Peptide-Based Vaccines against Infectious Diseases and Cancer

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 4007

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Interests: peptide-based vaccines; gene delivery; medicinal chemistry; organic synthesis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Interests: peptides; subunit vaccines; vaccine development; infectious diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
Interests: vaccines and nanomedicine; vaccine design; nanotechnology; peptide chemistry; medicinal chemistry; vaccine/drug delivery; antimicrobial agents; macromolecules; adjuvants; immunology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Vaccination is one of the most successful tools for reducing the incidence of infectious diseases. Peptide-based subunit vaccines have emerged as promising prophylactic and therapeutic medication against several infectious diseases including group A streptococcus, malaria, TB, and cancer. Peptide-subunit-based vaccines contain only the minimal immunogenic region of an antigen necessary to elicit the desired immune response. Therefore, only safe and effective epitopes can be selected, removing the risk of allergic and autoimmune responses. However, peptides do not contain the danger signals that are needed to activate the immune system. Thus, an adjuvant/delivery system must be included to stimulate an immune response against the peptide antigen.

Dr. Waleed Hussein
Dr. Rachel Stephenson
Dr. Mariusz Skwarczynski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • peptide-based vaccine
  • infectious Diseases
  • prophylactic vaccines
  • therapeutic vaccines
  • cancer
  • vaccine formulations
  • adjuvants

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

17 pages, 1612 KiB  
Review
Peptide-Based Vaccines in Clinical Phases and New Potential Therapeutic Targets as a New Approach for Breast Cancer: A Review
by María Lilia Nicolás-Morales, Arianna Luisa-Sanjuan, Mayralina Gutiérrez-Torres, Amalia Vences-Velázquez, Carlos Ortuño-Pineda, Mónica Espinoza-Rojo, Napoleón Navarro-Tito and Karen Cortés-Sarabia
Vaccines 2022, 10(8), 1249; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10081249 - 3 Aug 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3194
Abstract
Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women from 20 to 59 years old. The conventional treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and immunotherapy. This immunotherapy is based on administering monoclonal therapeutic antibodies (passive) or vaccines (active) with therapeutic purposes. Several [...] Read more.
Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women from 20 to 59 years old. The conventional treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and immunotherapy. This immunotherapy is based on administering monoclonal therapeutic antibodies (passive) or vaccines (active) with therapeutic purposes. Several types of vaccines could be used as potential treatments for cancer, including whole-cell, DNA, RNA, and peptide-based vaccines. Peptides used to develop vaccines are derived from tumor-associated antigens or tumor-specific antigens, such as HER-2, MUC1, ErbB2, CEA, FRα, MAGE A1, A3, and A10, NY-ESO-1, among others. Peptide-based vaccines provide some advantages, such as low cost, purity of the antigen, and the induction of humoral and cellular immune response. In this review, we explore the different types of vaccines against breast cancer with a specific focus on the description of peptide-based vaccines, their composition, immune response induction, and the description of new potential therapeutic targets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Peptide-Based Vaccines against Infectious Diseases and Cancer)
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