Special Issue "Mediatization of Religion: Boundaries between the Religion of the Intimate Sphere and the Religion of the Public Sphere"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Stefan Bratosin
Website
Guest Editor
IARSIC-CORHIS, Paul Valéry University of Montpellier 3, Route de Mende 34199 cedex 5, France
Interests: (emerging) media and religion, mediatization and mediation, public sphere, spirituality, liberty of religion, secularity and religious organizations and institutions, symbolic forms within semi-closed organizations/institutions, French concertation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Religion is an individual and collective space, both public and intimate (Sennett, 1979; Amiraux, 2018). Most researchers (Tzuriel, 1984; Ebstyne King, 2003; Marcia, 2002; Oppong, 2013) tackling the question of religion and religious identity agree that there is a moving frontier that separates and organizes the places of passage between the space of religion (intimate) and public space, especially when it comes to mediatized public sphere (Hoover, 2003; Lövheim, 2013). Indeed, the current context of the digital media involves a permanent redefinition of public and intimate spaces, resulting in the reduction of the intimate space. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc. tend to impose the intimate/private as social realities with an individual responsibility to defend the private. The public-private relationship is thus modified. It becomes an imperative to change the media, political, public, societal, etc. approach of religion as a public-private space. The media visibility of the private sphere, which has modified our understanding of the private sphere, defines in a different manner the public-private relationship by creating spaces that are both public and private (Papacharissi, 2010).

This Special Issue aims to contribute to a field under construction on the (new) relations between religion and the media (mainstream and new) with public and private spheres. Many paths and issues are envisaged. In the context of the mediatization of everything (Livingstone, 2009; Bratosin, 2016a), does religion preserve the character of an intimate space? When considering religion in institutionalized social spaces such as domestic space, organizational space, and public space (Bratosin, 2014; Bratosin 2016b) is religious representation the major symbolic tool used by human kind to distinguish between those who have power and those who do not have it, whether in the public or in the private spheres? Is there a mutual exclusion of the public sphere and the ecclesia, when the historical-theoretical coincidence of the public sphere and the ecclesia is undeniable? Is the hypothesis of a post-secular society insufficient to "reconcile" religion with public and intimate spaces within the framework of the mediatization of the religious? Does the public/private distinction really separate religion from the mediatized public sphere, thus creating a privatized religion? Could the natural existence of a private religious sphere and a public secular sphere be taken for granted through the prism of media hegemony?

This thematic issue is also open to other questions that would bring theoretical, empirical proposals, and cases studies likely to advance research in this field.

Prof. Dr. Stefan Bratosin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • mediatization
  • religion
  • public sphere
  • intimate sphere
  • power
  • emerging media

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Mediatization of Beliefs: The Adventism from “Morning Star” to the Public Sphere
Religions 2020, 11(10), 483; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11100483 - 24 Sep 2020
Abstract
This article examines “the material becoming-forces of symbolic forms” mobilized by the Adventist beliefs in the public sphere of the United States of America during the 19th century. Particularly, the article focuses on the “transformation” of the prophetic letter’s secret of the Bible [...] Read more.
This article examines “the material becoming-forces of symbolic forms” mobilized by the Adventist beliefs in the public sphere of the United States of America during the 19th century. Particularly, the article focuses on the “transformation” of the prophetic letter’s secret of the Bible into “communicative action”, which is both civil and religious. The article aims to test the strengths and the weaknesses of Adventism’s symbolic function in the paradigmatic myth of the State, on the assumption that, in the creation of spiritual meaning in the present world, Adventism is an external referent to social transformation. Theoretical and exploratory in nature, this article also seeks to broaden the understanding of an atypical religion—“without particular religion”—through the old and the new media theory and research program of mediatization. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Mediatization of Religion: Three Dimensions from a Latin American/Brazilian Perspective
Religions 2020, 11(10), 482; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11100482 - 24 Sep 2020
Abstract
Research on the mediatization of religion seems to have become a major issue both for Social Sciences and Media Studies, although some core questions concerning its definitions and characteristics are still open to debate. This paper addresses some of these interrogations from a [...] Read more.
Research on the mediatization of religion seems to have become a major issue both for Social Sciences and Media Studies, although some core questions concerning its definitions and characteristics are still open to debate. This paper addresses some of these interrogations from a Latin American/Brazilian perspective, taking into the account some of the particular perspectives of the region. It draws on previous studies, combined with contemporary cases, to outline an overview of mediatization, as it has been studied by some Latin American scholars, in three dimensions: (1) Theoretical: Mediatization as an alternative path to ‘media and religion’ studies by focusing on the articulation between the media environment and religious practices, both institutional and individual; (2) cultural: Mediatization has drawn religion closer to media culture and entertainment, which has allowed churches and denominations to reach a wider audience; and (3) political: Mediatization has enabled religion to get a broader visibility in the public space and to have a say in social matters. These elements lead to the suggestion that mediatization of religion is a new way of living the religious experience in everyday life. Full article
Open AccessArticle
The Mediatization of Camino De Santiago: Between the Pilgrimage Narrative and Media Circulation of the Narrative
Religions 2020, 11(10), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11100480 - 23 Sep 2020
Abstract
In this article, we seek to analyze the mediatization of pilgrims’ narratives on Camino de Santiago. Centuries ago, pilgrims were deprived of contact with their homes for extended periods. The narrative of the experience was only shared with their loved ones once they [...] Read more.
In this article, we seek to analyze the mediatization of pilgrims’ narratives on Camino de Santiago. Centuries ago, pilgrims were deprived of contact with their homes for extended periods. The narrative of the experience was only shared with their loved ones once they had arrived home. In the 20th century, landline telephones, computers connected to the Internet, and smartphones gradually reduced the time necessary to share these stories with the outside world. Upon analyzing pilgrimage narratives published on the Internet (Facebook, blogs), we observe that the intimate experience of pilgrims has become a media product that, when circulated, interferes in both the storytelling and the actual pilgrimage experience. Full article
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