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Special Issue "Feline Viruses and Viral Diseases"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Viruses".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Julia A. Beatty

Sydney School of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: companion animal tumour virology; virus discovery; pathogenesis of chronic viral infections; feline retroviruses; feline gammaherpesviruses; feline hepadnavirus
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Katrin Hartmann

Medizinischen Kleintierklinik, Centre of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, LMU Munich, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: infectious diseases in cats and dogs, specifically feline virus infections, leptospirosis, and canine vector-borne diseases as well as antiviral chemotherapy and vaccination/protection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The spectrum of feline disease syndromes linked to known or novel viruses is expanding. Understanding host–virus–environment interactions in domestic cats serves not just the welfare of this popular human companion but also that of susceptible sympatric felids, while providing insights into some human diseases.

Contemporary feline virology is underpinned by the discoveries of classical virologists, who likely never dreamed of high-throughput sequencing platforms. Such capabilities bring with them the imperative to nurture multidisciplinary approaches to make biological sense of the feline virome. Recently discovered homologues of human pathogens include feline morbilliviruses, a domestic cat hepadnavirus and a feline gammaherpesvirus. Working together, veterinary diagnosticians, epidemiologists, pathologists, molecular virologists, bioinformaticians, immunologists, and others will advance our understanding of whether, and under what circumstances, these and other novel viruses might act as feline pathogens, passengers, or symbionts.

Perplexing problems surrounding known feline viruses include triggers for the development of fatal feline infectious peritonitis, the re-emergence of feline panleukopenia virus, determinants of virulence among strains of feline calicivirus that cause virulent-systemic disease, the role of papillomaviruses in squamous cell carcinoma, the significance of regressive feline leukaemia virus for feline health, and many more.

Submissions are invited from researchers working in fields related to viruses and viral diseases of domestic cats and non-domestic felids. Studies that develop or envisage translational applications promoting feline health are particularly welcome.

Prof. Julia A. Beatty
Prof. Dr. Katrin Hartmann
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions. The editorial office is happy to offer 50% discount to the first 6 articles that are accepted for publication in this special issue.

Keywords

  • feline
  • cat
  • virus
  • pathogenesis
  • disease

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Diagnosis of Feline Leukaemia Virus (FeLV) Infection in Owned and Group-Housed Rescue Cats in Australia
Viruses 2019, 11(6), 503; https://doi.org/10.3390/v11060503
Received: 24 April 2019 / Revised: 21 May 2019 / Accepted: 29 May 2019 / Published: 31 May 2019
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Abstract
A field study was undertaken to (i) measure the prevalence of feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) exposure and FeLV infection in a cross-section of healthy Australian pet cats; and (ii) investigate the outcomes following natural FeLV exposure in two Australian rescue facilities. Group 1 [...] Read more.
A field study was undertaken to (i) measure the prevalence of feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) exposure and FeLV infection in a cross-section of healthy Australian pet cats; and (ii) investigate the outcomes following natural FeLV exposure in two Australian rescue facilities. Group 1 (n = 440) consisted of healthy client-owned cats with outdoor access, predominantly from eastern Australia. Groups 2 (n = 38) and 3 (n = 51) consisted of a mixture of healthy and sick cats, group-housed in two separate rescue facilities in Sydney, Australia, tested following identification of index cases of FeLV infection in cats sourced from these facilities. Diagnostic testing for FeLV exposure/infection included p27 antigen testing using three different point-of-care FeLV kits and a laboratory-based ELISA, real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) testing to detect FeLV proviral DNA in leukocytes, real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) testing to detect FeLV RNA in plasma, and neutralising antibody (NAb) testing. Cats were classified as FeLV-uninfected (FeLV-unexposed and presumptively FeLV-abortive infections) or FeLV-infected (presumptively regressive and presumptively progressive infections). In Group 1, 370 FeLV-unexposed cats (370/440, 84%), 47 abortive infections (47/440, 11%), nine regressive infections (9/440, 2%), and two progressive infections (2/440, 0.5%) were identified, and 12 FeLV-uninfected cats (12/440, 3%) were unclassifiable as FeLV-unexposed or abortive infections due to insufficient samples available for NAb testing. In Groups 2 and 3, 31 FeLV-unexposed cats (31/89, 35%), eight abortive infections (8/89, 9%), 22 regressive infections (22/89; 25%), and 19 progressive infections (19/89; 21%) were discovered, and nine FeLV-uninfected cats (9/89; 10%) were unclassifiable due to insufficient samples available for NAb testing. One of the presumptively progressively-infected cats in Group 3 was likely a focal FeLV infection. Two other presumptively progressively-infected cats in Group 3 may have been classified as regressive infections with repeated testing, highlighting the difficulties associated with FeLV diagnosis when sampling cats at a single time point, even with results from a panel of FeLV tests. These results serve as a reminder to Australian veterinarians that the threat of FeLV to the general pet cat population remains high, thus vigilant FeLV testing, separate housing for FeLV-infected cats, and FeLV vaccination of at-risk cats is important, particularly in group-housed cats in shelters and rescue facilities, where outbreaks of FeLV infection can occur. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feline Viruses and Viral Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle
Identification of a Novel Gammaherpesvirus in Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis)
Viruses 2019, 11(4), 363; https://doi.org/10.3390/v11040363
Received: 27 March 2019 / Revised: 15 April 2019 / Accepted: 17 April 2019 / Published: 20 April 2019
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Abstract
Gammaherpesviruses (GHVs) infect many animal species and are associated with lymphoproliferative disorders in some. Previously, we identified several novel GHVs in North American felids; however, a GHV had never been identified in Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis). We, therefore, hypothesized the existence [...] Read more.
Gammaherpesviruses (GHVs) infect many animal species and are associated with lymphoproliferative disorders in some. Previously, we identified several novel GHVs in North American felids; however, a GHV had never been identified in Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis). We, therefore, hypothesized the existence of an unidentified GHV in lynx. Using degenerate nested and subsequently virus-specific PCR, we amplified and sequenced 3.4 kb of DNA from a novel GHV in lynx, which we named Lynx canadensis gammaherpesvirus 1 (LcaGHV1). Phylogenetic analysis determined that LcaGHV1 is a distinct GHV species belonging to the genus Percavirus. We then estimated the prevalence of LcaGHV1 in lynx by developing a PCR-based assay and detected LcaGHV1 DNA in 36% (95% CI: 22–53%) of lynx spleen DNA samples from Maine, USA and 17% (95% CI: 8–31%) from Newfoundland, Canada. The LcaGHV1 DNA sequences from Maine and Newfoundland lynx were nearly identical to each other (two nucleotide substitutions in 3.4 kb), suggesting that the unique lynx subspecies present on the island of Newfoundland (Lynx canadensis subsolanus) is infected with virus that very closely resembles virus found in mainland lynx. The potential ecologic and pathologic consequences of this novel virus for Canada lynx populations warrant further study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feline Viruses and Viral Diseases)
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