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Special Issue "Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Rafat A. Siddiqui

Nutrition Science and Food Chemistry, Agricultural Research Station, College of Agriculture, Virginia State University
Website | E-Mail
Interests: lipids in health and disease; nutraceuticals for anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and anti-diabetic properties; nutrients for improving muscle growth; super foods
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Mohammed Moghadasian

The University of Manitoba and St. Boniface Hospital Research Centre, St. Boniface Hospital, Winnipeg, MB R2H 2A6 Canada
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: functional foods and nutraceuticals; metabolic disorders, diet, and drug Interactions; maternal and child nutrition; lipid nutrition and metabolism; nutrition through the life cycle

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The term “nutraceuticals” is derived from “nutrition” and “pharmaceuticals” and used for nutrition products that are also used as medicine. “Nutraceuticals” often contain modified/unmodified whole food, plant extracts alone or in combination, semi-purified and purified phytochemicals, or a combination of different phytochemicals. On the other hand, nutritional supplements are nutritional compounds that supplement one’s diet by increasing one’s total daily intake. Nutritional supplements also contain substances alone or in combination with vitamins and minerals, with or without other herbal products. The interest in nutraceuticals is growing, as these products are often used for preventing chronic diseases, delaying the ageing process, improving one’s bodily structure, and increasing life expectancy. These are often perceived as “safe” and less likely to have side effects. However, scientific research on nutraceuticals and nutrition supplements is frequently misinterpreted or overstretched for commercial interests because of high consumer demand. The purpose of this Special Issue on “Nutraceuticals, Nutrition Supplements, and Human Health” is to comprehensively review the data from basic and clinical research to discuss the benefits as well as potential adverse effects. We invite authors to submit original research and review articles that address the progress and our current understanding of nutraceuticals/supplements from in vitro and in vivo studies, as well as from clinical trials describing the benefits/adverse effects with underlying mechanisms. Topics are desired focusing on nutraceuticals/supplements analysis, intake, absorption and metabolism, cell signaling, gene expression, and variation in cellular effects due to gene polymorphisms. The overall goal of this Special Issue is to present readers with high-quality scientific evidence for the use of dietary supplements, nutraceuticals, and functional foods that can be properly used to improve health parameters in the various stages of one’s lifecycle.

Prof. Dr. Rafat A. Siddiqui
Prof. Dr. Mohammed Moghadasian
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Functional foods
  • Nutraceuticals
  • Dietary supplements
  • Chronic diseases
  • Health
  • Clinical trials
  • Animal studies

Published Papers (11 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Dietary and Supplement-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Pediatric Autism Spectrum Disorder
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1783; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081783
Received: 3 July 2019 / Revised: 23 July 2019 / Accepted: 26 July 2019 / Published: 1 August 2019
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Abstract
Previous literature has shown that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is steadily increasing in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, little data is currently available regarding its use, safety, and efficacy in children with ASD. Thus, the purpose of this study is to describe [...] Read more.
Previous literature has shown that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is steadily increasing in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, little data is currently available regarding its use, safety, and efficacy in children with ASD. Thus, the purpose of this study is to describe the use of supplement-based CAM therapies in children between the ages of 4 to 17 years with ASD. This population-based, cross-sectional study evaluated children with ASD regarding supplement use. A total of 210 participants were recruited from a variety of sources including educational and physical activity programs, and social media to complete a questionnaire. Primary caregivers provided information on current supplement based CAM use. Data evaluated the proportion of children that used supplement therapies, the types of supplements used, reasons for use, perceived safety, and demographic factors associated with use (e.g., income, parental education, severity of disorder). Seventy-five percent of children with ASD consumed supplements with multivitamins (77.8%), vitamin D (44.9%), omega 3 (42.5%), probiotics (36.5%), and magnesium (28.1%) as the most prevalent. Several supplements, such as adrenal cortex extract, where product safety has not yet been demonstrated, were also reported. A gluten free diet was the most common specialty diet followed amongst those with restrictions (14.8%). Health care professionals were the most frequent information source regarding supplements; however, 33% of parents reported not disclosing all their child’s supplements to their physician. In conclusion, the use of supplement therapies in children with ASD is endemic and highlights the need for further research concerning public health education surrounding safety and efficacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Use of an Extract of Annona muricata Linn to Prevent High-Fat Diet Induced Metabolic Disorders in C57BL/6 Mice
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1509; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071509
Received: 4 May 2019 / Revised: 6 June 2019 / Accepted: 30 June 2019 / Published: 2 July 2019
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Abstract
Annona muricata Linn, commonly known as graviola, is one of the most popular plants used in Brazil for weight loss. The aim of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic effects of three different doses (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, and 150 mg/kg) of [...] Read more.
