticancer drugs do not have the ability to distinguish normal cells from cancer cells, a number of drug delivery systems have been developed. These nanodrug delivery systems provide flexible and effective methods to overcome MDR by facilitating cellular uptake, increasing drug accumulation, reducing drug efflux, improving targeted drug delivery, co-administering synergistic agents, and increasing the half-life of drugs in circulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Recent Advances in Anticancer Strategies)
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20 pages, 2401 KiB  
Review
The Value of Microbes in Cancer Neoantigen Immunotherapy
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(8), 2138; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15082138 - 14 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1135
Abstract
Tumor neoantigens are widely used in cancer immunotherapy, and a growing body of research suggests that microbes play an important role in these neoantigen-based immunotherapeutic processes. The human body and its surrounding environment are filled with a large number of microbes that are [...] Read more.
Tumor neoantigens are widely used in cancer immunotherapy, and a growing body of research suggests that microbes play an important role in these neoantigen-based immunotherapeutic processes. The human body and its surrounding environment are filled with a large number of microbes that are in long-term interaction with the organism. The microbiota can modulate our immune system, help activate neoantigen-reactive T cells, and play a great role in the process of targeting tumor neoantigens for therapy. Recent studies have revealed the interconnection between microbes and neoantigens, which can cross-react with each other through molecular mimicry, providing theoretical guidance for more relevant studies. The current applications of microbes in immunotherapy against tumor neoantigens are mainly focused on cancer vaccine development and immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors. This article summarizes the related fields and suggests the importance of microbes in immunotherapy against neoantigens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Recent Advances in Anticancer Strategies)
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44 pages, 2410 KiB  
Review
The Neurodevelopmental and Molecular Landscape of Medulloblastoma Subgroups: Current Targets and the Potential for Combined Therapies
Cancers 2023, 15(15), 3889; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15153889 - 30 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1830
Abstract
Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population. Despite the use of multiple therapeutic approaches consisting of surgical resection, craniospinal irradiation, and multiagent chemotherapy, the prognosis of many patients with [...] Read more.
Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population. Despite the use of multiple therapeutic approaches consisting of surgical resection, craniospinal irradiation, and multiagent chemotherapy, the prognosis of many patients with medulloblastoma remains dismal. Additionally, the high doses of radiation and the chemotherapeutic agents used are associated with significant short- and long-term complications and adverse effects, most notably neurocognitive delay. Hence, there is an urgent need for the development and clinical integration of targeted treatment regimens with greater efficacy and superior safety profiles. Since the adoption of the molecular-based classification of medulloblastoma into wingless (WNT) activated, sonic hedgehog (SHH) activated, group 3, and group 4, research efforts have been directed towards unraveling the genetic, epigenetic, transcriptomic, and proteomic profiles of each subtype. This review aims to delineate the progress that has been made in characterizing the neurodevelopmental and molecular features of each medulloblastoma subtype. It further delves into the implications that these characteristics have on the development of subgroup-specific targeted therapeutic agents. Furthermore, it highlights potential future avenues for combining multiple agents or strategies in order to obtain augmented effects and evade the development of treatment resistance in tumors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Recent Advances in Anticancer Strategies)
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16 pages, 1760 KiB  
Review
FLASH Radiotherapy and the Use of Radiation Dosimeters
Cancers 2023, 15(15), 3883; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15153883 - 30 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1739
Abstract
Radiotherapy (RT) using ultra-high dose rate (UHDR) radiation, known as FLASH RT, has shown promising results in reducing normal tissue toxicity while maintaining tumor control. However, implementing FLASH RT in clinical settings presents technical challenges, including limited depth penetration and complex treatment planning. [...] Read more.
Radiotherapy (RT) using ultra-high dose rate (UHDR) radiation, known as FLASH RT, has shown promising results in reducing normal tissue toxicity while maintaining tumor control. However, implementing FLASH RT in clinical settings presents technical challenges, including limited depth penetration and complex treatment planning. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is a valuable tool for dose calculation in RT and has been investigated for optimizing FLASH RT. Various MC codes, such as EGSnrc, DOSXYZnrc, and Geant4, have been used to simulate dose distributions and optimize treatment plans. Accurate dosimetry is essential for FLASH RT, and radiation detectors play a crucial role in measuring dose delivery. Solid-state detectors, including diamond detectors such as microDiamond, have demonstrated linear responses and good agreement with reference detectors in UHDR and ultra-high dose per pulse (UHDPP) ranges. Ionization chambers are commonly used for dose measurement, and advancements have been made to address their response nonlinearities at UHDPP. Studies have proposed new calculation methods and empirical models for ion recombination in ionization chambers to improve their accuracy in FLASH RT. Additionally, strip-segmented ionization chamber arrays have shown potential for the experimental measurement of dose rate distribution in proton pencil beam scanning. Radiochromic films, such as GafchromicTM EBT3, have been used for absolute dose measurement and to validate MC simulation results in high-energy X-rays, triggering the FLASH effect. These films have been utilized to characterize ionization chambers and measure off-axis and depth dose distributions in FLASH RT. In conclusion, MC simulation provides accurate dose calculation and optimization for FLASH RT, while radiation detectors, including diamond detectors, ionization chambers, and radiochromic films, offer valuable tools for dosimetry in UHDR environments. Further research is needed to refine treatment planning techniques and improve detector performance to facilitate the widespread implementation of FLASH RT, potentially revolutionizing cancer treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Recent Advances in Anticancer Strategies)
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