Special Issue "Immune Modulating Therapeutics for Cancer Immunotherapy & Vaccination"

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022 | Viewed by 1132

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kuo-Ching Mei
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
Interests: immunogenic cell death; immunoengineering; chemotherapy; immunotherapy; tumor microenvironment; drug delivery; nanomedicine; bioengineering; biomaterial; liposomes; exsosomes
Dr. Tian Xia
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
David Geffen School of Meidicne, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 94607, USA
Interests: vaccine; toxicity; high throuput screening; nanomedicine; biomaterials; immune modulation; antigen; epitope; allergy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are launching an exciting Special Issue on Immune Modulating Therapeutics for Cancer Immunotherapy & Vaccination. This Special Issue aims to collect original research and review articles on recent developments in the rapidly developing immune engineering field, focusing on immune-modulating therapeutics to empower cancer vaccination and immunotherapy. We are pleased to invite you to contribute to one of the broad topics that synergize the focus of this special issue, e.g., ways to increase cancer immunogenicity (with chemotherapeutics, PDT, radiation, or natural products etc.), novel vaccines to establish long-term anti-cancer immunity, strategies to overcome tumor immune suppression, CAR-T/NK therapeutics, novel antibody therapeutics, immune-modulating drug targets and drug discovery, methods to profile patient biopsy for personalized combinational immunotherapy, and other novel interventions, broadly defined. Thank you, and I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Kuo-Ching Mei
Dr. Tian Xia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tumor microenvironment
  • immune checkpoint
  • cancer vaccine
  • immunogenic cell death
  • drug delivery
  • nanomedicine
  • immune modulation
  • immunoengineering
  • cell-based therapy
  • immune supression

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
Targeting Membrane Trafficking as a Strategy for Cancer Treatment
Vaccines 2022, 10(5), 790; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10050790 - 17 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 808
Abstract
Membrane trafficking is emerging as an attractive therapeutic strategy for cancer. Recent reports have found a connection between Wnt signaling, receptor-mediated endocytosis, V-ATPase, lysosomal activity, and macropinocytosis through the canonical Wnt pathway. In macropinocytic cells, a massive internalization of the plasma membrane can [...] Read more.
Membrane trafficking is emerging as an attractive therapeutic strategy for cancer. Recent reports have found a connection between Wnt signaling, receptor-mediated endocytosis, V-ATPase, lysosomal activity, and macropinocytosis through the canonical Wnt pathway. In macropinocytic cells, a massive internalization of the plasma membrane can lead to the loss of cell-surface cadherins, integrins, and other antigens that mediate cell–cell adhesion, favoring an invasive phenotype. V-ATPase is a key regulator in maintaining proper membrane trafficking, homeostasis, and the earliest developmental decisions in the Xenopus vertebrate development model system. Here, we review how the interference of membrane trafficking with membrane trafficking inhibitors might be clinically relevant in humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immune Modulating Therapeutics for Cancer Immunotherapy & Vaccination)
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