New Vaccine Technologies and Approaches

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019) | Viewed by 15259

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Bedford Park 5046, Australia
Interests: developed vaccines against influenza; hepatitis B; sting allergy; malaria; Japanese encephalitis; rabies and HIV
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Flinders Medical Centre (6D:309), Government of South Austrlia, Bedford Park 5042, Australia
Interests: human DNA vaccine design and development; human B cell responses to immunisations; mechanisms of vaccine adjuvants; signalling pathways of innate immunity and insulin signalling; non-coding RNA and functions; chromatin biology and epigenetics; transcriptional regulation and protein modifications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This edition is aimed at presenting the latest research on new vaccine technologies and approaches on:

vaccines
adjuvants
delivery devices
nanoparticles viral vectors
DNA vaccines
genetic adjuvants

Prof. Nikolai Petrovsky
Dr. Lei Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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22 pages, 5518 KiB  
Article
Investigating Prime-Pull Vaccination through a Combination of Parenteral Vaccination and Intranasal Boosting
by Carla B. Roces, Maryam T. Hussain, Signe T. Schmidt, Dennis Christensen and Yvonne Perrie
Vaccines 2020, 8(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8010010 - 31 Dec 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 5578
Abstract
Formulation of inhalable delivery systems containing tuberculosis (TB) antigens to target the site of infection (lungs) have been considered for the development of subunit vaccines. Inert delivery systems such as poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) are an interesting approach due to its approval for [...] Read more.
Formulation of inhalable delivery systems containing tuberculosis (TB) antigens to target the site of infection (lungs) have been considered for the development of subunit vaccines. Inert delivery systems such as poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) are an interesting approach due to its approval for human use. However, PLGA suffers hydrolytic degradation when stored in a liquid environment for prolonged time. Therefore, in this study, nano- and microparticles composed of different PLGA copolymers (50:50, 75:25 and 85:15), sucrose (10% w/v) and L-leucine (1% w/v) encapsulating H56 TB vaccine candidate were produced as dried powders. In vitro studies in three macrophage cell lines (MH-S, RAW264.7 and THP-1) showed the ability of these cells to take up the formulated PLGA:H56 particles and process the antigen. An in vivo prime-pull immunisation approach consisting of priming with CAF01:H56 (2 × subcutaneous (s.c.) injection) followed by a mucosal boost with PLGA:H56 (intranasal (i.n.) administration) demonstrated the retention of the immunogenicity of the antigen encapsulated within the lyophilised PLGA delivery system, although no enhancing effect could be observed compared to the administration of antigen alone as a boost. The work here could provide the foundations for the scale independent manufacture of polymer delivery systems encapsulating antigens for inhalation/aerolisation to the lungs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Vaccine Technologies and Approaches)
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23 pages, 316 KiB  
Review
Development of Next Generation Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccines Conferring Broad Protection
by Malihe Masomian, Zuleeza Ahmad, Lai Ti Gew and Chit Laa Poh
Vaccines 2020, 8(1), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8010132 - 17 Mar 2020
Cited by 97 | Viewed by 9251
Abstract
Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen causing pneumonia with over 2 million deaths annually, especially in young children and the elderly. To date, at least 98 different pneumococcal capsular serotypes have been identified. Currently, the vaccines for prevention of S. pneumoniae infections are [...] Read more.
Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen causing pneumonia with over 2 million deaths annually, especially in young children and the elderly. To date, at least 98 different pneumococcal capsular serotypes have been identified. Currently, the vaccines for prevention of S. pneumoniae infections are the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide-based vaccine (PPV23) and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV10 and PCV13). These vaccines only cover some pneumococcal serotypes and are unable to protect against non-vaccine serotypes and unencapsulated S. pneumoniae. This has led to a rapid increase in antibiotic-resistant non-vaccine serotypes. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop new, effective, and affordable pneumococcal vaccines, which could cover a wide range of serotypes. This review discusses the new approaches to develop effective vaccines with broad serotype coverage as well as recent development of promising pneumococcal vaccines in clinical trials. New vaccine candidates are the inactivated whole-cell vaccine strain (Δpep27ΔcomD mutant) constructed by mutations of specific genes and several protein-based S. pneumoniae vaccines using conserved pneumococcal antigens, such as lipoprotein and surface-exposed protein (PspA). Among the vaccines in Phase 3 clinical trials are the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, PCV-15 (V114) and 20vPnC. The inactivated whole-cell and several protein-based vaccines are either in Phase 1 or 2 trials. Furthermore, the recent progress of nanoparticles that play important roles as delivery systems and adjuvants to improve the performance, as well as the immunogenicity of the nanovaccines, are reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Vaccine Technologies and Approaches)
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