Novel Technological Approaches for Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Targeting and Design".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2024) | Viewed by 5078

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, University of Genoa, Viale Cembrano 4, 16148 Genoa, Italy
Interests: drug delivery systems; nanocarriers; targeting; inflammation; cancer; biomimetic vesicles; hydrogels
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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, University of Genoa, Viale Cembrano 4, 16148 Genoa, Italy
Interests: controlled drug release; hydrogels; drug targeting; biocompatible polymers

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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, University of Genoa, Viale Cembrano 4, 16148 Genoa, Italy
Interests: drug delivery systems; nanocarriers; targeting; inflammation; cancer; biomimetic vesicles

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Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa, Italy
Interests: biointerfaces; DNA sensors; surface adsorption; fluorescence; XPS; AFM

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The search for new drug delivery strategies is increasingly directed towards the development of targeted systems that are able to reach a specific organ, tissue or intracellular organelle and limit the possible adverse effects of active diseases. These systems might be useful for both the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, with a strong impact on public health and society, particularly in relation to—but not limited to—cancer. A very interesting approach is the development of theranostic systems which can lead to the simultaneous detection of the diseased area and provide delivery of the therapeutic active drug. Among the possible strategies that could be used to achieve a targeted drug delivery is the development of drug conjugates and microparticulate and nanoparticulate systems (such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, inorganic nanoparticles and many others) which can be decorated with a variety of targeting moieties. Moreover, the field of extracellular vesicles and biomimetic vesicles, endowed with homing abilities, is currently gaining increasing attention.

We are pleased to invite academics and pharmaceutical researchers to bring their new insights into the development of innovative diagnostic and therapeutic targeted drug delivery systems.

This Special Issue aims to collect the most recent and innovative drug delivery systems able to specifically target the diseased tissue, with a special focus on the technological aspects underlining the development of such systems.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but not limited to) the following:

  • Drug targeting;
  • Nanomedicine;
  • Pharmaceutical formulation;
  • Precision medicine;
  • Imaging;
  • Theranostics;
  • Radiopharmacy.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Gabriele Caviglioli
Dr. Sara Baldassari
Dr. Giorgia Ailuno
Dr. Paolo Canepa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • targeting
  • nanoparticles
  • drug delivery systems
  • cancer
  • theranostics
  • biomimetic vesicles
  • drug conjugates

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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22 pages, 8785 KiB  
Article
Development of Biotinylated Liposomes Encapsulating Metformin for Therapeutic Targeting of Inflammation-Based Diseases
by Giorgia Ailuno, Sara Baldassari, Alice Balboni, Sara Pastorino, Guendalina Zuccari, Katia Cortese, Federica Barbieri, Giuliana Drava, Tullio Florio and Gabriele Caviglioli
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(2), 235; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16020235 - 5 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1063
Abstract
Inflammation is a physiological response to a damaging stimulus but sometimes can be the cause of the onset of neurodegenerative diseases, atherosclerosis, and cancer. These pathologies are characterized by the overexpression of inflammatory markers like endothelial adhesion molecules, such as Vascular Cell Adhesion [...] Read more.
Inflammation is a physiological response to a damaging stimulus but sometimes can be the cause of the onset of neurodegenerative diseases, atherosclerosis, and cancer. These pathologies are characterized by the overexpression of inflammatory markers like endothelial adhesion molecules, such as Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1). In the present work, the development of liposomes for therapeutic targeted delivery to inflamed endothelia is described. The idea is to exploit a three-step pretargeting system based on the biotin–avidin high-affinity interaction: the first step involves a previously described biotin derivative bearing a VCAM-1 binding peptide; in the second step, the avidin derivative NeutrAvidinTM, which strongly binds to the biotin moiety, is injected; the final step is the administration of biotinylated liposomes that would bind to NeutravidinTM immobilized onto VCAM-1 overexpressing endothelium. Stealth biotinylated liposomes, prepared via the thin film hydration method followed by extrusion and purification via size exclusion chromatography, have been thoroughly characterized for their chemico-physical and morphological features and loaded with metformin hydrochloride, a potential anti-inflammatory agent. The three-step system, tested in vitro on different cell lines via confocal microscopy, FACS analysis and metformin uptake, has proved its suitability for therapeutic applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Technological Approaches for Targeted Drug Delivery Systems)
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Review

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39 pages, 1216 KiB  
Review
Aptamers for the Delivery of Plant-Based Compounds: A Review
by Joana Gamboa, Pedro Lourenço, Carla Cruz and Eugenia Gallardo
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(4), 541; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16040541 - 14 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1431
Abstract
Natural compounds have a high potential for the treatment of various conditions, including infections, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. However, they usually present poor pharmacokinetics, low specificity, and even toxicity, which limits their use. Therefore, targeted drug delivery systems, typically composed of a carrier [...] Read more.
Natural compounds have a high potential for the treatment of various conditions, including infections, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. However, they usually present poor pharmacokinetics, low specificity, and even toxicity, which limits their use. Therefore, targeted drug delivery systems, typically composed of a carrier and a targeting ligand, can enhance natural product selectivity and effectiveness. Notably, aptamers—short RNA or single-stranded DNA molecules—have gained attention as promising ligands in targeted drug delivery since they are simple to synthesize and modify, and they present high tissue permeability, stability, and a wide array of available targets. The combination of natural products, namely plant-based compounds, with a drug delivery system utilizing aptamers as targeting agents represents an emerging strategy that has the potential to broaden its applications. This review discusses the potential of aptamers as targeting agents in the delivery of natural compounds, as well as new trends and developments in their utilization in the field of medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Technological Approaches for Targeted Drug Delivery Systems)
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28 pages, 8810 KiB  
Review
Exploring the Microfluidic Production of Biomimetic Hybrid Nanoparticles and Their Pharmaceutical Applications
by Dafina Fondaj, Ilaria Arduino, Angela Assunta Lopedota, Nunzio Denora and Rosa Maria Iacobazzi
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(7), 1953; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15071953 - 14 Jul 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1906
Abstract
Nanomedicines have made remarkable advances in recent years, addressing the limitations of traditional therapy and treatment methods. Due to their improved drug solubility, stability, precise delivery, and ability to target specific sites, nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems have emerged as highly promising solutions. The [...] Read more.
Nanomedicines have made remarkable advances in recent years, addressing the limitations of traditional therapy and treatment methods. Due to their improved drug solubility, stability, precise delivery, and ability to target specific sites, nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems have emerged as highly promising solutions. The successful interaction of nanoparticles with biological systems, on the other hand, is dependent on their intentional surface engineering. As a result, biomimetic nanoparticles have been developed as novel drug carriers. In-depth knowledge of various biomimetic nanoparticles, their applications, and the methods used for their formulation, with emphasis on the microfluidic production technique, is provided in this review. Microfluidics has emerged as one of the most promising approaches for precise control, high reproducibility, scalability, waste reduction, and faster production times in the preparation of biomimetic nanoparticles. Significant advancements in personalized medicine can be achieved by harnessing the benefits of biomimetic nanoparticles and leveraging microfluidic technology, offering enhanced functionality and biocompatibility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Technological Approaches for Targeted Drug Delivery Systems)
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