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Open AccessArticle

Protein Hydrolysates from Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum) as Nutraceutical Molecules in Colon Cancer Treatment

1
Laboratoire de Nutrition Clinique et Métabolique, Faculté des Sciences de la Nature et de la Vie, Université Oran1, 31000 Oran, Algeria
2
Departamento de Farmacología y Fisiología, Unidad de Fisiología, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Zaragoza, CIBERobn (ISCIII), IIS Aragón, IA2, 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
3
Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular y Celular, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Zaragoza, CIBERobn (ISCIII), IIS Aragón, IA2, 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
4
Laboratoire de Génie Enzymatique et de Microbiologie—Ecole Nationale d’Ingénieurs de Sfax, 3038 Sfax, Tunisia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 724; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040724
Received: 8 March 2019 / Revised: 20 March 2019 / Accepted: 23 March 2019 / Published: 28 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical, Nutrition Supplements and Human Health)
The application of plant extracts for therapeutic purposes has been used in traditional medicine since the plants are a source of a great variety of chemical compounds that possess biological activity. Actually, the effect of these extracts on diseases such as cancer is being widely studied. Colorectal adenocarcinoma is one of the main causes of cancer related to death and the second most prevalent carcinoma in Western countries. The aim of this work is to study the possible effect of two fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum) protein hydrolysates on treatment and progression of colorectal cancer. Fenugreek proteins from seeds were hydrolysed by using two enzymes separately, which are named Purafect and Esperase, and were then tested on differentiated and undifferentiated human colonic adenocarcinoma Caco2/TC7 cells. Both hydrolysates did not affect the growth of differentiated cells, while they caused a decrease in undifferentiated cell proliferation by early apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in phase G1. This was triggered by a mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, cytochrome C release to cytoplasm, and caspase-3 activation. In addition, the hydrolysates of fenugreek proteins displayed antioxidant activity since they reduce the intracellular levels of ROS. These findings suggest that fenugreek protein hydrolysates could be used as nutraceutical molecules in colorectal cancer treatment. View Full-Text
Keywords: fenugreek; protein hydrolysate; antiproliferative; apoptosis; antioxidant; Caco2 cells fenugreek; protein hydrolysate; antiproliferative; apoptosis; antioxidant; Caco2 cells
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Allaoui, A.; Gascón, S.; Benomar, S.; Quero, J.; Osada, J.; Nasri, M.; Rodríguez-Yoldi, M.J.; Boualga, A. Protein Hydrolysates from Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum) as Nutraceutical Molecules in Colon Cancer Treatment. Nutrients 2019, 11, 724.

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