Annona muricata Linn, commonly known as graviola, is one of the most popular plants used in Brazil for weight loss. The aim of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic effects of three different doses (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, and 150 mg/kg) of aqueous graviola leaf extract (AGE) supplemented by oral gavage, on obese C57BL/6 mice. Food intake, body weight, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), an insulin sensitivity test, quantification of adipose tissue cytokines, weight of fat pads, and serum biochemical and histological analyses of the liver, pancreas, and epididymal adipose tissue were measured. AGE had an anti-inflammatory effect by increasing IL-10 at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg. Regarding the cholesterol profile, there was a significant decrease in LDL-cholesterol levels in the AGE 150 group, and VLDL-cholesterol and triglycerides in the AGE 100 and 150 groups. There was an increase in HDL cholesterol in the AGE 150 group. The extract was able to reduce the adipocyte area of the epididymal adipose tissue in the AGE 100 and 150 groups. According to the histological analysis of the liver and pancreas, no significant difference was found among the groups. There were no significant effects of AGE on OGTT and serum fasting glucose concentration. However, the extract was effective in improving glucose tolerance in the AGE 150 group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Polyphenol-Enriched Plum Extract Enhances Myotubule Formation and Anabolism while Attenuating Colon Cancer-induced Cellular Damage in C2C12 Cells
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1077; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051077
Received: 5 April 2019 / Revised: 8 May 2019 / Accepted: 11 May 2019 / Published: 15 May 2019
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Abstract
Preventing muscle wasting in certain chronic diseases including cancer is an ongoing challenge. Studies have shown that polyphenols derived from fruits and vegetables shows promise in reducing muscle loss in cellular and animal models of muscle wasting. We hypothesized that polyphenols derived from [...] Read more.
Preventing muscle wasting in certain chronic diseases including cancer is an ongoing challenge. Studies have shown that polyphenols derived from fruits and vegetables shows promise in reducing muscle loss in cellular and animal models of muscle wasting. We hypothesized that polyphenols derived from plums (Prunus domestica) could have anabolic and anti-catabolic benefits on skeletal muscle. The effects of a polyphenol-enriched plum extract (PE60) were evaluated in vitro on C2C12 and Colon-26 cancer cells. Data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and we found that treatment of myocytes with plum extract increased the cell size by ~3-fold (p < 0.05) and stimulated myoblast differentiation by ~2-fold (p < 0.05). Plum extract induced total protein synthesis by ~50% (p < 0.05), reduced serum deprivation-induced total protein degradation by ~30% (p < 0.05), and increased expression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) by ~2-fold (p < 0.05). Plum extract also reduced tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activation by 80% (p < 0.05) in A549/NF-κB-luc cells. In addition, plum extract inhibited the growth of Colon-26 cancer cells, and attenuated cytotoxicity in C2C12 myoblasts induced by soluble factors released from Colon-26 cells. In conclusion, our data suggests that plum extract may have pluripotent health benefits on muscle, due to its demonstrated ability to promote myogenesis, stimulate muscle protein synthesis, and inhibit protein degradation. It also appears to protect muscle cell from tumor-induced cytotoxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Rectal and Vaginal Eradication of Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) in Pregnant Women by Using Lactobacillus salivarius CECT 9145, A Target-specific Probiotic Strain
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 810; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040810
Received: 13 March 2019 / Revised: 2 April 2019 / Accepted: 5 April 2019 / Published: 10 April 2019
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Abstract
Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococci, GBS) can cause severe neonatal sepsis. The recto-vaginal GBS screening of pregnant women and intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) to positive ones is one of the main preventive options. However, such a strategy has some limitations and there is [...] Read more.
Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococci, GBS) can cause severe neonatal sepsis. The recto-vaginal GBS screening of pregnant women and intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) to positive ones is one of the main preventive options. However, such a strategy has some limitations and there is a need for alternative approaches. Initially, the vaginal microbiota of 30 non-pregnant and 24 pregnant women, including the assessment of GBS colonization, was studied. Among the Lactobacillus isolates, 10 Lactobacillus salivarius strains were selected for further characterization. In vitro characterization revealed that L. salivarius CECT 9145 was the best candidate for GBS eradication. Its efficacy to eradicate GBS from the intestinal and vaginal tracts of pregnant women was evaluated in a pilot trial involving 57 healthy pregnant women. All the volunteers in the probiotic group (n = 25) were GBS-positive and consumed ~9 log10 cfu of L. salivarius CECT 9145 daily from week 26 to week 38. At the end of the trial (week 38), 72% and 68% of the women in this group were GBS-negative in the rectal and vaginal samples, respectively. L. salivarius CECT 9145 seems to be an efficient method to reduce the number of GBS-positive women during pregnancy, decreasing the number of women receiving IAP during delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Decaffeinated Green Tea Extract Does Not Elicit Hepatotoxic Effects and Modulates the Gut Microbiome in Lean B6C3F1 Mice
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 776; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040776
Received: 5 March 2019 / Revised: 25 March 2019 / Accepted: 29 March 2019 / Published: 3 April 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1318 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The main purpose of this study was to investigate the hepatotoxic potential and effects on the gut microbiome of decaffeinated green tea extract (dGTE) in lean B6C3F1 mice. Gavaging dGTE over a range of 1X–10X mouse equivalent doses (MED) for up to [...] Read more.
The main purpose of this study was to investigate the hepatotoxic potential and effects on the gut microbiome of decaffeinated green tea extract (dGTE) in lean B6C3F1 mice. Gavaging dGTE over a range of 1X–10X mouse equivalent doses (MED) for up to two weeks did not elicit significant histomorphological, physiological, biochemical or molecular alterations in mouse livers. At the same time, administration of dGTE at MED comparable to those consumed by humans resulted in significant modulation of gut microflora, with increases in Akkermansia sp. being most pronounced. Results of this study demonstrate that administration of relevant-to-human-consumption MED of dGTE to non-fasting mice does not lead to hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, dGTE administered to lean mice, caused changes in gut microflora comparable to those observed in obese mice. This study provides further insight into the previously reported weight management properties of dGTE; however, future studies are needed to fully evaluate and understand this effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Protein Hydrolysates from Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum) as Nutraceutical Molecules in Colon Cancer Treatment
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 724; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040724
Received: 8 March 2019 / Revised: 20 March 2019 / Accepted: 23 March 2019 / Published: 28 March 2019
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Abstract
The application of plant extracts for therapeutic purposes has been used in traditional medicine since the plants are a source of a great variety of chemical compounds that possess biological activity. Actually, the effect of these extracts on diseases such as cancer is [...] Read more.
The application of plant extracts for therapeutic purposes has been used in traditional medicine since the plants are a source of a great variety of chemical compounds that possess biological activity. Actually, the effect of these extracts on diseases such as cancer is being widely studied. Colorectal adenocarcinoma is one of the main causes of cancer related to death and the second most prevalent carcinoma in Western countries. The aim of this work is to study the possible effect of two fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum) protein hydrolysates on treatment and progression of colorectal cancer. Fenugreek proteins from seeds were hydrolysed by using two enzymes separately, which are named Purafect and Esperase, and were then tested on differentiated and undifferentiated human colonic adenocarcinoma Caco2/TC7 cells. Both hydrolysates did not affect the growth of differentiated cells, while they caused a decrease in undifferentiated cell proliferation by early apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in phase G1. This was triggered by a mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, cytochrome C release to cytoplasm, and caspase-3 activation. In addition, the hydrolysates of fenugreek proteins displayed antioxidant activity since they reduce the intracellular levels of ROS. These findings suggest that fenugreek protein hydrolysates could be used as nutraceutical molecules in colorectal cancer treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Bioavailability and Sustained Plasma Concentrations of CoQ10 in Healthy Volunteers by a Novel Oral Timed-Release Preparation
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 527; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030527
Received: 8 February 2019 / Revised: 23 February 2019 / Accepted: 25 February 2019 / Published: 28 February 2019
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Abstract
Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a natural compound with potent antioxidant properties. Its provision through diet does not always allow adequate levels in the human body, and supplementation is often necessary. This bioavailability study intended to explore the plasma concentration levels of a novel [...] Read more.
Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a natural compound with potent antioxidant properties. Its provision through diet does not always allow adequate levels in the human body, and supplementation is often necessary. This bioavailability study intended to explore the plasma concentration levels of a novel CoQ10 oral preparation (COQUN®, Coenzyme Q10 Miniactives Retard 100 mg capsules) mimicking assumption on a regular basis. Twenty-four healthy adults tested a single dose of CoQ10 100 mg in one day to assess bioavailability. After a one week wash-out period, they were randomly assigned (1:1) to continuous administration for four weeks: Group A (n = 12) 100 mg once a day (OD); and Group B (n = 12) 100 mg twice a day (BID). During the single dose phase, Cmax was observed at 4 h, and the mean values of AUCt and Tmax were 8754 μg/mL·h and 4.29 h, respectively. The multiple dose phase showed increasing plasma levels up to 7 days after the start of administration, and sustained high concentrations during the all administration period. No relevant adverse events were reported. These results show that Miniactives® technology can release CoQ10 to allow high constant blood concentrations without a sharp decrease. This may be the first step of evidence for a potential new antioxidative treatment in human chronic diseases deserving high CoQ10 levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Prevention of Recurrent Acute Otitis Media in Children Through the Use of Lactobacillus salivarius PS7, a Target-Specific Probiotic Strain
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 376; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020376
Received: 8 January 2019 / Revised: 2 February 2019 / Accepted: 4 February 2019 / Published: 12 February 2019
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Abstract
Acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the most common bacterial infections in children. Empiric antibiotherapy leads to increasing antimicrobial resistance rates among otopathogens and may impair the correct development of the microbiota in early life. In this context, probiotics seem to be [...] Read more.
Acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the most common bacterial infections in children. Empiric antibiotherapy leads to increasing antimicrobial resistance rates among otopathogens and may impair the correct development of the microbiota in early life. In this context, probiotics seem to be an attractive approach for preventing recurrent AOM (rAOM) through the restoration of the middle ear and nasopharyngeal microbiota. The aim of this study was the selection of a probiotic strain (Lactobacillus salivarius PS7), specifically tailored for its antagonism against otopathogens. Since L. salivarius PS7 was safe and displayed a strong antimicrobial activity against otopathogens, its efficacy in preventing rAOM was assessed in a trial involving 61 children suffering from rAOM. Children consumed daily ~1 × 109 CFU of L. salivarius PS7, and the number of AOM episodes were registered and compared with that observed in the previous 6 and 12 months. The microbiota of samples collected from the external auditory canal samples was quantitatively and qualitatively assessed. The number of AOM episodes during the intervention period decreased significantly (84%) when compared to that reported during the 6 months period before the probiotic intervention. In conclusion, L. salivarius PS7 is a promising strain for the prevention of rAOM in infants and children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Exploring the Science behind Bifidobacterium breve M-16V in Infant Health
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1724; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081724
Received: 9 July 2019 / Revised: 22 July 2019 / Accepted: 24 July 2019 / Published: 25 July 2019
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Abstract
Probiotics intervention has been proposed as a feasible preventative approach against adverse health-related complications in infants. Nevertheless, the umbrella concept of probiotics has led to a massive application of probiotics in a range of products for promoting infant health, for which the strain-specificity, [...] Read more.
