Special Issue "Advances in Ocular Pharmacology"

A special issue of Pharmaceuticals (ISSN 1424-8247). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Ioannis Tsinopoulos
Website
Guest Editor
2nd Department of Ophthalmology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: cataract; epigenetics; nanotechnology
Dr. Ioanna Mylona
Website
Guest Editor
2nd Department of Ophthalmology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: medical research; glaucoma; cataract; cornea
Dr. Lampros Lamprogiannis

Guest Editor
Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Fellow, King's College Hospital, Great Ormond Street Hospital
Interests: pediatric ophthalmology ; strabismus; nanotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ocular pharmacology is a field that has grown rapidly during the last few years, as we have witnessed several new and promising treatments becoming available for eye disorders that are not amenable to surgery, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), diabetic macular edema (DME), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and virus infections.

The eye is an organ protected from environmental stress and obnoxious substances by various barriers, a fact that necessitates innovation in the administration route of pharmaceutical substances. Recently several innovative technologies have been developed to directly reach the vitreous chamber or the retina. Those include intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and direct intravitreal implants, using biodegradable or non-biodegradable polymer technology.

This Special Issue will summarize the state-of-the-art, and the latest findings published in the ocular pharmacology field, as well as to provide directions for future research.

Prof. Ioannis Tsinopoulos
Dr. Ioanna Mylona
Dr. Lampros Lamprogiannis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceuticals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ocular pharmacology
  • pharmacodynamics
  • ophthalmology
  • drug delivery systems

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Ocular Co-Delivery of Timolol and Brimonidine from a Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogel for the Treatment of Glaucoma: In Vitro and Ex Vivo Evaluation
Pharmaceuticals 2020, 13(6), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph13060126 - 21 Jun 2020
Abstract
Effective pharmacotherapy during glaucoma treatment depends on interventions that reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) and retain the IOP lowering effect for sufficient time so as to reduce dosing frequency and enhance patient adherence. Combination anti-glaucoma therapy and dosage forms that increase precorneal residence time [...] Read more.
Effective pharmacotherapy during glaucoma treatment depends on interventions that reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) and retain the IOP lowering effect for sufficient time so as to reduce dosing frequency and enhance patient adherence. Combination anti-glaucoma therapy and dosage forms that increase precorneal residence time could therefore constitute a promising therapeutic intervention. The in-situ gel forming self-assembling peptide ac-(RADA)4-CONH2 was evaluated as carrier for the ocular co-delivery of timolol maleate (TM) and brimonidine tartrate (BR). The hydrogel’s microstructure and mechanical properties were assessed with atomic force microscopy and rheology, respectively. Drug diffusion from the hydrogel was evaluated in vitro in simulated tear fluid and ex vivo across porcine corneas and its effect on the treated corneas was assessed through physicochemical characterization and histological analysis. Results indicated that TM and BR co-delivery affected hydrogel’s microstructure resulting in shorter nanofibers and a less rigid hydrogel matrix. Rapid and complete release of both drugs was achieved within 8 h, while a 2.8-fold and 5.4-fold higher corneal permeability was achieved for TM and BR, respectively. No significant alterations were induced in the structural integrity of the corneas treated with the hydrogel formulation, suggesting that self-assembling peptide hydrogels might serve as promising systems for combination anti-glaucoma therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Ocular Pharmacology)
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Open AccessArticle
Oral l-Cysteine Supplementation Enhances the Long Term-Effect of Topical Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) in Reducing the Corneal Haze after Photorefractive Keratectomy in Myopic Patients
Pharmaceuticals 2020, 13(4), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph13040067 - 15 Apr 2020
Abstract
We aimed at evaluating the long-term effects of l-cysteine oral supplementation to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) eye-drops on corneal re-epithelization and transparency in myopic patients subjected to photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Forty patients subjected to bilateral PRK for myopia were enrolled and [...] Read more.
We aimed at evaluating the long-term effects of l-cysteine oral supplementation to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) eye-drops on corneal re-epithelization and transparency in myopic patients subjected to photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Forty patients subjected to bilateral PRK for myopia were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups receiving an additional therapy together with the standard postoperative treatment consisting in local tobramycin 0.3%, dexamethasone 0.1%, diclofenac 0.1%, and 0.2% hyaluronate. Group 1 included 20 patients (11 males and 9 females; 34.09 ± 8 years of age) receiving only bFGF eye-drops (10 μg/10 μL) four times a day for 7 days starting from the day of surgery; Group 2 included 20 patients (12 males and 8 females; 37.35 ± 11.5 years of age) who were postoperatively administered with topical basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; 10 μg/10 μL) four times a day for 7 days plus oral l-cysteine supplementation (500 mg/capsule) once a day for 15 days, starting 7 days before PRK. Patients were followed-up for 12 months. Clinical ophthalmologic parameters were recorded for all the 80 examined eyes. The corneal transparency was evaluated in vivo by slit lamp and confocal microscopy. The data showed that: (a) the corneal haze occurred in a smaller percentage of the patients who were postoperatively administered with topical bFGF plus oral l-cysteine supplementation (Group 2) compared to patients who received only bFGF (Group 1); (b) at 6 months of follow-up, the stromal mean image brightness of the patients belonging to Group 2 was significantly lower than that of the Group 1 (p < 0.03), and, interestingly, the difference was even more evident at 12 month from the treatment (p < 0.001). Moreover, the final mean of the spherical equivalent refraction was −0.06 ± 0.2 D in Group 1 and −0.08 ± 0.3 D in Group 2, whereas the final uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) was equal or superior to 20/25 in 100% of eyes in both Group 1 and 2. Post refractive patients can benefit from the administration of l-cysteine before the surgery and in association with bFGF in the early postoperative period, showing a faster corneal re-epithelization able to prevent corneal haze in the long-term recovery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Ocular Pharmacology)
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