Probiotics intervention has been proposed as a feasible preventative approach against adverse health-related complications in infants. Nevertheless, the umbrella concept of probiotics has led to a massive application of probiotics in a range of products for promoting infant health, for which the strain-specificity, safety and efficacy findings associated with a specific probiotics strain are not clearly defined. Bifidobacterium breve M-16V is a commonly used probiotic strain in infants. M-16V has been demonstrated to offer potential in protecting infants from developing the devastating necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) and allergic diseases. This review comprehends the potential beneficial effects of M-16V on infant health particularly in the prevention and treatment of premature birth complications and immune-mediated disorders in infants. Mechanistic studies supporting the use of M-16V implicated that M-16V is capable of promoting early gut microbial colonisation and may be involved in the regulation of immune balance and inflammatory response to protect high-risk infants from NEC and allergies. Summarised information on M-16V has provided conceptual proof of the use of M-16V as a potential probiotics candidate aimed at promoting infant health, particularly in the vulnerable preterm population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health)
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Open AccessReview
Nutraceutical Potential of Carica papaya in Metabolic Syndrome
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1608; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071608
Received: 21 June 2019 / Revised: 8 July 2019 / Accepted: 10 July 2019 / Published: 16 July 2019
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Abstract
Carica papaya L. is a well-known fruit worldwide, and its highest production occurs in tropical and subtropical regions. The pulp contains vitamins A, C, and E, B complex vitamins, such as pantothenic acid and folate, and minerals, such as magnesium and potassium, as [...] Read more.
Carica papaya L. is a well-known fruit worldwide, and its highest production occurs in tropical and subtropical regions. The pulp contains vitamins A, C, and E, B complex vitamins, such as pantothenic acid and folate, and minerals, such as magnesium and potassium, as well as food fibers. Phenolic compounds, such as benzyl isothiocyanate, glucosinolates, tocopherols (α and δ), β-cryptoxanthin, β-carotene and carotenoids, are found in the seeds. The oil extracted from the seed principally presents oleic fatty acid followed by palmitic, linoleic and stearic acids, whereas the leaves have high contents of food fibers and polyphenolic compounds, flavonoids, saponins, pro-anthocyanins, tocopherol, and benzyl isothiocyanate. Studies demonstrated that the nutrients present in its composition have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system, protecting it against cardiovascular illnesses and preventing harm caused by free radicals. It has also been reported that it aids in the treatment of diabetes mellitus and in the reduction of cholesterol levels. Thus, both the pulp and the other parts of the plant (leaves and seeds) present antioxidant, anti-hypertensive, hypoglycemic, and hypolipidemic actions, which, in turn, can contribute to the prevention and treatment of obesity and associated metabolic disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health)
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Open AccessReview
Pharmacological Properties of Morus nigra L. (Black Mulberry) as A Promising Nutraceutical Resource
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 437; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020437
Received: 30 January 2019 / Revised: 13 February 2019 / Accepted: 18 February 2019 / Published: 20 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (296 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Mulberry plants belonging to the Moraceae family have been grown for the purpose of being the nutrient source for silk worm and raw materials for the preparation of jams, marmalades, vinegars, juices, wines, and cosmetics. Morus nigra L. (black mulberry) is native to [...] Read more.
Mulberry plants belonging to the Moraceae family have been grown for the purpose of being the nutrient source for silk worm and raw materials for the preparation of jams, marmalades, vinegars, juices, wines, and cosmetics. Morus nigra L. (black mulberry) is native to Southwestern Asia, and it has been used as a traditional herbal medicine for animals and humans. In this article, recent research progress on various biological and pharmacological properties of extracts, fractions, and isolated active constituents from different parts of M. nigra are reviewed. M. nigra exhibited a wide-spectrum of biological and pharmacological therapeutic effects including antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti-melanogenic, antidiabetic, anti-obesity, anti-hyperlipidemic, and anticancer activities. M. nigra also showed protective effects against various human organs and systems, mainly based on its antioxidant capacity. These findings strongly suggest that M. nigra can be used as a promising nutraceutical resource to control and prevent various chronic diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Leader author: Dr. Rafat Siddiqui
Titles: Polyphenol-Enriched Plum Extract Enhances Myotubule Formation and Anabolism while Attenuating Colon Cancer-induced Cellular Damage in C2C12 Cells

Leader author: Dr. Igor Koturbash
Title: Decaffeinated Green Tea Extract Does Not Elicit Hepatotoxic Effects and Modulates the Gut Microbiome in Lean B6C3F1 Mice

Leader author: Dr. Juan M. Rodríguez
Title: Prevention of Recurrent Acute Otitis Media in Children Through the Use of Lactobacillus salivarius PS7, a Target-Specific Probiotic Strain 

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